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copyright laws and answer books? Answered

I want to write answer manuals for textbooks that don't provide the answers in the back in my fields of physical science and math. I want to make my own answers, proof check with others, and probably e-publish it.

My question is on the legality of doing this. The copyright aspect pertains to the questions themselves. The answers are all original on my part. Now I suppose it is harder for copyrighted, recently published books but do you think the authors of free albeit copyrighted texts (textbookrevolution.com) are more willing to allow me to do this?

How does cramster get away with this?

Discussions

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Kiteman

7 years ago

If you're not actually copying anything from the texts, then copyright law does not apply.

However, I would question the educational morality of such books - the point of the questions in text books is to embed learning by applying what has already been learned.

If the questions are set as part of a course, but a student merely hands in a copy of the answer you already gave, then they are [a] cheating and [b] breaking copyright law themselves (unless you specifically state in the book that they have permission to copy the answers and hand them in, which brings us smack into point [a] again).

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thegeeke

7 years ago

As rickharris said: I don't think it's a problem as long as you don't copy the questions. I would be careful about using the title of the books.

I'm not a lawyer.

Here's the best way to make sure that you're legal: contact the authors and ask them their permission, and what you are allowed to copy. Probably they would be fine with you doing that, and you wouldn't have any question about whether or not it's legal.

Good luck, hope everything works out for you! :)

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rickharris

7 years ago

My none lawyer view: If you don't repeat the question as originally printed your not breaking the copyright.

If you print the questions then you should get permission.

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Re-design

7 years ago

My work uses the copyright law frequently and I'm not aware of any provision of the law that would prevent you from writing an answer manual to any book.

Is there a portion of the law that you see that prevents that?

I could be entirely wrong since my work is of a very different nature though.