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what do you use to protect your rechargeable batteries while charging? Answered

I got this off ebay (see attached image).  But it just flashes extremely fast between red and blue when charged (which is obnoxious since I can see it - you would not want this charging in your room at night, it's like a crazy strobe).  Another from a different seller just lights both red and blue at the same time. 

Does anybody have other suggestions for what to use?  I don't need it to have lights.  Thanks.

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I have several of these modules and when I connect it to my LiPo battery the blue light goes out and the red comes on and stays on until the 18650 is charged. And once fully charged the red light goes out and the blue light comes on (some modules have green instead of blue) There is never any strobe effect. And these are only for charging Lithium batteries which are very demanding. This charging module's Input voltage must fall between - 4.5V-5.5V and it stops charging the battery when the full charge voltage reaches 4.2V so there's no way it could charge a 9v for instance. Is this info helpful at all?

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aliasjanedoe
aliasjanedoe

Reply 5 years ago

I'm using USB and Lithium batteries. So I guess I either have bad charging modules or bad batteries, although I'm assuming it's not an issue with the batteries since they seem to otherwise work fine.

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Downunder35m
Downunder35m

Reply 5 years ago

I am leaning out of the window quite far here and assume you either use a UBS port from laptop / PC or a USB phone charger for the job.
If so then there might be your problem.
A standard USB port will only deliver 500mA.
And some USB charger don't like fast changing loads.
The regulator circuit in them always expects some load and regulates the output voltage according between 4.8 and 5.5V approx.
Your charger will will change from full to basically nothing very fast during the charging cycle - this can upset our supply.

As a short term fix tray to add a really big electrolytic capacitor (like 4700µF or more) between supply and module - this should be able to filter out most of the load changes.
And if in doubt connect the module to 3 1.5V batteries (fresh and best d-Cells) to check if the module is still having problems.
Last but not least you can cover the LED's are replace the resistor to reduce their voltage so they are less annoying.
Adding a capacitor parallel to the LED might also stop the flashing to a great degree.

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aliasjanedoe
aliasjanedoe

Reply 5 years ago

I'm using one of these:

Usbwalloutlet.jpg

Don't throw those modules away I doubt they are bad. I wish there was a way to get a regulated 5 volts to the module rather than use the USB.

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aliasjanedoe
aliasjanedoe

Reply 5 years ago

But they're meant for using with USB (they have the USB plug right on them), so I'm confused as to what you're saying the problem is.