76Views10Replies

Author Options:

looking for anyone who knows how to repair ringer boxes and can tell me what parts I am missing Answered

I picked this old ringer box up because I wanted an old telephone system and have the phone and ringer box some how fixed up to the newer phone lines, but found no one who can tell me if the ringer box is broken or missing pars or just needs to be hooked up to an old telephone. anyone out there be able to help? oh and "be nice"? hey be as rude as you like make it like ya... well another q and a sight.

Discussions

0
None
Downunder35m

Best Answer 3 years ago

Ok, trying to be nice:
Where are the details?
As I have no clue without them I say the box is empty and won't work ;)

0
None
Josehf Murchison

3 years ago

Without a PIC I cant tell you what is missing, but I can tell you with all the parts and working they won't work on the newer lines because newer lines dial with tones and the old lines dial with clicks. You need a converter circuit that converts clicks to tones and a power supply to power the phone. God forbid if you are fiber optic.

0
None
Jack A LopezJosehf Murchison

Answer 3 years ago

There is a method of signaling that predates both tones and clicks, and that's the kind where turning a crank generates a ring signal, for to alert a human "operator" at a "central switching office". Then this operator person connects the call manually via something called a "switchboard".

That is to say the operator person does this after a brief conversation with the person who turned the crank on the remote telephone, for to ask the crank-turner to whose phone, or what line, the call should be placed.

I know. It seems like a ridiculous way to connect a phone call. But I think that is the way it was done prior to the invention of rotary-dialed telephones, and later, DTMF tones and computers and stuff.

0
None
Josehf MurchisonJack A Lopez

Answer 3 years ago

That is the way it was done at first in fact 25 years ago when I moved to the aria where I live now they were still in service.

0
None
petercd

3 years ago

You cant hook up a "ringer" to a modern network because they're different technologies.

The ringer was to generate a voltage usually 18V ac to ring a bell in the exchange where the operator sat.

When the operator plugged up the connection on their board it hooked up the two parties with a dc voltage that enabled them to talk. The op asks the caller who do you want to speak to and where are they, ie number please.

So basically the "ringer" you have is an ac magneto affair that rang one of those old solenoid coil bells.

How on earth do you imagine that you'll interface this to a modern digital tone dialing system( DTMF)?

Id be flabergasted if you even got it to work with an ancient pulse dialing electromechanical exchange.

Long story short...it wont happen.

Grab hold of the 2 wires coming out of the box that you're expecting to hook up and give the handle on the side a good spin, If you can feel something its working.

0
None
Jack A Lopez

3 years ago

I don't know if you've tried this yet, but an image search, like, using the words, "old telephone ringer box",

https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&site=imghp&tbm...

will return a whole bunch of pictures people have uploaded, related to "old telephone ringer box".

Then you can look through this stream of of pictures for to find things similar to the thing you've got.

Sometimes, including additional search words, like, "parts", "repair", "wiring diagram", can help pick out the pages authored by people who understand, know how to fix, the artifacts they're taking pictures of.

0
None
rickharris

3 years ago

Most telephone systems operate on 50 volts DC. Details and pictures required.

A little googling will help you a lot.

0
None
Jack A Lopez

3 years ago

I am guessing this thing you call a "ringer box" is a box for to make, generate, a ring signal. Does it have a crank on the side?

Or is the "ringer box" a box that rings, i.e. it makes ringing noise, or flashing lights, or something, when it detects, receives, a ring signal? I mean usually that functionality is part of a typical telephone, but they did make boxes that were just ringer, no phone.

I am not sure which one you're asking about, or if you're asking about something completely different.