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what would happen if all the boats in the world was out of the water all at once? Answered

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Kiteman
Kiteman

10 years ago

A lot of barnacles would die.

PS - if you don't get in the habit of using the reply button properly, you will irritate a lot of people, who will then treat you as a troll.

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kelseymh
kelseymh

Answer 10 years ago

See his Orangeboard. He is a troll.

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Kiteman
Kiteman

Answer 10 years ago

>Sets filters to monitor.

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rickharris
rickharris

10 years ago

Commerce will stop - all the docks in the world will be full several times over, a lot of seamen won't get paid.

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kelseymh
kelseymh

Answer 10 years ago

WARNING: NSFW Response

Gee, Rick. And here I thought it was the seamen doing the paying...

>ba-da-bing<

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rickharris
rickharris

Answer 10 years ago

Often is (I have heard!) :-)

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The Jamalam
The Jamalam

Answer 10 years ago

Think about the massive volume of the ocean, and the comparably minuscule volume that the boats would displace. The water level would drop very slightly, but due to ocean currents, waves etc. the water level is never uniform, so it would be impossible to measure by how much.

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kelseymh
kelseymh

Answer 10 years ago

In principle, satellite measurements could do the trick, but the value is tiny compared to their resolution.

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kelseymh
kelseymh

Answer 10 years ago

You still haven't figured out how to click on REPLY, have you?

Arithmetic and research can solve your problem.

1) Search for "worldwide shipping" and get an estimate of the "displacement" of all boats involved. That number, which is how the size of ships is measured, tells you the mass (weight) of the ships, and therefore the mass of water equal to (displaced by, according to Archimedes principle) them. Chances are, Wikipedia can give you this number directly.

2) Find the total surface area of the world's oceans. This is obvious something you can find trivially, most easily using Wikipedia.

3) Look up the density of the ocean (another trivial number you can find). Combining this with (1) and (2), you can calculate the depth of water displaced by worldwide shipping.

4) Compare that number with, for example, the height of typical water waves as they roll up the beach. Would you be able to measure the change?

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

Answer 10 years ago

immeasurably.

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kelseymh
kelseymh

10 years ago

Nothing measurable.