A QUICK BATTERY HOLDER -- for Electrical Experiments

6,314

39

31

About: I'm a refugee from Los Angeles, living in backwoods Puerto Rico for about 35 years now and loving it. I built my own home from discarded nylon fishnet and cement.

Intro: A QUICK BATTERY HOLDER -- for Electrical Experiments

This is a quick way to hold wires to the terminals of a AAA or a AA battery for electrical experiments. Two modified clothespins are mounted to a 3/4" thick wood spacer. The clothespin springs maintain pressure on the battery terminals.

Two holes in each of the clothespins allow for attachment of the wires.

I just nailed the clothespins to the wood with 3/4" finishing nails. You could also use a little glue if you wish.

Step 1: MODIFY THE CLOTHESPINS

Slide one half of the clothespin sideways out from under the spring that holds it. Cut the end off one of the halves. Make sure that when the battery is in place, the terminals of the battery will make contact with and be held by the contact points on either side of the holder.

If you don't have a tiny drill bit to make the holes with, you can just drive in and pull out a 3/4" finishing nail. If the wood splits, it may still work. If it splits badly, try another clothespin. Sometimes they don't split.

Step 2: NAIL THE CLOTHESPINS TO THE SPACER WOOD

Use a 3/4" finishing nail to nail the short half of the clothespins to the spacer wood. I nailed them with the springs in place. Just be careful not to hammer the springs, and finish driving the nail with a nail set.

Step 3: INSERT THE WIRES THROUGH THE HOLES

Stick the wire through one hole and back through the other. Bend over the end of the wire to hold it in place.

The clothespins come apart easily sideways. Putting them back together is easier by sliding the tapered end in under the spring until everything snaps in place.

Share

    Recommendations

    • Electronics Tips & Tricks Challenge

      Electronics Tips & Tricks Challenge
    • Optics Contest

      Optics Contest
    • Audio Contest 2018

      Audio Contest 2018

    31 Discussions

    0
    None
    trocatintas

    3 years ago on Introduction

    Great idea! I wanted a battery holder to test voltage, so i did a little change. I glued some aluminum foil to the inside of the moving parts, in such a way that it touches the peg's coil, that way i can insert the multimeter probes through the coils holes.

    0
    None

    I've always used a couple of coins strapped to the terminals with a rubber band. The coins provide surface area to pin the wire to the battery, and the rubber band provides the tension. Very compact, and no gluing or nailing necessary.

    2 replies
    0
    None
    Grathio

    9 years ago on Introduction

    Excellent idea! I'm going to make several. As soon as I figure out what I did with my old clothes pins.

    2 replies
    0
    None
    ThinkensteinGrathio

    Reply 9 years ago on Introduction

    I wish I knew where to get the clothespins that used to be available, the ones with the really strong springs. All the ones I have found in recent years are wimps.

    0
    None
    GENIUS!!

    9 years ago on Introduction

    I LOVE MAKING THINGS SO RIGHT NOW IM TRYING TO FIGURE OUT SOMTHING I CAN MAKE JUST BY USING ONE BATTERY THANKS ALOT :)

    2 replies
    0
    None
    wobbler

    9 years ago on Introduction

    Putting heading in caps in design terms is fine. It's called "adding weight" and it allows you to discern the importance of infromation and to give a page structure. Sheesh, some people don't recognise good design when they see it! Oh yes, before I forget, great idea by the way.

    1 reply
    0
    None
    Thinkensteinwobbler

    Reply 9 years ago on Introduction

    Thanks, wobbler. I have some sign painting and advertising background. I'm also learning to tone things down some in group music making. I've been too loud before. There is a balance. I think the thing is to catch the viewer's attention without offending him. I was thinking of mixing caps and small letters, perhaps more artistically in future instructables. It's an idea to play with, anyway.