Freaky Food Fun

Why has no one thought of this before?Granted, I don't usually have pasta with my hot dogs, but darn it! I will now!Hotdoghetti anyone?VIA: boingboing

Topic by scoochmaroo   |  last reply


Peep Experiments

Peeps. The fun, delicious little marshmallow chick, bunny, snowman, pumpkin, etc. that we get on Easter (or near Easter for the people who don't celebrate it.) But after Easter, when you have so many of them, what do you do with them? I know you can eat them or explode them in the microwave, but I need is a better idea. Have any?

Topic by carpfluff   |  last reply


Hunting

What do you think I should do? I think I spooked a monster buck off my property. (A 12 point) I have been keeping my eye on him during the off season but now he has disappeared.

Topic by Pat Sowers   |  last reply


What Food ( Mostly Healthy ) Should Be Served ?

The immediate families are now tracking my Best Answer count. And said  "let's have a party at 100, what sort of food ?" We live in a mountain desert state.  I don't think there's any rush...................  A

Topic by iceng   |  last reply


Scoochmaroo's Salad Challenge... Game on!

In case you're unaware, Scooch has a fabulous Salad Challenge going on this week! (until 11:59 pm (PST) on Wed night. August 31st) She's offered some SUPER prizes that anyone would love to have in their kitchen. This is a great opportunity for you to get better acquainted with other members, too!  Check it out at: https://www.instructables.com/id/Scoochmaroo-Challenge-Salad/ I'll sweeten the pot and give a 3-month Pro Membership to the next 5 people who enter a salad recipe!  More entries mean more prizes!  You can't win if you don't play... so what are you waiting for??? ;-D 

Topic by bajablue   |  last reply


BBQ Contest

No BBQ contest this year? Last years was so much fun.

Topic by branonls 


Science In Food

I love creating food its even more fun when science is involved. Anybody have some cool recipes to share?

Topic by FlatLinerMEDIC   |  last reply


Contest Rules? My husband joined Instructables -- Answered

My husband joined Instructables because he saw how much fun I was having. Now, he's threatening to actually COOK so he can join in on the Contest Fun. Is that allowed? Could we each win a prize in the same contest?  I'm not thrilled about sharing my kitchen... not to mention hiding my recipe ideas under lock-and-key and experimenting with them while he's hand-cuffed out in the barn!!!

Question by bajablue   |  last reply


Gluten and Dairy Free Treats

I am new here but would love to see if anyone has fun foods for a gluten/dairy free household! We are so much happier without that in our house and would love to see other posts on this topic.  Especially lunch ideas for high school lunches.

Topic by the.bead.rolls.on   |  last reply


Branson, MO's Great American Pie Show

Do you make a great pie? Branson, Missouri, is hosting a big, new pie recipe contest. The Great American Pie Show will be held April 24-25, 2009 in conjunction with two Taste of Home Cooking Schools scheduled in Branson on those days! Your favorite pie recipe could win you one of several prizes, including a first prize of $2,500 cash, plus a trip for two to Branson for a fun vacation. Great American Pie Show finalists will be invited to come to Branson on April 24 and 25, when their pies will be judged. Winners will be announced at Taste of Home Cooking Schools. To add more fun and excitement, Al Roker of NBC’s Today show will be a celebrity judge for the Pie Show! You can enter in any of four pie categories—Fruit, Nuts, Refrigerator/freezer and Pudding/cream/custard. The link below will take you to details, rules and the easy entry form. Good luck! Great American Pie Show www.explorebranson.com

Topic by bransoncvb 


Unconventional Potato Salad

Do you love a potato salad that's out of the norm? Olive oil, or mayo? Heavily spiced, or simple? This one by The Kitchn, with kalamata olives and parsley, got me thinking. How far out of the envelope can you go with potato salad? A family member makes a fantastic one with bacon bits and dill. I've never made potato salad, and I'm curious what fun combination are out there.

