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for a coil gun is it better to have high current or high voltage? Answered

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Plasmana
Plasmana

Best Answer 11 years ago

It depends on the build of the coil. If the coil has a very few turns of thick wire, then low voltage and high current is suitable. If the coil has many turns of thin wire, then high voltage and low current is suitable.

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500waffles_
500waffles_

Answer 4 years ago

if ur still on instructables I have a design question for you plasmana

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thermoelectric
thermoelectric

Answer 11 years ago

Since your talking bout coilguns, Is a coil with many turns of thin wire suitable for a second stage (after an injector) or a coil with very few turns of thick wire, Which is more suitable?

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Plasmana
Plasmana

Answer 11 years ago

Hmm, that is a good question, I never built a coilgun with two or more stages, so I don't know which wire would be suitable...

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afehr
afehr

8 years ago

I have a question? I thought about taking the capacitors and 40000uf 200v.
And as a circuit using a flash, it can go?
(sorry if you do not understand what I wrote, because I used google translator because I speak Italian)
Thanks in advance: D

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nidobrito
nidobrito

11 years ago

Depends...but in generals high voltage....because if have a high voltage have a big current.....[ ohm law XD

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thermoelectric
thermoelectric

Answer 11 years ago

High voltage isn't necessarily high current, For example a NST puts out about 15000 volts and 0.02 of an amp...

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nidobrito
nidobrito

Answer 11 years ago

but in this case is because we have a capacitor....

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thermoelectric
thermoelectric

Answer 11 years ago

Yeah, Which can be either low voltage and high current or mildly high voltage with high current

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nidobrito
nidobrito

Answer 11 years ago

Yo! but in high current (in case of capacitor discharge) the current is much more than a low voltage....XD \o/

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chriskarr
chriskarr

Answer 11 years ago

Current IS amperage. Voltage has nothing to do with current, except that, when multiplied by voltage, you have the VA (apparent power) of the system. The reason it is apparent power and not real power is that it doesn't factor in phase angle.

When you discharge a high-voltage capacitor that is the same physical size as a low-voltage capacitor, chances are you'll get less energy out. The reason for this is that the capacitor will take more insulation (dielectric thickness) to make it so that the capacitor doesn't burn a hole in itself.

When you have a 10KV capacitor rated at 1µF, it has the same power as a 50V 40,000µF, just at a higher voltage. Guess which capacitor would cost more. I'll give you a hint; higher-voltage capacitors tend to cost more than polarized electrolytics.

Just some food for thought. Perhaps you should look up the formulas before assuming that your own perception is correct. That has made me have many experimental failures in the past.

If you'd like to verify my math, you can use the formula Joules=(C*V2)/2
Where
Joules = energy stored.
C = capacitance
V = voltage the capacitor is charged to

Have fun! =)

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thermoelectric
thermoelectric

Answer 11 years ago

Wow, You're pretty good, Since you know a bit about coil guns, Is it better to have the first stage having thicker magnet wire and less turns or a coil with thinner magnet wire and more turns? I have a coil with thin wire and about 12 layers whereas the bigger coil I have has about 16-18guage, thicker wire with about 3 layers. What coil should I have as the first stage and which for the second stage? I also have an injector coil...

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chriskarr
chriskarr

Answer 11 years ago

What you really need depends upon the capacitor type you are using. A higher voltage rated capacitor will discharge more quickly and, for that reason, is better for the second, third, fourth etc. stages, whereas, for the first stage, it's better to have fewer turns and a higher capacitance, lower voltage capacitor. You want to get it moving with the first stage, and a high capacitance will make it move because of the similar magnetic field density over a longer time. You'll want to make sure that your wire can stand up to the discharge of the capacitor..... If it can't then you'll end up not looking so great, anymore. You may even end up in a morgue. Be careful.

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thermoelectric
thermoelectric

Answer 11 years ago

Well I have a cap bank, about 300v at 1000uf, I also have about 10 photo flash caps, So I will make a smaller bank with them... The coils can both stand 300v at 1000uf, So I think they will survive...

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nidobrito
nidobrito

Answer 11 years ago

lol it's relative.....but for a injector coil use a coil with a thin mag wire to make a little but strong coil and discharge only a little cap(a flash cap will be OK) to change the inertia state of the bullet...the next stage use a thicker wire to make a coil for big currents an with low resistance....

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nidobrito
nidobrito

Answer 11 years ago

and i know the formula of energy stored in the cap....

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nidobrito
nidobrito

Answer 11 years ago

lol I know this man..I'm working in my coilgun since begin last year...i suggest use a high voltage cap because they apparent power is higher an the losses of energy will be low if compare with the low voltage.........but have the disadvantage of the insulation(need be more strong)..... and a higher voltage will affect the suck back effect and increase the efficiency of the coilgun.... if the apparent power is > than the real power of capacitors they will discharge more fast on the coil generating a more strong magnetic field