JAWsome

Simply 3-D print these parts and you're almost half way there!

Step 1: What You'll Need to Get Going!

So here is the list (and a bit of advice)...

- 2 x 9V batteries wired in series (one positive end soldered to one negative end)

- 2 x 12V solenoids (in order to connect to a bread-board you'll need to solder push-pin wires to the wires of the solenoids)

- Speaking of bread-boards and push-pin wires it'd be a good idea to have a few of those handy and available

- 1 Arduino Uno

- 2 x Relays

- 1 x Arduino Touch

- 1 x Air regulator (For this I used a regulator to control the flow from 0-30 psi)

- 1 x air source (I used my air compressor for my car tires)

- 4 x 1/8" NPT brass barb to 1/4" screw-in male connections

-1 x 1/8" NPT brass barb to 1/2" screw-in male connection

-1 x 1/8" NPT brass barb to 1/8" barb connection

- 1 x quick-connect male end to 1/2" screw-in male connection

- 1 x 25' x 1/8" silicon tubing

Step 2: Putting This Bad Boy (or Bad Girl) Together

- First pick a nice location for the relays on the bread-board. Make sure each pin of the relay has its own row on the bread. I did this by so that the signal pin was on row 16 and 27, ground was connected to rows 17 and 28, and positive was on rows 18 and 29. (this step may very depending on the order of the pins on your relay).

- So next you're going to need to connect some push pins to pins 6 and 7 on the Arduino. Using the push pins connected to the Arduino, connect pin 6 on the Arduino to pin signal pin 16 on the bread board. Then using the other push pins connected to the Arduino, connect pin 7 on the Arduino to pin signal pin 27 on the bread board.

- Next connect a push pin into the ground on the Arduino to the ground rail on the bread-board. Continue to connect the ground pins on the relays (pins 17 and 28) to the ground rail on the bread-board using push pin connections. Now go grab that battery pack you wired together and connect the negative end to the ground rail on the bread-board as well. You'll also need to connect to 'com' or 'common' end to the ground rail using the same push pin connections

- If you thought that was it, don't worry there's plenty more. Next you'll need to power this puppy up using the positive end of battery and connecting a push pin to the power rail on the bread-board. Continue to connect the ground pins on the relays (pins 18 and 29) to the power rail on the bread-board using push pin connections. Now grab those fancy solenoids and connect one end (pick an end any end will do) to the power rail and the other end to the 'NO' or normally-off end of the relay.

- Now lets wire that touch sensor up, fist connect the signal pin of the touch sensor to pin 3 on the Arduino. Then connect the ground pin to the ground rail on the bread-board. Finally and I mean finally connect the power pin to the 5V pin on the Arduino.

Step 3: Making the Shark

-First hot glue the small end of the actuator to the base end of the tail fin.

-Connect one end of the 1/8" barb to barb connector to one of the holes on the actuator, repeat this step for the other hole on the actuator.

- Next drill two 1/4" holes at a 45 degree angle from the base of the top half shark to one of the sides.

- Now cut two equal lengths of the silicon tubing (I went with 5' but feel free to make it longer ;). Then feed one of the tubes through the drilled holes on the top half of the shark and connect the end sticking out the base to the adjacent end of the 1/8" barb to barb connector on the actuator. Repeat step for other tube and barb connector.

- Place a bit of hot glue on the base of top half of the shark and push together the base to the actuator.

- Feel free to paint the top half of the shark grey so it can really look fierce.

- Now connect the 1/8" barb to 1/4" screw-in male connectors to the ports on the solenoids. Simply screw them in and your almost ready to go.

- Lets connect up those other barbs to the air regular. First connect the quick connect to the intake side of the regulator and the 1/8" barb to 1/2" screw- in male connector to the exhaust side of the regulator.

- Using the silicon tubing connect the a small piece to the 1/8" barb on the regulator and connect the free end to and 1/8" T-junction. Using another small piece of tubing connect one end to the solenoid intake port to the a free end on the 1/8" T-junction. Repeat this step for the solenoid.

-Now you're about ready to plug and play. Connect one of the free ends of the silicon tubing on the shark to the free end of the solenoid. Repeat step for other tube.

Step 4: Hacking Into the Arduino

Here's the typed code for the Arduino, read the //comments for details on what each part does

int TouchSensor = 2;
int LeftRelay = 6;

int RightRelay = 7;

void setup() {

// initialize the touchsensor pin as an input:

pinMode(TouchSensor, INPUT);

// initialize the relay pin 6 as an output:

pinMode(LeftRelay, OUTPUT);

// initialize the relay pin 7 as output

pinMode(RightRelay, OUTPUT);

}

void loop() {

if (digitalRead(TouchSensor) == LOW) // activate solenoids if touch sensor is pressed

{

digitalWrite(RightRelay, LOW);

digitalWrite(LeftRelay, HIGH); // actuate left

delay(500); // 0.5 second delay

digitalWrite(LeftRelay, LOW);

digitalWrite(RightRelay, HIGH); // actuate right

delay(500); // 0.5 second delay

}

else // deactivate solenoids if touch sensor is not pressed

{

// soleniods off

digitalWrite(LeftRelay, LOW);

digitalWrite(RightRelay, LOW);

Step 5: Take It Out for a Test Drive!

Share

    Recommendations

    • Plastics Contest

      Plastics Contest
    • Optics Contest

      Optics Contest
    • Make it Glow Contest 2018

      Make it Glow Contest 2018

    Discussions

    0
    None
    DIY Hacks and How Tos

    6 months ago

    Cool project. If you want to make the video easier for people to view, you can upload it to a site like YouTube and then embed it on the page of your instructable. You can do this using the Embed video tool in the step editor.