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possibility of Wave Change? Answered

This theory states (my own be exact) that a certain wavelength can become an amorphous solid using a certain gas, a friend of mine agreed with me. What is your opinion on this matter?

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Kiteman
Kiteman

11 years ago

I'm guessing you mean sound wave?

Whilst it is true that sound-waves compress gases (that's what a sound-wave is, a travelling region of compression), they do not compress the gas enough to even liquefy it, never mind solidify it - the pressures required simply cannot be achieved with sound at all,

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kelseymh
kelseymh

Reply 11 years ago

See my reply to this person's clarification.  It's actually not an unreasonable physics problem, but there's a lot of detailed interaction parameters necessary to figure out how to implement it. It's not a likely project for junior-high level science.

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crc09
crc09

11 years ago

I should state:
1) I'm junior in HIGH SCHOOL
2) This is still just a very rough idea

explanation:
you know how Mercury gas turns to plasma when you apply electricity? If a wavelength ( sound or microwave ) MIGHT trigger a reaction and turn into glass ( or wax or plastic ) then way could be devised to turn it back to a gas.

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kelseymh
kelseymh

Reply 11 years ago

Okay, thank you for the additional information!  Here's the language to describe what you mean:  You want to use some specific wavelength (frequency) of either sound or EM to trigger a phase change in some other material.  That is not an unreasonable idea.

For your example, "mercury gas turns to plasma when you apply electricity," that's true of essentially any gas.  Look up "ionization potential" in Wikipedia.  If you apply high voltage to any gas, it will become a plasma.  It doesn't depend on frequency.

Your idea of a reversible phase change -- take a gas or plasma, apply a resonant frequency pulse to "freeze" it, and a different pulse to "thaw" it, is certainly possible in principle.  However, you will probably need a more detailed understanding of material properties and interactions in order to work out the details necessary to implement it in practice.

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kelseymh
kelseymh

11 years ago

You're using words which have no meaning when strung together the way you have them.  Until and unless you can provide meaning, my description of this statement is "nonsense."

"This theory" -- what theory?  Can you give a publication reference?

"Certain wavelength" -- wavelength of what?  Light?  Sound?  Water?  Rock?

"Amorphous solid" -- why not just say glass, since that what those words mean?

"wavelength can become a glass" -- This is simple nonsense.  A wave is a particular kind of (oscillatory) motion in a medium.  Wavelength is a measurement of the separation between successive oscillation, and has units of legnth.  A measured number doesn't "become" a material.

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CameronSS
CameronSS

Reply 11 years ago

Such a useful word. Good thing we have Bean around to tell us about these things.

>glomp<

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gmjhowe
gmjhowe

Reply 11 years ago

 >Glomps all three of you<

GLOMP PILE UP!

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Kiteman
Kiteman

Reply 11 years ago

Googles "glomp", joins in.

An embrace of this kind; to embrace enthusiastically; to pounce on and hug, often from a running start. Generally feminine or childish in nature

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lemonie
lemonie

11 years ago

Were you under the influence of a certain gas or wavelengths when you came up with this?

L

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Rock Soldier
Rock Soldier

11 years ago

I really don't know anything about this subject. Could you explain please?