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need to confirm the voltage is 220v how we found either AC or DC? with out voltmeter? Answered

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

5 years ago

If you hold onto the wire, if you can't let go, its DC....

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rickharris
rickharris

Answer 5 years ago

Cynic!

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iceng
iceng

Answer 5 years ago

Iv twice survived 220 VAC across my chest reaching into a metal cabinet through an access pannel.

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verence
verence

Answer 5 years ago

Not 100% reliable. Even AC can make you cramp shut.

So it's more like: If you can let go, it was AC. If you can't, it can have been AC or DC ... but who cares? At least not you (anymore)!

And yes, that was cynic. :-)

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iceng
iceng

5 years ago

If you have a car in garage you have a table lamp.

Plug the lamp into your outlet and see if it the light turns ON ?

If it does not light then you you have no power = 0v ... No 220v

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iceng
iceng

Answer 5 years ago

You are using a lamp as a voltmeter :)

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mpilchfamily
mpilchfamily

5 years ago

What it is your trying to measure? More info would help and pictures if you got them.

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Wired_Mist
Wired_Mist

Answer 5 years ago

+1 to more Info !

If it's main's voltage (directly from the wall) they will mostlikely be AC. You need a few components to convert to DC, like a Diode Bridge Rectifier. These components will be in a enclosure that should be easy to Identify.

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rickharris
rickharris

Answer 5 years ago

+1 you should be able to "know" what your local voltage is give or take a few volts. wall current is AC throughout the world.

A generator will give AC if not a permanent magnet generator with brushes. on a commutator (a slotted copper ring that the brushes run on)

If the brushes run on a solid set of 2 or 3 rings (slip rings) then it is producing AC.

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Jack A Lopez
Jack A Lopez

5 years ago

I think the usual tool is a multimeter,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multimeter

But you said, "with out volmeter", that is without a multimeter?

A neon lamp style voltage tester can tell AC from DC. This page,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Neonlamp3.JPG

from the article titled "Neon Lamp" shows how AC and different polarity DC look applied to a neon lamp.

Measuring voltage magnitude, e.g. telling the difference between 110 VAC and 220 VAC will be more difficult using a neon lamp style voltage tester, unless it is specifically the kind of neon lamp style voltage tester made to do that.