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cheapest way to convert dc to ac? Answered

what is the cheapest way to convert dc to ac.i need a cheap an simple solution.i don't need a circuit that convert 12VDC to 220VAC
i need a 12VDC to AC circuit

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chrlruiz73
chrlruiz73

8 months ago

How can I change my AC DC speed controller to be AC AC do I can use a bridge rectifier to power a treadmill motor

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Hisanonym
Hisanonym

10 months ago

How do I use a 3, 6, or 9 volt battery to power a 6-8 foot (2-3 meter)string of standard 110v AC outdoor LED Christmas lights? A simple circuit or other solution would be helpful. Thanks. Actually, I don’t know if the lights require AC or if that is just how they are packaged.

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vina1991
vina1991

4 years ago

Finally I found a simple dc to ac converter/inverter

POWER-INVERTER.png
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johnyradio
johnyradio

Reply 2 years ago

don't you need a clock?

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-max-
-max-

4 years ago

Probably the easiest way to produce a 12V AC would be to use a full H bridge converter. They are generally used for reversing polarity to things like motors, but if driven with something like a 555, they can easily produce an AC signal. Using a arduino to drive the H bridge can allow for sophisticated control, like using a remote or sensor input. Using an arduino might even allow you to drive the H bridge using PWM so that you get a more "sinusoidal" signal (after some LC filtering.)

A motor shield might actually be perfect for your application.

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

Answer 4 years ago

See also OP comment "cheapest way"......

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-max-
-max-

Answer 4 years ago

I can't imagine 4 transistors or MOSFETs being that expensive, and 555 timers cost pennies, but like I said, an arduino could be used for additional functionality, like proper "modified sine wave" behavior rather than an AC square wave, and inputs for controlling the output could be implemented easily.

Thought thinking about it, if he was really pinching pennies, and did not mind a few additional disadvantages, a half-bridge setup could be used, replacing half the transistors with capacitors instead to create a "floating" ground point.

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Downunder35m
Downunder35m

4 years ago

Just to make an end here:
Use this and replace the output transformer with a 1:1 model.
Could work without the transformer as well but the transformer helps to protect your electronics and limits current inrush when connecting something to it.

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-max-
-max-

4 years ago

Do you just want some high voltage? There are lots of simple and easy oscillator circuits that use transformers. My favorite oscillator for high power stuff so far is the ZVS driver. It is generally used to drive flybacks but will do a good job with standard 60Hz transformers as well. The frequency will not be too stable, but it can deliver 100's of watts, and the transistors do not even need heatsinking! The one I built a while ago was capable of powering a 60W lamp near full brightness, and burned out a smaller lamp.

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

Answer 4 years ago

OP specifically says NO, he just wants 12V AC

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-max-
-max-

Answer 4 years ago

Ahh, might help to read the question a bit more carefully lol!

Anyway that would even easier, only needing the full H bridge! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H_bridge

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-max-
-max-

Answer 4 years ago

If you want a both high power, and a stable 60Hz frequency, and don't care about using a modified square wave, you could use the ZVS circuit with a smaller, higher power transformer like those used in switch mode power supplies to generate a high voltage 220V AC at several KHz, and then use a rectifier to convert that to DC, and a H bridge to convert that into a 60hz AC.

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Josehf Murchison
Josehf Murchison

4 years ago

12 Volt Oscillator Circuit.

Same as the one that steps up 12 volts DC to 220 volts AC only no step up transformer so it is 12 volts DC to 12 volts AC.

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vina1991
vina1991

Answer 4 years ago

Hallo sir

can you give a circuit diagram?

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

4 years ago

You don't say what current you need, or the frequency.

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Konstantin Dimitrov
Konstantin Dimitrov

4 years ago

It will be much faster and easier to buy inverter from the local store. If you want you can make one - https://www.instructables.com/id/12vDC-to-220vAC-100watts-inverter/

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vina1991
vina1991

Answer 4 years ago

Hallo

its not simple.very complecated

F4VTNE4FU6LZOQE.png
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Downunder35m
Downunder35m

4 years ago

Are you sure a circuit would be right for you?
Just wondering as you say you don't need 12V DC to 220V AC, but you do need 12V DC to AC.
Well, AC is AC and unless you specify a different voltage noone here has a clue what you really want.

And if you want to convert 12V DC to 12V AC it would still make sense to know why as usually there are better options available.

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vina1991
vina1991

Answer 4 years ago

Hallo

OK,can you give a simple 12VDC to 220VAC circuit?