eco-friendly exit signs?

Hey, I´ve been reading a lot about green technology lately and while doing it I came across something that really surprised me - nuclear powered exit signs. I had already known that both cars and trains, for example, can be nuclear powered but I didn´t realize that an exit sign can use no electricity, even when it´s self luminous. Apparently it doesn´t require any wiring or batteries so I started thinking how I could make an exit sign myself. Btw, does anybody know anything about the regulations as far as the material used in fire exit signs is concerned?

Topic by protosign 


Eco-freindly contest should only contain eco-freindly instructables

I noticed that in the new discover green science fair for a better planet contest, that there are unrelated instructables being posted. I've found that for a lot of contests unrelated instructables are posted so that more people will see the instructable. I know that everyone wants lots of people to find their instructable, including me, but posting unrelated instructables in contests that have nothing to do with what the instructable being posted is can be mis-leading and annoying. I don't know if anyone else feels this way, but if you do please post on this forum topic.

Topic by Mr. M    |  last reply


A safe, economical, eco-friendly solution…

Paving the ecology foundation for our future generations… With technology advancement, population explosion and improved living standard come environmental issues: 1. Excessive unmanaged waste; 2. Increased water and air pollutions; and 3. Great resources and energy consumption .. Is this the world we want to leave it for our children to inherit? Follow me to learn more

Topic by GearUp 


Anyone Know About Green Wood Stains

I've been thinking about redoing a bass guitar and I was looking into different stains when I came across this environmentally friendly wood finishing stain.  So this stuff is hugely more expensive than most products out there and I really don't know much about it.  And there really isn't that much information on it so  I was hoping someone on here might have some experience using some of this stuff.  Would this stuff work better than the chemical stains or is it just more expensive because its organic?

Topic by aninjaturtle   |  last reply


Farming - I need some help

NEW QUESTION: Should I grow food, or food and commodities (IE wheat, cotton, etc) Well, I grew vegetables last year, and the crop was a failure. Don't ask me why, since there were at least 20 things I did wrong, and on top of that, mother nature was pissed off at me. Well, I already have some ideas on how I'm going to make my farming more eco-friendly, but I'd like some more, some ideas I have are: No fertilizer (I grew organics last year too) collecting rainwater in buckets to use to water on drier days (I'm going to make a small shed which I can store the water for just such an occasion) Allowing bugs into my garden Also, I plan to compost all the plant waste (I also use my dog's "Waste" for fertilizer... weird, I know, but it works, and it means I don't have to use up plastic bags, or pick the stuff up. Plus, it's better in the ground being broken up than in the landfill taking up space) And some things I worry about are: Moving sand into the area. I hear that sand is better for beats and carrots, but I wonder if it would be a bad environmental change to move sand into the area. It's not a large area of land, but still. Please excuse me if I didn't make too much sense, I'm really confused right now... school is getting to me :(

Topic by A good name   |  last reply


Eco-Crafters -- Are You Skilled At Repurposing Trash Into Treasures?

Www.greenwala.com (an online green social network) is looking for crafty DIYers to share their repurposed project ideas with them for a future article. Might be a great way for people here to gain exposure -- here's the article link -- http://www.greenwala.com/community/blogs/all/1344-Creative-Crafters-Share-Details-About-Your-Repurposed-Fashion-Projects'''ALSO, www.greenwala.com has a few new crafty contests running, but one in particular is called "Choose To Reuse".It asks participants to photograph an original repurposed design of their own creation.Here are some examples of what other contestants have already submitted:1) vinyl record garden planters2) shower curtain turned into wearable "hoodie"3) old sink turned "hand-tiled bird bath"Take a look at the rest of the entries here and then gear yourself up to submit your own cool, repurposed design -- http://www.greenwala.com/greenwala_contests'''The most creative reuse will win a new HP Mini 110 XP Notebook and a Deskjet D2660 printer!Good luck and have fun!!

Topic by elizahleigh   |  last reply


Environmentaly Friendly Home.

I picked up my first copy of Mother Earth News. ( Absolutely loved it) It made me think what can we do in our homes and in our community to help the planet.

