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"Hydronic" A/C in an enclosed overhead space condensing and weeping ruining the ceiling tiles. Answered

In an historic building, a remodel installing a chill water A/C air handler into a ceiling space now completely enclosed, is experiencing severe condensation and weeping onto the drop ceiling tiles. 
I suspect a building code violation; "non vented installation". I am guessing a small powered fan/blower, cycling the air in the over head enclosed space with the "air-conditioned" environment. I am just guessing...  I would be honored to receive expert advice.

Thank you,
Calvin Rodriguez
858-382-9692

Discussions

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onrust
onrust

9 years ago

It could be a plugged condensation line leaking back into the unit.... or it may have a pan under it that is draining......but now has a leak due to vibration. Good luck

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lemonie
lemonie

9 years ago

You need to look at it and find out where the water is coming from.

L

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watchmkr1
watchmkr1

Answer 9 years ago

It is clearly condensing on the surface of the cold pipes and dripping from there.
There is no mystery as to the origin of the dripping water, my problem is in the cause and solution of excessive humidity unique to the enclosed mechanical space as opposed to the modest and even low humidity of the "occupied space"

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lemonie
lemonie

Answer 9 years ago

If it is clearly condensing on pipes then the insulation on them is inadequate (Re-design). I would have them properly insulated.

L

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Re-design
Re-design

9 years ago

All cold lines, ducts etc. are supposed to be insulated to prevent this. I'll bet the contractor didn't insulate properly OR there is a drip pan under the unit the may be stopped up or not even connected to a drain line.

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

Answer 9 years ago

+1.
AND IF there is a drip pan and its not connected to a drain, there are special pumps to push it out of the way, even if there is no "fall" to a drain.

You'd get a pump (and all the insulation you need) from your local AC supply house. Over in the UK, we use "Armaflex" insulation for AC installs, I don't know the American equivalent.

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watchmkr1
watchmkr1

Answer 9 years ago

Thank you , insulation is in fact inadequate, and the only drip pan is for the coil condensate(functioning fine)

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caarntedd
caarntedd

9 years ago

As far as I know, there will always be condensation. The water needs to be caught in a tray of some kind, and piped away to waste.

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watchmkr1
watchmkr1

Answer 9 years ago

I am actually seeking a knowledge base on the construction codes for this type of installation