9v Altoid USB Charger

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Intro: 9v Altoid USB Charger

Just one more 9v USB charger!

Step 1: Materials

- Altoid tin
- 5v regulator
- Wire
- Small LED
- Soldier
- Female USB
- Epoxy (i used J.B. Weld)
- Small slide switch
- Tape

Step 2: Perpare the Tin

Trace the outline of the USB on the bottom of the tin near the edge. Mark the spot where you want to put the LED. Drill it out with a drill bit slightly larger than the led. Use a drimmal to cut out the hole for the USB. Sand the surface smooth with sand paper then use a smaller girt to polish it.

Step 3: The Circuit

The circuit is very simple. The usb has 4 pins you will only use the 1st and 4th one. The regulator has 3 pins the 1st one is the ground the 2nd one it out and the 3rd one is in. Now follow the diagram.

Step 4: Assembly

Now tape around the usb near the bottom so the glue wont get in side it. tape the hole on the tin on the out side. as shown in the previous picture. Stick the usb in the hole then mix up your epoxy.spread it all around the usb. Wait till it drys then glue the LED in the hole too.

Step 5: Finshed

This is the finished product!

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    61 Discussions

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    Gomi no Sensei

    2 years ago

    Most smart phone batteries are 1500-3300mah.

    A 9V battery has 50-400mah and at 500mw load has less than 300mah capacity.

    You're also losing 30% of that 300mah thru the 7805 as heat.

    Just exactly HOW much does this remaining 210mah charge your phone ???

    Ref : http://www.powerstream.com/9V-Alkaline-tests.htm

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    coleslaw0014

    5 years ago on Introduction

    Also, for most iphones the middle two connections need to have 2V running to them for it to "recognize" it as a charging device.

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    coleslaw0014

    5 years ago on Introduction

    Diode is essential. Without it it can drain your phone's battery. Found this out the hard way.

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    None

    Hey do you know where i can buy a "soldier" radioshack doesn't carry them should i call the marines?

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    tealkrryapolov

    Reply 5 years ago on Introduction

    nope, ground have to be connected to middle pin and from last pin there is output 5v ,i ll post shematics and how to do it on my page

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    brssnklrryapolov

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    also check this post https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-get-your-iPod-to-charge-with-your-homemade-/

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    tealk

    5 years ago

    how.much exactly does regulator output? i tried 2 of them and voltage they output is 5.7-6 v. i get those from computer power suply

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    tealk

    5 years ago

    how.much exactly does regulator output? i tried 2 of them and voltage they output is 5.7-6 v. i get those from computer power suply

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    DoctorDv

    6 years ago on Introduction

    I am working on a charger and i was wondering doesn't a 9v put off too much current and won't it damage an ipod?
    -Doctordv

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    Deanozaur

    7 years ago on Introduction

    I am just wondering, since most led's I have are 3.7 volts, using even five volts will eventually ruin the led. Could you email me or post a schematic of where to add a resistor to help lengthen the life of the led, so it doesn't melt? Also, I want to add a second, brighter led that is blue. How do I attach that to the same power source (the 9v battery) and use a different momentary switch? I saw a youtube video where the guy attached 2 leds and a usb all to the same power source. I'll give you the link so you can see what I'm talking about: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVU2JmRpF58

    If you could also answer the second question in an email or post a schematic, it would be much appreciated. I already have a 100 ohms resistor, and I already own all of the led's.

    1 reply