Topic by CrawdadMan 



Very long winded question about Trevor Baylis Eco stove? Answered

Years ago I saw a documentary about an African country which most villages and towns use bottled gas to cook. One guy had made a stove from an empty gas container that split water, using a car battery, into a usable flammable gas. It was very basic; the electrodes were nails and the amount of electricity it used was minute, (shown by a very dim bulb in part of the circuit); it worked very well, just like a normal gas stove. The guy had been kidnapped three times and his family threatened by the people who make their living from selling gas. Here was Trevor Baylis, (The man who, in 1991, saw a programme about the spread of Aids in Africa and set about developing the wind-up radio), with the guy using the stove to make a meal. Trevor Baylis was going to take this project on and allow everyone to have a very cheap and eco -friendly cooking fuel. I can't seem to find any info on it using Google....So my question is: Did this ever happen? Thank you.

Question by FriendOfHumanity   |  last reply


does anyone know how to build a kotatsu?

Just wondering if there's anybody out there who knows how to build a SAFE version of one. i'd like my house not to catch fire while i'm being eco-conscious. thanks!

Question by nerdery   |  last reply


Artists Who Make Recycled Reused Repurposed Creations -- Win Cool Stuff!

I just saw a couple of fun green-themed contests over at www.greenwala.com (an online green social network) -- maybe someone here will get lucky? I think there's something for everyone. Here are the different options:1. creatively reuse something that you would have otherwise trashed -- just submit a photo of your repurposed item along with a small description. 2. create an eco-themed t-shirt design 3. take a picture of you (or someone you know) hugging a tree 4. submit a video of you cooking your favorite healthy green recipePrizes include a $250 Whole Foods gift card, $250 in cash, a new digital camera, and an eco-friendly HP laptop and printer.Here's the link if you want to check it out: http://www.greenwala.com/greenwala_contests

Topic by elizahleigh   |  last reply


practical uses for plastic six pack holder rings? seem like they are very durable and useful.

Thought these might make good tool organizers, mesh bags, or any potential items that would be practical, useful, and eco-friendly. Discarding these without clipping the rings has had a negative impact on wildlife by entangling them, so thought would try to put them to good use and save money. There are likely many gardening, art and craft applications for these also.

Question by    |  last reply


Peach-Pit Flooring - Go Green while staying healthy!

Ever wonder what happens to those peach pits you throw out? No, I bet you don't, so here is an interesting new design utilizing the pits from peaches to create some neat flooring.http://www.luxist.com/2008/03/22/eco-friendly-flooring-made-of-peach-pits/Think "eco-friendly home design" and a lot of different options come to mind, but I'm willing to bet fruit pits as flooring isn't one of them.Alla le Roux feels differently however, and after being inspired by personal experience has started a business ( Stone Fruit Floors ) that designs and sells handmade flooring created out of peach pits. The pits are sanded down (to get rid of sharp edges and make them more comfortable to walk on) and set into the floor by hand along with glue, sand, and a resin mixture. The end result looks like a strange mix between hardwood, tile, and linoleum.Interesting... I'm not really sure what else to say about this!Check out the whole process here.Here is another gallery of the floorsSomeone has got to learn how to make these...will it be you? We can do it! Plus, you get the benefits of eating peaches!

Topic by Brennn10   |  last reply


Will grass change color like most flowers do if it grows in dyed water?

I am trying to create an eco-column for science class. My idea must be unique and I was thinking about dyeing the water and hoping that a fast-growing plant, my only idea is grass, would change colors like some flowers do. At first, I was researching white carnations because they definitely change color but realized that it would take too long to grow from a seed. If grass won't change color, are there any other fast-growing plants that will? 

Question by sminnite   |  last reply


DIY Tutorial: Make Your Own Crochet Washcloths, Bath Puffs, Etc. Most are on Instructables too

Feel free to use any of the tutorials on my blog - most are on instructables too! Reusable Crochet Washcloths:  http://handmadebyannabelle.blogspot.com/2010/04/crochet-pattern-not-your-grandmas.html Reusable Crochet Coasters:  http://handmadebyannabelle.blogspot.com/2010/02/great-crochet-coaster-comeback.html Reusable Rag Baskets:  http://handmadebyannabelle.blogspot.com/2010/07/how-to-make-your-own-rag-basket.html Good luck! Annabelle

Topic by HandmadeByAnnabelle   |  last reply


The Sting Behind the Bling - what is the true cost of a little style?

