A.N.Z.A.C Biscuits

235

8

4

Introduction: A.N.Z.A.C Biscuits

ANZAC biscuits are firmly entrenched in Australian and NZ culture, so far in fact that there are laws in both nations preventing them from being called cookies! These biscuits not only draw our two great nations together, but are also deliciously oaty and buttery, and easy to make!

Supplies:

100g Butter

1 tbsp Golden syrup

1/2 c Sugar

3/4 c Unsweetened dessicated coconut

3/4 c Rolled oats

3/4 c Baking flour

1 tsp Baking soda

1 tbsp Hot water

Teacher Notes

Teachers! Did you use this instructable in your classroom?
Add a Teacher Note to share how you incorporated it into your lesson.

Step 1: History

The Australia New Zealand Army Corps (ANZACs) was a First World War army corps that was active on the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey. The landings on the Peninsular and the battles that ensued were particularly bloody and both sides suffered greatly. The Allied forces (including the ANZACs) withdrew and the Turks reclaimed the land. At this point both Australia and New Zealand were still very much part of the British Empire, and the Battle of Gallipoli is seen as the beginning of national conciousness.

Now that really is an oversimplification of the whole affair - as I'm sure you can imagine - but it is from this time that our delicious biscuit arose. Some say the biscuits were made to send to the troops as they have a long shelf life, and others say they were baked and sold at home to raise funds for the troops. Either way, this is the time that ANZAC biscuits emerged onto the national stage and became an Australian/NZ icon.

The term ANZAC is protected by law and cannot be used without the permission on the Govenor General (NZ) or the Ministry of Veteran Affairs (Aus). The biscuits are still made commerically to raise funds for Returned Servicemen, and the name can be used where the biscuits remain basically true to the original recipes.

And remember! they are BISCUITS not COOKIES! I hope that doesn't exclude me from the competition..... :)

Step 2: Wet Ingredients

The recipe for these national treats is super easy:

  1. Cut the butter into small chunks and put into a pot/saucepan with the golden syrup.
  2. Heat gently and stir until the butter is almost melted. Remove from the heat and continue to stir. You have to wait for it to cool, so it is better if it doesn't get to hot to start off with!
  3. Cool while you prepare your dry ingredients.

Note on Golden Syrup:

Golden syrup is not that common in Northen America. You can often get Lyles syrup in the international isle of the supermarket or alternatively, you can make your own. I haven't needed to do this as I have enough from New Zealand to last a little while...

Step 3: Mix and Bake!

  1. Sift your flour into a bowl and mix it with the sugar, coconut and rolled oats. This recipe works well with GF options as well - just make sure your oats are GF!
  2. Add to cooled butter/syrup and mix. Try not to eat all the dough at this stage - it is delicious, but will minimise the amount of biscuits you get at the other end :)
  3. Dissolve the baking soda into the hot water and mix it into the dough.
  4. Scoop the dough out with a teaspoon and make balls of dough.
  5. Place them on a greaed tray or baking sheet and depress them slightly with a fork.
  6. Bake at 180c/350f for 10-15 mins or till golden.
  7. Leave to cool because you don't want to burn your mouth...

Eat and enjoy!

Cookies Contest

This is an entry in the
Cookies Contest

Be the First to Share

    Recommendations

    • STEM Contest

      STEM Contest
    • Cookies Contest

      Cookies Contest
    • Magnets Challenge

      Magnets Challenge

    4 Discussions

    0
    Ronnego
    Ronnego

    Question 18 days ago on Step 2

    Is there something I can substitute for the golden syrup? Sounds delicious.

    0
    heatherjeankruzins
    heatherjeankruzins

    Answer 13 days ago

    Honey and molasses, but cockys joy is the traditional

    0
    RCEM
    RCEM

    Answer 15 days ago

    I googled around and it seems most people think light corn syurp would be ok. The other options are honey or maple syrup. Each one is different in a different way so you would probably get a slightly different result, but undoubtably still delicious! There are recipes out there for a golden syrup alternative too, if you want to make something that might be more authentic.

    1
    demosthien
    demosthien

    18 days ago

    Excellent recipe, bonus points for adding the history of ANZAC biscuits!

    It looks like you've not entered the 'ible into the Cookie competition though, or perhaps it was punted for being biscuits? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