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how can i tune a received ightwave like a guitar's strings and what is the energy required per kHz? Answered


                                                                     Is a light wave like a guitar string?
Can i take a received electro magnetic wave and tune it? For instance, can I take white light into a device and change the waves properties so that it comes out as red light, or microwave radiation? The applications could be staggerring. If, for instance, I could take incoming sunlight and tune the wave so that the output was alternating current electricity. This would seem to me to be a far better way to harness the enormous energy contained in a lightwave.

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iceng
iceng

Answer 9 years ago

It devastates me to learn the military has lapsed and solar power generation
is now the domain of the populace at large :-)

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orksecurity
orksecurity

9 years ago

Lots of fallacies in that guess, I'm afraid.

No, a light wave is not like a guitar string. A closer analogy would be to the sound _after_ it leaves the guitar string. If you move relative to the wave the Doppler effect will cause a change in the perceived frequency (as you are overtaken by more or fewer peaks per second), but to get much shift out of that you have to be moving at a significant percentage of the speed at which the wave is travelling.

Second, shifting the frequency of an electromagnetic wave will not make it "alternating current electricity". It remains an eletromagnetic _field_. To make electricity out of it, you have apply it to a conductor (an antenna coil, presumably). To get any significant amount of electricity out if it, it has to be a fairly strong field..

The best ways we have to harness sunlight remain converting it into heat (solar ovens, for example), photocells which use the energy directly to produce an electric charge by exciting electrons across a potential barrier, and photosynthesis. There *may* be some new technologies in the pipeline; MIT recently announced some work on what amounts to synthetic photosynthesis.

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rickharris
rickharris

9 years ago

Although what you suggest is done in many way - as for the application you seem to have in mind I think the answer is no.

There are many issues involved.

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iceng
iceng

9 years ago

Plasma, lasers, LEDs and Phosphors take one light frequency to excite an
atom's electrons to a higher energy level, Then these excited electrons drop,
return (jump) to their original lowly state by one or more steps down.
In one of those steps the electron fluctuates a photon of the light we see.

I bet the military is doing Sunlight to DC energy.
I think they call the research, Solarium Siliconium. I heard they are doing a version that is referred as Solarium Siliconium Germanium. This device doubles the Sun conversion by converting both the visible light and the IR light
to DC energy.
In fact they rotate these devices a secret way and they do get AC. You should
look to be approached by some men-in-black. They came by here but were
not so nice and I am a bit too old.

Good luck,

A