Topic by garnishrecipes   |  last reply


What are you thoughts on this? Answered

A new Forum Category called The FLOPHOUSE... or? I'd love to see a place for members to relax, share photos and generally commiserate and laugh over Intsructables-gone-wrong. It could be a whole lotta fun! My most recent flop (pictured) involved Grilled Pork Tenderloin marinated in a Pineapple chipotle sauce. It looked SO good and tasted SO WRONG! lol... I'm still tweaking a different grilling recipe so the Grillmaster won't catch his or herself on fire. 8-/  What are your thoughts on this?

Question by bajablue   |  last reply


Play a Collaboration Game?

Oh my... Coffee beans!.Let's try this again! ..Challenge: Oh my! I lost my precious special coffee beans! I need to travel around the world searching for them. Will you help me stay awake for that? I will need loooots of coffee for my mission ;)Design a new coffee filter! Collaborate and innovate together - find a new way to filter coffee. Do not use anything expensive and try not to create too much waste ;) Let's go!... How does this game work: 1) First collect ideas for a coffee filter here under this thread until Monday, March 04th midnight PST - write down what you think would work, freely. (Add in to the already collected ideas - challenge yourself!)2) Look at and discuss others' ideas here, while they are being collected.3) Select one idea that you like, and form teams - prototype together, form an Instructable, make it Collaborative. Or alternatively, just add in your existing Instructable and make it Collaborative. Innovate together! A very rough prototype that shows the principle is sufficient. The time limit for this step is to be announced - not more than several days. 4) Collect the 'ibles here under this thread (or I could make a collection of 'ibles if possible) 5) Let's vote and see which new coffee filter is the best! Try to win the most votes and be on the 'podium'!...I will always be around here - you could ask me anything and also give feedback :).Disclaimer: This is part of a research for my PhD at Istanbul Technical University, department of Industrial Design. The research is strictly non-commercial, only for academic purposes and not financed in any way. The only objective of this game is to encourage collaboration and innovation in communities, in a playful and fun way. Your ideas and identity will not be used or revealed, and your privacy will be protected. Thank you. e-mail: meric.taylan@gmail.com.

Topic by merictaylan   |  last reply


Care Package

My parents know that I have been trying to save money, so they sent me this nice care package for easter to provide me with much needed sustenance. Lets see whats inside... 1. A bag of fun size skittle packets, Sweet! They remembered my skittle addiction. 2. 6 single serve Jif peanut butter cups 3. Edible easter grass ... o.k? 4. Some laughing cow babybels and spreadable swiss 5. A hickory farms ham and crackers ... this is getting kind of weird 6. 5 little strawberry candies 7. About fifty single serve splenda packets (err...) 8. A bunny basket with creepy eyes What a strange selection of goodies. If any of you wondered where I got my weirdness from, you now know.

Topic by Tetranitrate   |  last reply


If You're A Good Cook, You Definitely Want To Enter This Contest

Recipe Contest - $250 Whole Foods Gift Card! I just wanted to give everyone the heads up about a cool online contest I just found out about that is ideal for foodies. All you have to do is enter your best recipe for a chance to win a $250 gift card to Whole Foods. The contest is via www.greenwala.com, which is an online green-themed social network.The Greenwala community will vote on the top three finalist entries, so you can increase your chances of winning if you get your friends to join and vote for you. Plus, for every new member who signs up, a tree will be planted in their honor courtesy of the non-profit group Trees For The Future, so that's a nice bonus right out of the gates. They have a few other contests going on, too -- something fun for everyone: http://www.greenwala.com/greenwala_contests

Topic by elizahleigh   |  last reply


instructions/recipe for a totally edible popcorn shelled pinatas?

   When I was a kid I remember every year we had a Popcorn Pinata at Grandmas. I'd like to make one for the kids at Church. And maybe start the tradition agian. All I remeber is it was a big hollow popcorn ball that was actually two half somehow glued together and it was pretty tastey too. I tried once before to guess at how to make it. Heres what I used and the probelms with it. Light Corn Syrup and popcorn two metal bowls and wax paper to lift it out with. The probelms were; it didn't hold it's shape taking it out (so it sure wont hold up to a beating). I'm not sure how I would go about making a loop or something stirty enough to hang it from either if it did harden enough. Also, I remember some years it was impossible for us kids to even crack it. (but the Uncles had fun helping)  Any thoughts?

