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can you use the oxygen from electrolysis as your only oxygen for a hydrogen motor or does it not produce enough oxygen? Answered

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Jack A Lopez
Jack A Lopez

5 years ago

The mole ratio of hydrogen to oxygen, produced by an electrolytic cell designed to produce both, this ratio should be close to stoichiometric; i.e. 2:1, i.e. the same ratio as found in the balanced equation,

2 H2 +1 O2 = 2 H2O

For burning fuel and oxidizer, in an internal combustion engine (ICE) the ratio of moles of fuel to moles of oxidizer can be exactly stoichiometric, or somewhat less than that ratio(called lean), or somewhat more (called rich).

Usually there is a pretty wide range. The mixture does not have to be perfectly stoichiometric for the engine to keep firing. However, for a non-stoichiometric mixture, there is necessarily going to be some lost efficiency, due to unreacted fuel (for lean mixture) or unreacted oxidizer (for rich mixture) in the exhaust.

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iceng
iceng

Answer 5 years ago

I remember very little of stoichiometric theory but what stuck in my mind was never to lean my engine beyond stoichiometric as that would burn the valves of my reciprocating motor just FYI :-)

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Kiteman
Kiteman

5 years ago

As long as you have no leaks, electrolysing water produces exactly the right amount of oxygen to burn your hydrogen.

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rickharris
rickharris

5 years ago

In principle - You can gather twice as much O2 as H.

So if you burn the resulting gasses you will produce water H2O with 100% efficiency. Of course nothing, especially engines will be 100% efficient so although your will get ignition you will get some residual gas - Hydrogen usually.

in most Hydrogen engines it is reacted with sir so it has an over abundance of oxygen to react with.

If your using a fuel cell I think the efficiency may be higher.