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wool : how do i now if it is total wool Answered

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canucksgirl
canucksgirl

9 years ago

I know there's suppose to be a method of burning a sample piece of cloth, where the residual material would allow you to determine the percentage of wool to any synthetics. Unfortunately, I don't quite know what the process is, or what you should look for, but perhaps you can Google it, and find the answer you need.

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Denger
Denger

Answer 9 years ago

Try the burn test first: when pure wool burns, it smells like burning hair and leaves a fine powdery gray or whitish ash. Synthetics will bubble or drip and smell like, well, melting plastic, leaving behind a nasty, crusty residue. If the textile yarn in question is mostly wool, (for example 90% wool, 10% Spandex) this can be a bit tougher to determine by just burning, and you may have to resort to steveastrouk's solvent solution, below.

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

9 years ago

As ooposed to containing plastics ?

Dissolve a sample in a sodium hydroxide solution - no sample left, its all wool.

Steve

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lemonie
lemonie

Answer 9 years ago

That would probably produce the same result with polyester(?)

L

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lemonie
lemonie

Answer 9 years ago

Or Nylon, but you don't tend to find wool / Nylon blends.

L

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steveastrouk
steveastrouk

Answer 9 years ago

Some other solvent ?

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lemonie
lemonie

Answer 9 years ago

You'd have an elemental-analysis, specifically for nitrogen*.

L

*protein content

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Kiteman
Kiteman

9 years ago

Have a go at a small piece with a flame (such as feed the end into a candle flame) - if you get melting, or even dripping, then it's plastic. Pure wool is harder to light than synthetics.

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rickharris
rickharris

9 years ago

If you can't tell it doesn't matter!