5 Old School Plumbing Tricks!

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Intro: 5 Old School Plumbing Tricks!

What's up everyone, just another plumbing tricks article and video for you guys, some of these tricks are suggestions from you guys, thank a lot and enjoy.

Step 1: BLACK THREADED STEEL

If you’re not used to working with thread black steel piping, here’s a neat trick that’ll save you time and money when working with ¾” and 1” piping. When taking your measurement, place your tape on the face of the fitting to the center of where your pipe needs to go and that’s your measurement, easy right?

Step 2: SECURE THAT PIPE

If you don’t have the right size pipe clamp, here’s an old school trick that’ll help you secure your pipe temporarily until you get the right clamp. Grab your adjustable wrench, and bend the tail-end of the clip this will make it fit a smaller pipe and will get you out of trouble at no extra cost if you’re stuck.

Step 3: NO MORE CROOKED CUTS

Whenever cutting any type of pipe, they need to be cut straight. If you don’t have a wrap around, here’s a good alternative that’ll give you similar results. Get yourself a hose clamp that fits pipe size and scribe your line to be cut, a straight line guaranteed every time.

Step 4: FITTING-SAVER

There are many ways to salvage a glued fitting as seen in my previous articles, but here’s another cool way to get it done. Get yourself a heat gun, and heat the assembly till it becomes soft enough to insert a pair of needle nose pliers in between the fitting and the pipe. The, grasp the pipe really good and twist it, it should come right out. Use this method in a well-ventilated area.

Step 5: DON'T WASTE THAT DOPE!

And as the last trick, getting to the bottom of your dope cans isn’t always easy, you could cut them in half or simply pound the can till you can reach the bottom with the brush saving you money in the long run.

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    24 Discussions

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    plumbermike

    22 days ago

    I don't know how many years you've been plumbing, in regards to gas pipe( black steel) pull your measurement from end of fitting to end of fitting add 1\2" each side totals 1" add that inch,to the measurement. Example : 10'5" cut thread your pipe 10'6", works for me every time..

    Regards to that so called pvc trick of yours, their are tools to remove the pvc or abs pipe from the fittings . Ramm bits are the most reasonably priced bits , I believe 1/2" is smallest made, not sure how big their made ,but 4" down to 3/4" is what I have.. Chuck it up in your drill, choose appropriate guide for sch 20,40 or 80 , strat drilling ,stay straight, don't drill past the stop in the fitting.. get these from plumbing supply houses only..

    In regards to your dope can trick, I just throw the can away...or cut some of the can..

    2 replies
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    grapenutplumbermike

    Reply 16 days ago

    I don't know how many different sizes of pipe you 'typically' worked with running gas lines, in regards to the instructable I like the trick that was shown because it is scalable to different size pipe. Wouldn't a fitting with larger size threads also have deeper threads? Thanks for sharing that there are actual tools for the removal of old pipe in fittings. I do really appreciate this trick, because I may be able to do something like this in the time it would take me to just hunt down the special tool; and it may be the one and only time I ever have to dig out an old pipe end...In regards to the dope trick I really liked the hammer trick, I personally don't want to get metal filings in the dope even though it was metallic dope. Obviously the can will be thrown out before the next pipe job begins...

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    plumbermikegrapenut

    Reply 16 days ago

    I cut threads by hand from 1/2"- 2". For domestic hot water boilers , with pipe runs as long as 500' over head , on the wall I've never cut a short length using my method in which I was shown by plumbers who when they got into the trade all pipe work was done by cutting threads..

    Unlike you I've got the tool at hand where I don't have to run around looking for ramm bits, I would suggest you invest in them they are very inexpensive and handy , do you know ABS pipe when heated creates toxic fumes that can kill you! Many people have died from being exposed to burning ABS fumes..besides heating any plastic would weaken and deform the fitting,

    I don't know where the metal shavings would come from, but I cut metal dope cans with tin snips, plastic dope can with a knife..

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    JulioC150mikecz

    Answer 5 weeks ago

    Let me explain. When working with threaded pipes, normally you must calculate and remove penetration of the fittings to get the right measurments. With 3/4" and 1" pipes and fittings, all you need to do is measure from the face of the fitting you are starting from to the center of your change in direction, and that is the lenght of pipe you need to use.

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    spark masterJulioC150

    Reply 5 weeks ago

    It makes no sense here to me as well, I do hear what you're saying it just does not compute. We used BP in many electrical applications up to 4 inches, (what a mess it is even with electric threaders). So now that I no longer do it, whre does the extra length magically come from?

    This is not a dig or a flame/troll. I just am not following the logic.

    One day jest fer giggles I will try the heat on PVC trick, like others I thought it literally unset the plastic allowing the edges to fuse into each other kinda like the sections of semi conducter in a PNP or NPN transistor ot a diode.

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    bpm5cmspark master

    Reply 5 weeks ago

    You'll have to excuse my drawing skills, but what he is saying is that the measurement from one thread depth to the other (A), which is the standard way of measuring, is the same as measuring from the face of one fitting to the center line of the pipe for the next fitting (B). At least for 3/4" and 1" pipe A=B, which should be much easier to measure.

    20180813_112226.jpg
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    Brian M Vbpm5cm

    Reply 25 days ago

    cheers bro! this picture made it understandable!

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    JulioC150bpm5cm

    Reply 5 weeks ago

    That is exactly what I should have done for people to better understand what I was doing! If you don't mind, i'll add this to the instructable ;)

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    JulioC150bpm5cm

    Reply 5 weeks ago

    Done, thanks a lot once again!

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    tisaconundrumbpm5cm

    Reply 5 weeks ago

    Took a little grasping, but this makes a lot of sense

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    mikeczJulioC150

    Reply 5 weeks ago

    Alright, a couple more questions. Why does this only work with 3/4" and 1" pipe, especially since 3/4" has 11 threads per inch and 1" has 8 threads per inch? Also, what if you're not working with a 90° fitting, such as a 45° elbow, or a coupling, or a motor or pump housing, or an electrical box, or...?

    I truly am not trying to start a flame war here. It's just that I owned a hardware store for 30 years and threaded pipe most of those days and while I worked for my dad for years before that. I've cut & threaded 150 pieces of pipe in one day (yeah, special ordered & used up fifty 21 foot pieces of pipe!) I've helped thousands of customers figure out how long the pieces need to be to work for their project, often with VERY little room for error. You just have to know the "rules" for figuring the takeup.

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    Goatius Maximus

    4 weeks ago

    I find myself going out to buy more fittings all the time, because someone miscalculated. This saves time and money. Good job!

    2 replies
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    JulioC150Goatius Maximus

    Reply 4 weeks ago

    Thanks a lot buddy, yes it saves time and money and the hassle of trying to find the fittings in the truck, then going to get them at the hardware store, a 4-in-1 trick ;)

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    irasch

    Question 5 weeks ago on Step 4

    Is tip #4 talking about PVC fittings? I was under the impression (possibly wrong) that the solvent cement bonds the plastic (kind of like metal welding). Does the glue actually melt?

    2 more answers
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    mtbike2 irasch

    Answer 5 weeks ago

    I don’t know exactly how it happens or works but this does work with pvc. I think it is like tearing apart wood at the glue line.....it occurs right next to it. Regardless, I have used a torch and heated a socket wrench then shoved it in a pipe to heat things then removed from fitting. Then re appplied new pipe and no leaks

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    JulioC150irasch

    Answer 5 weeks ago

    I would need to verify that, but I am pretty sure this diesn't work with cements ;)