The mining of jewels is often inhumane, illegal and highly toxic. So think before you sparkle.Whether future heirloom or fun trinket, jewellery is one of life's luxurious pleasures. Even if you aren't decked out in multiple carats, a bit of bling can make you feel a million dollars. But the path your jewellery takes to reach your earlobe, neck, wrist or finger can be harrowing.Worldwide, the people - including about a million children - employed on minimal wages to mine and process supposedly legitimate diamonds, gemstones and precious metals often endure some of the worst working conditions imaginable. Toiling in Asian and African countries with little or no union support means health and safety precautions are slender at best. There's a serious risk of work-related death, injury or chronic illness as workers scratch out a living in remote mines extracting precious and semi-precious stones.This is just one article from the BBC's online magazine Thread, which I have not read before, mainly because "fashion" is not something I generally think about.Thread is the online fashion magazine dedicated to bringing you the latest in eco-fabulous style.Ethical fashion is fashion that has been made, worn and passed on in a way that looks after people, animals and the environment. The clothes we feature in Thread support this approach, making us essential viewing for fashion-conscious people who care about where their clothes come from. All clothes tick off at least one of these principles:Made and traded sustainablyMade of sustainable materialsRecycled or vintageThread shows you how to get the look you want in an eco-glam way through our unique mix of affordable fashion, exclusive videos, photo galleries and thought-provoking features.Link to full articleMagazine homepage.

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


The Kids Are Alright

Via The Sietch BlogIf I asked you if giving up your car and plane travel (permanently) was a sensible solution to global warming, most people of adult age (lets say 20+) would have a hard time doing that. However the next generation, the ones who are really going to be screwed by the ill effects of the global climate crisis see things a little differently."new generation of green teenagers are prepared to support radical measures to help the planet, says a new study.A survey of 16- to 19-year-olds by the Future Foundation found more than one in eight (13%) supported a ban on travelling by air for leisure purposes, while one in 10 say they would back a ban on cars if global warming continues to worsen.Almost 10% even say they would be prepared to take part in guerrilla activities carried out by environmental groups.Meanwhile others - primarily girls - are so eco-conscious they have developed a whole new strand of teen insecurity: "green angst", defined as anxiety about one's eco credentials. Others said environmental awareness even influences their choice of friends and partners.The report was conducted on behalf of the National Lottery to inform funding of environmental projects."It might sound like these kids have lost their minds, supporting guerrilla organizations?! But when you consider the kind of world they are going to inherit it makes perfect sense. If you knew that your parents generation was going to leave you a doomed world, you might be a little pissed. No one wants to grow up to inhabit a mad max movie.According to the study released today by The National Lottery (UK organization), half of 16-19 year olds (50 per cent) want plastic bags banned completely, 71 per cent think that unnecessary packaging on food should go, and 13% per cent want a ban on traveling by plane for leisure purposes. While a quarter (24 per cent) think there should be increases on the taxes and tolls affecting cars, one in ten is prepared to go even further and would support a complete ban on cars if global warming continues to get worse.Read more here.

Topic by TheNaib   |  last reply


Europe Turns Back to Coal, Raising Climate Fears

Europe, with its smart cars, good public transportation, and high density, is often a beacon of hope for environmentally-conscious Americans. However, since coal remains a relatively cheap source of energy (at least in the short-term...), many European countries are turning to it as oil and gas prices rise, and concerns about energy stability and independence grow stronger. Europe Turns Back to Coal, Raising Climate FearsOver the next five years, Italy will increase its reliance on coal to 33 percent from 14 percent. And Italy is not alone in its return to coal. Driven by rising demand, record high oil and natural gas prices, concerns over energy security and an aversion to nuclear energy, European countries are expected to put into operation about 50 coal-fired plants over the next five years, plants that will be in use for the next five decades. The fast-expanding developing economies of India and China, where coal remains a major fuel source for more than two billion people, have long been regarded as among the biggest challenges to reducing carbon emissions. But the return now to coal even in eco-conscious Europe is sowing real alarm among environmentalists who warn that it is setting the world on a disastrous trajectory that will make controlling global warming impossible.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Solar cookery

