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where can I buy non-conductive (or clear coated) ultra fine copper wire? Answered

I'm looking for a very thin, non-conductive, copper wire. Although I've been told this is impossible to find and wicked hard to make, so something clear coated would also be acceptable, but I want an ultra fine gauge. I also want it to be solderable. Anybody know where I can find some?

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Kiteman

10 years ago

I think you mean insulated (there is no such thing as non-conductive copper).

Look for magnet wire or enamelled wire.

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aliasjanedoeKiteman

Reply 10 years ago

I thought the same thing until I found some inside a toy I took apart. But I've been told I won't find any to buy, so I've edited my post to include coated wire. And I'll try googling your suggestions, thanks.

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Kitemanaliasjanedoe

Reply 10 years ago

If you want some quickly and cheaply, take a wall-wart apart and unwind thw wire in there. It looks like plain copper, but has a clear, insulating varnish over it. However, soldering usually burns the varnish off.

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The IdeanatorKiteman

Reply 10 years ago

Solder doesn't usually, I have to set it on fire to do anything

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The IdeanatorKiteman

Reply 10 years ago

Not fussy, soldering will not affect the copper's coating, for me at least.

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KitemanThe Ideanator

Reply 10 years ago

Excellent news then - it looks like all aliasjanedoe needs to do is raid a wall-wart.

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The Ideanator

10 years ago

Magnet wire (what youre talking about) can be found in numerous places, tv's/crt monitors, headphones, transformers, inductors, etc.

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lemonie

10 years ago

How thin in fractions of a mm / inch and how much? E.g. small headphones have fine wire of this sort, also small motors, transformers (hard to take apart though) L

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kelseymh

10 years ago

As Kiteman said, there is no such thing as non-conductive copper. Copper is a metal at room temperature and standard pressure. That means that it has more electrons than are needed to fill all of the orbitals below the Fermi level, and has excess valence (or conduction) electrons. The latter are what flow through the material in response to a voltage difference.

In the U.S., besides "magnet wire," you can also look for "bell wire," which is equally thin (28-30 gauge or smaller), and insulated with an enamel coating rather than with vinyl.