43 Ways to Improve Your Minecraft Houses and Worlds

Published

Introduction: 43 Ways to Improve Your Minecraft Houses and Worlds

Hello!

I'm Theresa and I'm going to be walking you through some simple steps to improve your Minecraft houses and worlds!

Let's get started.

Step 1: Arches/Entryways

I built some various entryways and arches.

If you look closely, you can see there are stairs and slabs hidden throughout.
(Black lines mean stairs // white/grey lines mean slabs)

1. Built with oak logs, oak slabs, and oak stairs.

2. Built with oak wood blocks and oak stairs. Could be used for an entry to a dog house.

3. Built with cobblestone walls and oak fence gates. This would look nice on a farm or ranch.

4. Built with oak logs and oak stairs. I like using this one for underground homes.

5. Built with oak logs, oak stairs, and oak slabs. Gives a sort of cross shape, could be used in a church.

6. Built with cobblestone blocks, cobblestone stairs, and cobblestone slabs. A very medieval design used for a castle

7. Built with dark prismarine blocks, dark oak fences, and cobblestone slabs. I could see it in an oriental build

There are probably many, many more ways to build arches and entryways, but these are the ones I came up with.

(Yes, I am aware that I messed up on #1 and made a slab with a black line. I'm sorry)

Step 2: Doorways

Using three of the main tree types, I built some doorways.

(Black lines mean stairs // White lines mean slabs.)

Oak-

1. Built with oak logs, oak door, and oak slabs. A slight overhang in the front gives the build a feeling of depth.

2. Built with oak logs, oak doors, oak stairs, and oak slabs. An indent above the door.

3. Built with oak logs, oak stairs, and oak slabs. Slabs above the door add a small gap, maybe a window. The stairs at the very top are placed upsidedown for a larger indent.

Spruce-

1. Built with spruce logs, spruce slabs, spruce door, and cobblestone walls. The walls give the feeling that the overhang is being supported.

2. Built with spruce logs, spruce stairs, spruce slabs, spruce doors, and cobblestone walls. The stairs hold up the slabs, making a window space.

3. Built with spruce logs, spruce stairs, spruce doors, and cobblestone walls. Stairs above the doors with walls on the top break up the brown tones.

Birch-

1. Built with birch logs, birch stairs, birch door, and birch wood block. The stairs beside the door give a sloping feeling.

2. Built with birch logs, birch slabs, and birch doors. Another window made with slabs.

3. Built with birch logs, birch stairs, birch doors, birch wood blocks, and white stained glass panes. The glass is a nice touch if you're planning to make the building tall. Also adds a modern look.

Oh yeah, and the last one is an open glass door that I thought looked kinda cool.

Step 3: Lighting

Lighting is essential for everything.

1a. The torch behind the item frame trick is the oldest in the book. Place an item frame on your wall, put a slab, anvil, or stair in it. Then point your crosshair on the edge of the block with the item frame on it, and place your torch.
(I'm not responsible if this does not work on the platform you play on. Don't blame me.)

1b. Glowstone behind a painting still gives off light while decorating your blank walls.

1c. When you really can't hide Glowstone with a painting, put trapdoors over it!

1d. Glowstone on the floor? Put carpets over it! If that looks weird, dig down two blocks, place your Glowstone and then place a block of glass on top.

Step 4: Dividers

Dividers can help fill that weird gap in your house, by making it seem like there is a wall where there actually isn't.

(Black lines mean stairs // White lines mean slabs)

1. Built entirely of slabs. I like the look of this one because of the subtle chain shape it makes.

2. Built of slabs and full blocks. Could even be used as an outdoor wall.

3. Built of slabs and full blocks. There's even enough space to put bookshelves on the shelves.

4. Probably the most complex. Built of slabs and stairs. Two stairs placed facing each other, one slab on either side and a row of slabs on the top.

Step 5: Cafe Tables/ Chairs

Tables and chairs. Something needed in every kitchen, cafe or restaurant.

I have a few examples using stairs, slabs, carpet, fences, glass panes, trapdoors, and pistons.

You can mix and match them any way you like!

Step 6: Chairs

The first two are a bit complex, so here's a verbal walkthrough.

1. Two stairs placed opposite each other, two more stairs placed in the corners.

2. Two stairs placed opposite each other, two full blocks placed on one side to make a chair back.

The rest are smaller chairs with trapdoors, doors, and signs in strategic places.

Step 7: Couches/Sofas

Couches can be made many ways.

A few of the ways I make them are as follows.

(Black lines mean stairs // White lines mean slabs)

1. Built with oak logs, oak slabs, and oak full blocks.

2. Built with oak slabs, and oak logs.

3. Built with signs, oak logs, and oak stairs.

The first two are my favorites because they use slabs for the "cushions".

Share

    Recommendations

    • Stick It! Contest

      Stick It! Contest
    • Backpack Challenge

      Backpack Challenge
    • Oil Contest

      Oil Contest

    Discussions