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how long of pvc can hold up to 300psi? Answered

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Wired_Mist

4 years ago

Length doesn't matter, Only the maximum rating of the PVC Pipe. Also you need to consider the strength of the joints. between the pipes

As you add more length you will increase the capacity, rather then the maximum PSI.

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steveastrouk

4 years ago

How long is a piece of string ?

What diameter ? What material specification, what wall thickness ? What temperature ? What volume - because a volume of gas under pressure stores one hell of a lot of energy, and if it lets go, you could have at a hand grenade's energy to contend with.

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iceng

4 years ago

As a diver who used to carry 2500psi large Al containers on his back.

Those air tanks are certified every few years by being submerged in a heavy steel enclosure with a tiny hole on top feeding a transparent graduated tube that measures the expansion of the tank under 2500 + psi air pressure by the water rise. A certain amount of expansion is expected and the tanks that pass are metal stamped on top super thick air inlet and regulator threaded top metal.

I can tell you PVC pipe stipulates the pressure it will withstand in it, if you just read the print on it.

Pity jduffy54 never static pressure tested his rechargeable PVC flash light..

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icengiceng

Answer 4 years ago

Yes, ....... well once heat treated that tank is splits-ville at 30% pressure it becomes a grenade.......................

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jduffy54

4 years ago

Not sure exactly what you mean by this. Do you mean what length, or diameter can hold 300 PSI? What length of time can it hold?

In either case, it is completely dependent on

A) what is at 300PSI (though I assume air)?

B) what do you plan to do with this 300PSI of something?

C) How much do you need to hold?

D) What container are you using? A foam-core PVC pipe can barely hold anything, a solid block of PVC with a tiny hole at the center can probably hold thousands of PSI. Most hardware store/plumbing pipes are only rated to about 150, anything above that is EXTREMELY dangerous.

Whatever it is, anything above about 25 PSI can be very dangerous if abused. If you don't know the capacity of the container you're using, there is no way you should be using this kind of pressure.

Check with the manufacturer before testing anything, if done carefully and correctly, high pressures aren't necessarily unsafe, but this much could be deadly if something goes wrong.