Question by MrsMcArt   |  last reply


What a surprising find.

I'm brewing up a batch of cider for the holidays. Home brewing is something I used to be into and haven't done in a while, but I thought it would be fun to get back into. Way back, 8 years ago, when we moved I stored my empties in the attic. Dragging them out today I was surprised to find one of the bottles was capped. So being curious I cracked the top and low and behold it was still carbonated, after 8 years in an attic which can reach 140 degrees in the summer. As you can see from the rather blurry picture(sorry), the color is very dark, but with a nice creamy head, it was very clear, not surprising;y, the arome was strongly caramel. On the palate it was smooth and creamy like a schwarzbier. The flavor was caramel and balsamic without the vinegar (like a balsamic reduction). Discretion being the better part of valor, I spat it out and washed my mouth with Listerine. Still it was an interesting experience. Just wanted to share.

Topic by Tool Using Animal   |  last reply


Growing Veg indoor from your smartphone

Hey guys! My name is Aga, and I wanted to post an update about the project I shared a while ago. So we were looking for ways to make hydroponics fun, easy, interactive and beautiful so everyone can start growing the freshest food on earth even if they know nothing about gardening or have very little time and space.Of course we would rather garden in sun but for most of us it`s simply impossible. We are still early stages but at least now it looking good. haha! Check it out our new landing  http://getniwa.com/ We are gearing up for a Kickstarter and if our vision resonates with you would love your support! Also: check out our blog - how far we have come from the initial prototype http://blog.growot.com/ and here is me telling a bit more about the project straight from China: http://bit.ly/1eVO5Oh Thank you guys! Would love to connect with you and know what you think about the project Aga ps. this is not the spam, we are a bootstrapping startup and would love to share our solutions with the community!

Topic by Niwateam 


What was the first food-thing you ever made?

Memory is truly the most precious and valuable gift we possess.  Love, contentment, spirituality are all up there in the top 10, but without the memory of these things, they cannot be appreciated. As I was taking an enjoyable stroll down memory lane this morning, thoughts of my childhood BFF came to mind... which lead me to this topic.  I thought would be a great brain exercise and a fun discussion for us foodies. ;-)  So what's the first thing you ever made?  (Mud pies don't count. ;-) My first almost-solo (no bossy mom!) was a Cheese Souffle. I remember my bff had a duck... and the duck laid eggs... lots of them!  We found a mouth-watering Cheese souffle in some illustrated cookbook and the plan was hatched. ;-)   Like good little 11 yo girls, we waited for her mom to go to work before commandeering the kitchen.  Our creation wasn't nearly as beautiful as this one.  I recall being quite disappointed as I watched the whole thing droop miserably when it came out of the oven. lol... souffle FAIL, if there ever was one... but ya gotta start somewhere! ;-D So what was your first cooking project?

Topic by bajablue   |  last reply


Raw Living Food - Plant Based

Anyone familiar with Raw Vegan Food - or Plant-Based Lifestyle? Yeah, when I first heard it, I thought the same thing...but for health reasons was advised to explore this arena. I got bored...quickly, and so I started seeking out ways of making this healthy way of eating...FUN! I ended up falling in love with eating raw vegan! I have so much more energy than before, and so many of my gastro intestinal symptoms were alleviated. (Bloating, gas, cramping, etc). On top of this, chronic sinusitis and insomnia cleared up..oh, and my SKIN!!!  The fact is, it started out as a "must do" and ended up as a LOVE. I am now a self-taught "chef" but mostly a recipe developer and challenge myself to come up with treats that are as decadent as the original cooked and processed version...only healthy and guilt free. I did it!! I've created brownies and a line of cookies. I make kale chips in every flavor imaginable, including Chocolate, which was featured on Oprah.com, and sold in my online cafe. I can create crackers, breads, and chips, mousse and cheesecakes, and the list goes on. Right now, I'm working on a chocolate layer cake that is chewy and fudgy and unbelievably decadent!!! The excitement I feel when I create something others can enjoy is thrilling!  PS I've tried adding images multiple times with no luck!!! 2.5 years ago, I'd never have imagined myself eating to GOOD and so HEALTHY...and enjoying it all so much!  Just wondering if there are other raw foodies out there?   

Topic by Rawfully Tempting 


How do i make ethanol from sugar cane? Answered

Its cane harvest season and the railway pickup lines are littered with pre chopped sugar cane stalks that fell off the carts while loading, also every road side creek is surrounded by sugar cane which is unharvestable and for all intents and purposes, as useful as grass, so with either nobody will object to me taking them. Especially since its all on public property now anyway. Now, i want to produce as much ethanol as i can from a single batch using a 20L pressure cooker, the end use of the ethanol is for fuel, sterilization and cleaning, not drinking, infact i actually want it to produce more isopropinol alcohol if at all possible, iso is expensive and it would be fun to try to distill it out, or otherwise leave it in the end spirits. Now, i have no idea on how i can cleanly ferment sugar cane. Im going to ferment it sealed inside the pressure cooker, but first sterilize it as i dont want any other smelly volatiles to grow. also in the pressure cooker i can hook the pressure releif valve directly to the condenser. So, any idea on how i go about doing this? am i ok to just crush and chop the stalks and turn them into a dense soup, or is there a reason as to why i should need to juice them? Also do i need to add yest, and if so how much? This is as an experiment, to do it because i can and nothing more, im well aware i can easily go out and buy methanol, ethanol and isopropyl alcohol and make them that way, but this is a DIY site, who the hell here goes and buys something when they can make it themselves. So any suggestions would be well appreciated.

Question by oldmanbeefjerky   |  last reply


Beer, brewing, bottling, and CO2

This started as an unrelated comment thread on a post about freezing blueberries. It seems like such a great topic I created this forum for it. Brewers? Ideas? Beergnome: I do it for a living ;) we force carbonate as a rule. we only naturally carbonate for special order casks. our economy of scale doesn't allow otherwise.. fezrock it is possible to create a counter pressure rig for judging bottles for your homebrew, I'm sure there is an instructable for it,, if not there should be. it requires you creating an envelope of CO2 in the bottle, then having a T rig that will take the beer under pressure in the bottle with counter pressure of CO2 to keep the dissolved CO2 in the beer in solution. Its a bit of work, but if you care about competition at all. a clean bottle always bumps up the score. Fezrock: Nice career! I'm still quite the novice, but practice makes better! As to your question, I haven't seen anything like it. Topping the bottle out with CO2 would help the end product, but wouldn't do much for pressure loss. Nitrogen would be similar, but whichever is the heavier gas (not sure) would be marginally better for this lo-tech solution. On a small scale, if a sealed environment could be created to fit your capper around your cap, more gas pressure could be applied. I imagine an upright lever capper would be needed to work that out. Thanks for that idea seed! On a larger scale, if you could cap in a larger chamber, you could set the CO2/N2 pressure in the chamber to whatever you needed it to be. This would also give you space to insert your brew without introducing air. Or just overcarbonate the brew to make up for carbonation loss to outgassing. Crazy idea: add a small amount of dry ice without freezing the brew. (you don't need leftover yeasts anyway!) It sounds like a fun experiment, and could be adjusted to suit your pressure needs.

Topic by fezrock 


Instructables Restaurant at PICNIC 2010

I was honored to be asked to open an Instructables Restaurant in Amsterdam as part of the 2010 PICNIC festival.  Faithfully following recipes submitted to our Pizza contest, chefs from Eetcafe De Zwijger served three different types of pizza in an intimate setting within the festival, next to the mobile Fablab.  Each day, the crew served around 50 pizzas split equally between Homemade Pizza Margherita, Rose Garden Pizza, and Flammkuchen - the other type of pizza. The Instructables Restaurant is a combination concept art piece and experimental business model.  What would an open-source restaurant look like?  Can an open-source menu allow patrons to form a deeper relationship with the chef and the food?  Would people show up just to learn how to do it themselves?  With funding from the Waag Society, the creators of the restaurant, Arne Hendricks and Bas van Abel, are trying to answer these questions.  With my permission, they chose to leverage the Instructables brand in their initial "pop-up" restaurants, which have included a Cheesecake cart, DIY BBQ, and a soup night in addition to the Pizza restaurant -- all described on their Instructables Restaurant Blog. The space created for the restaurant at Picnic was great, and probably better than any live event I've ever organized for Instructables.  Two things that worked really well deserve to be specifically pointed out:  handing out comment sheets with each slice of pizza, and tear-away handouts with the recipes and instructions for furniture and decorations.  In one of the images below, you can see a collection of comments about the pizza submitted by tasters.  The handouts had links to the website and short forms of the step-by-step instructions emphasizing that anyone could make the pizza, furniture, or lighting themselves.  (The pads of handouts were especially appealing to me, because literally the next day at NYC Maker Faire, the wind was threatening to blow our business-card-format project cards all over.)  Scanned versions of the handouts are included in the slideshow below: See this slideshow here:  Instructables Restaurant Handouts Arne calls the Instructables Restaurant a "question."  If the answer to his question is yes there is something to an open-source restaurant, he has a spot in mind for a fixed-location version.  I can't wait to eat there. A brief aside: I'm a few inches above average height in the US, but in Holland, I'm short! The Dutch are enormous, as you can see in the group image with the five of us at the restaurant. Looking up to meet people's eyes was an interesting and fun change. More images of the Instructables Restaurant here on Flickr.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Antibiotic resistance and factory farming

Want to know where the latest MRSA strains are coming from?Not the hospitals- it's factory farms. I know the basics of antibiotic use in factory farming, but seeing the statistics is still appalling. It makes me particularly happy to have scored 55lbs of venison from my uncle this weekend.The bit on testing reminds me of the bit about Mad Cow- US farmers who want to test 100% of their livestock aren't allowed to basically because 1) it would make the untested animals look bad, and 2) they might find something. One BSE-infected cow (or at least proof of such) could shut down US beef exports entirely. Anyway, back to MRSA:The Union of Concerned Scientists estimates that at least 70 percent of the antibiotics used in America are fed to animals living on factory farms.Raising vast numbers of pigs or chickens or cattle in close and filthy confinement simply would not be possible without the routine feeding of antibiotics to keep the animals from dying of infectious diseases. That the antibiotics speed up the animals' growth also commends their use to industrial agriculture, but the crucial fact is that without these pharmaceuticals, meat production practiced on the scale and with the intensity we practice it could not be sustained for months, let alone decades.Public-health experts have been warning us for years that this situation is a public-health disaster waiting to happen. Sooner or later, the profligate use of these antibiotics -- in many cases the very same ones we depend on when we're sick -- would lead to the evolution of bacteria that could shake them off like a spring shower. It appears that "sooner or later" may be now. Recent studies in Europe and Canada found that confinement pig operations have become reservoirs of MRSA. A European study found that 60 percent of pig farms that routinely used antibiotics had MRSA-positive pigs (compared with 5 percent of farms that did not feed pigs antibiotics). This month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published a study showing that a strain of "œMRSA from an animal reservoir has recently entered the human population and is now responsible for [more than] 20 percent of all MRSA in the Netherlands." Is this strictly a European problem? Evidently not. According to a study in Veterinary Microbiology, MRSA was found on 45 percent of the 20 pig farms sampled in Ontario, and in 20 percent of the pig farmers. (People can harbor the bacteria without being infected by it.) Thanks to Nafta, pigs move freely between Canada and the United States. So MRSA may be present on American pig farms; we just haven't looked yet.I love Michael Pollan's work. If you haven't read The Omnivore's Dilemma you should. Many of his books started as pieces for the NYTimes magazine: here's a list of books and articles, with links. He's much more of a storyteller than a straight-up reporter, and despite the often dire subject matter his stories are simply fun to read. He's also a journalism prof at UCBerkeley right around the corner from Instructables.

Topic by canida   |  last reply