Hi there. I am just new to the site, I have been wanting to practice solar cookery for a while when i stumbled upon this site. Guys I am amazed at what i have found here. I live in Noosa, Australia and its a very eco minded community. I have wanted to go and build a solar oven for a while but i live in an appartment so space is limited. we have a balcony which gets a large amount of sun in the morning till about 1pm. So i have an idea to build a water heater of sorts which i would like to be able to used to preserve food in the form of jams chutneys and any jared preserve basicly ( I'm also a chef so i have a know of alot ot things i can preserve including meats ) . I think my only issue is reaching high enough temperatures to be deemed safe ( above 78 C for long periods) .  My idea to do this is to use a larger sized container say around the size of a 5 litre bucket and set up a heat sink to help the temperature to get higher longer.  For the heat sink materials i was thinking of using aluminium cans and perhaps to line the bucket with it too ( perhaps just foil instead for ease). I would like to set up and array around the bucket to help collect as much sun as possible for as long as possible and seal the entire container to help condense the water pressure to sustain the heat.  I guess i question is will a large abound of heat sinks help to heat the water significantly. any advice would be welcome and yes i wull document this when i make it on my next days off work.

Topic by jramsay1   |  last reply


The real gas guzzler: Car that turns hydrogen into electricity hits the road

Car that turns hydrogen into electricity hits the roadIntroducing the family car that runs on hydrogen and pumps out only pure water from its exhaust pipe.Honda's FCX Clarity is the world's first production hydrogen-powered 'fuel cell' car - with its own onboard power station which creates electricity to drive its motor.It has a range of 280 miles and a top speed of 100mph, yet emits no harmful pollution. And it is about to become the latest 'must-have' accessory for the Hollywood set wanting to show off their green credentials.Just the thing at a time when oil prices are rocketing to record highs. The only drawback? Finding somewhere to fill it up.The FCX is the result of nearly 20 years of research and many prototypes by the Japanese firm.It is being launched first in California where Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger has spearheaded the creation of a chain of hydrogen filling stations - as part of his environmental drive for cleaner cars. The first five customers include movie actress Jamie Lee Curtis. Honda claims the FCX offers three times better fuel efficiency than a traditional, petrol-powered car.The highly explosive lighter-than-air gas - which once kept the ill-fated Hindenburg airship in the air before its fiery end in the 1930s - is kept safely in a pressurised tank in the boot.Honda plans initially to produce about 70 of the eco-cars a year. They are initially available only to lease for around £300 a month including insurance - equivalent to a purchase price of £24,000.But Honda admits that the billions it has spent on research means that the true cost would be more like £1million per car.British motorists will have their first glimpse next month at the British International Motor Show in London's Docklands. Although there are price issues, its great to see there's development of this idea. I hope this sort of car is available for the "common man" at a "common price" soon.......

Topic by Keith-Kid   |  last reply


Make Your Own Fuel from Wine

Mark Armstrong's Alternative Fuel PhilosophyIf you don't like the vehicle or the fuel it drinks, make some of your ownIt's on every billboard, bumpersticker and street placard: Let's Green This City! Urban Streets Greening Project! Each election ushers in new green initiatives, task forces, and elementary school awareness fairs. Another press conference, another earthy guy in an organic-cotton denim shirt and red Crocs stands in front of City Hall pointing an accusatory finger at the uninspired plebes who won't join us, who won't dare follow San Francisco on the righteous path toward a greener tomorrow.Meanwhile, eco-conscious drivers can't get a drop of biodiesel in city limits, while Berkeley, Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa and other surrounding cities offer it at public pumps. (In June 2007, city authorities closed the San Francisco Biodiesel Co-op, for - get this - having too many members.) Not one public pump in San Francisco sells ethanol. The few electric car-charging stations that remain are defunct, rundown or hidden in corners of musty garages, forgotten relics of a well-intentioned but poorly executed past. Our performance so far in fostering alternative fuels - the keystone of the green movement - is not just ironic; it's shameful."You know the easiest job in the world is to be a cynic," says Mark Armstrong, lifting his head from the hood of an electric-powered 1980 Plymouth Horizon. "In order to be successful you have to do absolutely nothing." Armstrong brushes his oily hands against his oily jeans and walks to the back of a cavernous concrete-floored warehouse, through a maze of Frankensteinian inventions: an electrolyzer that splits hydrogen and oxygen fuel, junky gas cars that run on golf-cart batteries, gutted petrol engines that gulp alcohol and a Mercedes motor that bakes bread and spits out edible olive oil."What I'm trying to do here is teach people to quit complaining about what they can't get," he adds, pushing his 6-foot-2-inch frame beneath a gutted 1976 Porsche 914 that he and his students are converting to a hydrolic hybrid. "I say if we really want alternative fuel vehicles, let's get off the couch and start making them."Step 1: Build a Carmore

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply