how do you get a mouse (4legged) out of your auto?

I've seen evidence that I have a mouse in my car. I put poison in but I don't want ti to die in there & stink. Any sggestions?

Question by    |  last reply


Dangerous Local Pest, What to do ? Answered

Well the local wild coyote is boldly walking up and down our Reno street at 2pm in the afternoon, sniffing at the neighborhood house dogs leg-lift corners and bushes.  As a life rule, I figure "live and let live"... The bears and wild animals are moving into town because food is scarce in the mountains this year and our leaders admonish us for leaving garbage readily available and encouraging predation.    BUT this afternoon there was some confrontation at the fenced pen our dog uses for his duty and our dog was afraid to go out and chose to leave a large pile in our computer closet which I boldly managed to step into with both feet when starting the computer after supper.  Yes, I was prepping to do our monthly ledger but first I managed to drag brown foot prints over rugs through our bedroom to our bathroom.  After a couple hours of cleaning the most foul smelling dog poop, the monthly bills and Febreze treatment of the wall to wall rugs, we had to use a leash and collar to get our naughty pet to step out to the high fenced dog pen and let him discover it was safe ! ....  We watch preschool grand children and fear the situation.  What to do ?? ... I could rig an IR light beam trip wire to cause a servo to rattle some cans to discourage coyote walkabout in my yard but hope someone has a better suggestion ?

Question by iceng   |  last reply


How can a sonar/ultrasound pest control unit be DIY? Answered

I've seen ads for pest control units that transmit some sort of signal that drives bugs &rodents away... friend had one & she didn't even get flies... but not sure which ones really work, and so expensive..... Would love to find a DIY Instructable on this! It would save money, the environment...etc...

Question by StarrsWife   |  last reply


how can i buy or make finely chopped glass

How can i buy or make finely chopped glass to mix with plaster of paris to plug holes & cracks around the house to repel mice?

Question by askjerry.tv   |  last reply


How do I create useful fiber from lemongrass? Answered

I have a big crop of lemongrass i planted to chase off pests. i use parts of it for tea/herbs.  i would like to process the fibery stalks to weave them for mats and/or kumihimo.  

Question by hardlec   |  last reply


How do you get rid of Iowan Mice?

They eat decon like candy and still run wild like they own my Trailer! We destroyed their nests in the storage room. Sticky glue traps work but get expensive since you can't really catch more than one unless they cross that spot at the same time. These mice are running wild like they own my house! what do I do?

Question by hippieroolz76   |  last reply


Canada Set to Ban "Weed-n-Feed" Products

Re-evaluation Note REV2010-01, Uncoupling of Fertilizer-Pesticide Combination Products for Lawn and Turf Uses 2 February 2010 HC Pub: 100037 ISBN: 978-1-100-14700-0 (print version) ISBN: 978-1-100-14701-7 (PDF version) Catalogue number: H113-5/2010-1E (print version) Catalogue number: H113-5/2010-1E-PDF (PDF version) Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose 2.0 Scope 3.0 Background 4.0 Regulatory decision 1.0 Purpose This document is to communicate to stakeholders the decision to uncouple fertilizer-pesticide combination products intended for lawn and turf uses. 2.0 Scope This regulatory action is focussed on the lawn and turf uses of fertilizer-pesticide combination products on the following types of turf: Lawn turf planted in or around residences, as well as public and commercial buildings including schools and cemeteries Sports and recreational turf such as turf in parks, playgrounds, golf courses, zoos, botanical gardens and athletic playing fields These types of turf are collectively known as fine turf, which may be maintained by homeowners or by professional applicators. This regulatory action does not include agricultural uses of fertilizer-pesticide combination products (turf farms), or products that have a single active material with both fertilizer and pesticidal properties. 3.0 Background Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) regulates pesticides under the Pest Control Products Act including those intended for lawn and turf uses. All pesticide products that are registered for use and sale in Canada have undergone rigorous health and environmental risk assessments including the pesticides present in fertilizer-pesticide combinations. Pesticides are often combined with fertilizers and sold as fertilizer-pesticide combination products, which are regulated by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency under the Fertilizers Act. When pesticides are combined with fertilizer such that the two components can only be applied at the same time and to the same area, the delivery mechanism for the pesticide component is brought into question. The very nature of combination products removes the flexibility of applying the pesticide as a spot application due to the need to accommodate the fertilizer, which is designed for broadcast application to the entire lawn surface at specified times of the year. Pesticides should only be used when and where there is a need. Broadcast applications of pesticides over the whole area are warranted only for severe pest infestations that are widespread. As pest infestations are typically patchy, spot applications of pesticides to those areas are most often sufficient to ensure adequate control in turf. To be effective, fertilizers and pesticides must each be applied at the appropriate timings, which typically do not coincide. Fertilizers are most often applied in spring or early summer, and/or in late summer or fall. A spring-applied lawn fertilizer results in increased tillering and rapid growth as temperatures increase, resulting in turf of increased density. A fall-applied lawn fertilizer also results in increased tillering and may result in increased winter hardiness. The majority of pesticides found in pesticide-fertilizer combination products are broadleaf herbicides belonging to the synthetic auxin group of chemicals. This group of chemicals only controls broadleaf weeds that have emerged and are actively growing in the lawn. These herbicides are not preventative in that they will only control weeds that have emerged and they do not prevent weeds from becoming established in the lawn. Further, this group of chemicals is not long lasting in that they do not persist in the soil to prevent future weed infestations. Combination products have been purchased for their convenience and ease of use as a two-in-one product to address separate lawn maintenance issues (for example, nutrient deficiency and various pest infestations) with a single application. However, these products are unsuitable as a delivery mechanism because they support broadcast application of the pesticide when this might not be warranted. Ultimately, fertilizer and pesticide applications should be based on need. Fertilizer should only be used if the turf will benefit from additional nutrients, and pesticide should only be used as a broadcast treatment if the pest densities are sufficiently high across the area to be treated. Targeted, well-timed liquid formulations of pesticides minimize pesticide use on the lawn and turf sites. 4.0 Regulatory decision Based on consultation with the provinces, experts and registrants, the PMRA has concluded that fertilizer-pesticide combination products for lawn and turf uses do not support the goals of best practices for pest management in turf. The PMRA, in conjunction with Canadian Food Inspection Agency, is taking action to uncouple the fertilizer-pesticide combination products intended for lawn and turf uses. A date of last sale of 31 December 2012 for fertilizer-pesticide combination products for lawn and turf uses has been set in order to allow for replacement products to be made available where needed. Should situations arise to warrant the use of a fertilizer-pesticide combination product for lawn and turf uses, the PMRA will assess combination products in terms of the timing of application and flexibility to apply as a spot treatment, as well as potential risks to human health and the environment. The PMRA decision to uncouple fertilizer-pesticide combination products is not based on the health or environmental risk assessments but rather the nature of combination products. Combination products remove the flexibility of applying spot applications of the pesticide due to the need to accommodate the fertilizer, which is designed for broadcast application to the entire lawn surface at specified times of the year. Turf fertilizers will continue to be available for broadcast application when needed. Pesticide-only products will also continue to be available for lawn care use to homeowners and commercial applicators for either spot treatments of localized weed patches or for use as broadcast applications to severely infested turf areas when warranted. Although more time consuming, pest control in lawn and turf can be achieved with careful pesticide spot applications that target only the pests that are present and separate broadcast applications of fertilizers. Now if only the US were to follow suit...

Topic by AngryRedhead   |  last reply


Apartment deck child-proofing and screening in ideas?

Have an apartment desk, with 3 foot railing around it but too much space between the "rungs" for my 3 year old. Anyone have experience circumventing this and/or screening in apartment decks? Anyone know of or have experience with pre-fabricated kits for this purpose? Essentially what I'm looking for is a way to barricade the railing so that my toddler and his toys can't slip between the rails.  Also would like to screen in the porch to ward off pests and make it somewhat rain proof. Primary requirement is that the system must be removable with minimal damage to the existing infrastructure. Thanks for any help!

Question by davidchase01   |  last reply


Edible Plants? AKa Underutilized crops

So.. I like to read the Wikipedia. I don't know why. However, the other day I found a little blurb interesting. I was reading about alternative crops when I realized I was very familiar with a few of the plants on the list. I do a fair amount of Gardening here in Northern Utah, so I was somewhat surprised to find that one of the weeds which I've been pulling for 90% of my gardening experience is actually an extremely nutrious food crop. So this got me wondering, what other alternative food crops were out there. I tore through the wikipedia's list of underutilized crops, and was surprised by the number of plants that just aren't used. In many cases, I can't see a reason why such a crop isn't being used. Especially in areas where cultivation of said plant would encourage use of land that's not otherwise arable. As a for instance, I live very near the Great Salt Lake. The flood plain of the great salt lake is salt killed, however, There is a small plant that grows on the flood plain. I was told that it was edible, but it wasn't usually eaten due to both the texture and the flavour. So, I was surprised when I noticed it's scientific name on the underutilized crop list. Turns out it's a good oil seed crop, and oil is one of those things we need. The other thing I noticed is that alot of the crops were indigenious, rather then more commonly used cultivars. Indigenous crops that have evolved to survive in specific locations are, in many cases, better suited to survive in local areas then food crops developed through artificial selection. Utilizing indigenious plants helps mitigate the impact of agricultural activity on the environment (which is arguably more destructive then any other industrial activity), and helps to reduce pests of popular cultivars. So with that all said, I'm interested to see what other people have donee along this line of thinking. I've noticed an instructable or two that have done just this. I'm probably put one up at the end of this year. Mine will be focusing on Common Pigweed and White Goosefoot (scientific names are in the links to the wikipedia at the bottom). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Underutilized_crops http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amaranthus_palmeri http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Goosefoot

Topic by Qcks   |  last reply