Arduino Alarm Clock

About: just some misfit really bored with her life

For my makerspace class, we had to build something that could help you on your daily life, using arduino.

My group thought about building an alarm clock activated by light. You can place it by the window to activate it with the sunlight, in the morning, so it can help you waking up early by playing the Mario Bros song.

So, in this tutorial, I'm gonna teach you how to build the arduino sunlight alarm clock.

Step 1: Materials

For this project, you will need:

  • an arduino uno board
  • 4 jumper wires
  • a buzzer
  • a 100ohm resistor
  • a photo cell
  • a breadboard

(sorry there's no image of the breadboard, forgot to get it when I took the picture!)

Step 2: Assembling Stuff

Okay, now it's the time to actually assemble everything into the final hardware.

You will need to put the components in the breadboard and connecting the wires to the arduino, according to the scheme and the picture.

Step 3: The Code

Then, in your arduino software, you put this code:

#define NOTE_B0 31
#define NOTE_C1 33 #define NOTE_CS1 35 #define NOTE_D1 37 #define NOTE_DS1 39 #define NOTE_E1 41 #define NOTE_F1 44 #define NOTE_FS1 46 #define NOTE_G1 49 #define NOTE_GS1 52 #define NOTE_A1 55 #define NOTE_AS1 58 #define NOTE_B1 62 #define NOTE_C2 65 #define NOTE_CS2 69 #define NOTE_D2 73 #define NOTE_DS2 78 #define NOTE_E2 82 #define NOTE_F2 87 #define NOTE_FS2 93 #define NOTE_G2 98 #define NOTE_GS2 104 #define NOTE_A2 110 #define NOTE_AS2 117 #define NOTE_B2 123 #define NOTE_C3 131 #define NOTE_CS3 139 #define NOTE_D3 147 #define NOTE_DS3 156 #define NOTE_E3 165 #define NOTE_F3 175 #define NOTE_FS3 185 #define NOTE_G3 196 #define NOTE_GS3 208 #define NOTE_A3 220 #define NOTE_AS3 233 #define NOTE_B3 247 #define NOTE_C4 262 #define NOTE_CS4 277 #define NOTE_D4 294 #define NOTE_DS4 311 #define NOTE_E4 330 #define NOTE_F4 349 #define NOTE_FS4 370 #define NOTE_G4 392 #define NOTE_GS4 415 #define NOTE_A4 440 #define NOTE_AS4 466 #define NOTE_B4 494 #define NOTE_C5 523 #define NOTE_CS5 554 #define NOTE_D5 587 #define NOTE_DS5 622 #define NOTE_E5 659 #define NOTE_F5 698 #define NOTE_FS5 740 #define NOTE_G5 784 #define NOTE_GS5 831 #define NOTE_A5 880 #define NOTE_AS5 932 #define NOTE_B5 988 #define NOTE_C6 1047 #define NOTE_CS6 1109 #define NOTE_D6 1175 #define NOTE_DS6 1245 #define NOTE_E6 1319 #define NOTE_F6 1397 #define NOTE_FS6 1480 #define NOTE_G6 1568 #define NOTE_GS6 1661 #define NOTE_A6 1760 #define NOTE_AS6 1865 #define NOTE_B6 1976 #define NOTE_C7 2093 #define NOTE_CS7 2217 #define NOTE_D7 2349 #define NOTE_DS7 2489 #define NOTE_E7 2637 #define NOTE_F7 2794 #define NOTE_FS7 2960 #define NOTE_G7 3136 #define NOTE_GS7 3322 #define NOTE_A7 3520 #define NOTE_AS7 3729 #define NOTE_B7 3951 #define NOTE_C8 4186 #define NOTE_CS8 4435 #define NOTE_D8 4699 #define NOTE_DS8 4978

#define melodyPin 3 //Mario main theme melody int melody[] = { NOTE_E7, NOTE_E7, 0, NOTE_E7, 0, NOTE_C7, NOTE_E7, 0, NOTE_G7, 0, 0, 0, NOTE_G6, 0, 0, 0,

NOTE_C7, 0, 0, NOTE_G6, 0, 0, NOTE_E6, 0, 0, NOTE_A6, 0, NOTE_B6, 0, NOTE_AS6, NOTE_A6, 0,

NOTE_G6, NOTE_E7, NOTE_G7, NOTE_A7, 0, NOTE_F7, NOTE_G7, 0, NOTE_E7, 0,NOTE_C7, NOTE_D7, NOTE_B6, 0, 0,

NOTE_C7, 0, 0, NOTE_G6, 0, 0, NOTE_E6, 0, 0, NOTE_A6, 0, NOTE_B6, 0, NOTE_AS6, NOTE_A6, 0,

NOTE_G6, NOTE_E7, NOTE_G7, NOTE_A7, 0, NOTE_F7, NOTE_G7, 0, NOTE_E7, 0,NOTE_C7, NOTE_D7, NOTE_B6, 0, 0 }; //Mario main them tempo int tempo[] = { 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12,

12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12,

9, 9, 9, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12,

12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12,

9, 9, 9, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, };

int LDR = 0; //analog pin to which LDR is connected, here we set it to 0 so it means A0 int LDRValue = 0; //that’s a variable to store LDR values int light_sensitivity = 330; //This is the approx value of light surrounding your LDR

void sing() { // iterate over the notes of the melody: Serial.println(" 'Mario Theme'"); int size = sizeof(melody) / sizeof(int); for (int thisNote = 0; thisNote < size; thisNote++) { // to calculate the note duration, take one second // divided by the note type. //e.g. quarter note = 1000 / 4, eighth note = 1000/8, etc. int noteDuration = 1000 / tempo[thisNote]; buzz(melodyPin, melody[thisNote], noteDuration); // to distinguish the notes, set a minimum time between them. // the note's duration + 30% seems to work well: int pauseBetweenNotes = noteDuration * 1.30; delay(pauseBetweenNotes); // stop the tone playing: buzz(melodyPin, 0, noteDuration); } }

void buzz(int targetPin, long frequency, long length) { digitalWrite(13,HIGH); long delayValue = 1 000000/frequency/2; // calculate the delay value between transitions //// 1 second's worth of microseconds, divided by the frequency, then split in half since //// there are two phases to each cycle long numCycles = frequency * length/ 1000; // calculate the number of cycles for proper timing //// multiply frequency, which is really cycles per second, by the number of seconds to //// get the total number of cycles to produce for (long i=0; i < numCycles; i++){ // for the calculated length of time... digitalWrite(targetPin,HIGH); // write the buzzer pin high to push out the diaphram delayMicroseconds(delayValue); // wait for the calculated delay value digitalWrite(targetPin,LOW); // write the buzzer pin low to pull back the diaphram delayMicroseconds(delayValue); // wait again or the calculated delay value } digitalWrite(13,LOW);

}

void setup() { Serial.begin(9600); //start the serial monitor with 9600 buad pinMode(3, OUTPUT); //we mostly use 13 because there is already a built in yellow LED in arduino which shows output when 13 pin is enabled } void loop()

{ LDRValue = analogRead(LDR); //reads the ldr’s value through LDR Serial.println(LDRValue); //prints the LDR values to serial monitor delay(50); //This is the speed by which LDR sends value to arduino if (LDRValue > light_sensitivity) { //digitalWrite(3, HIGH); sing(); } else { digitalWrite(13, LOW); } }

The first part, where all commands start with the '#define', is used to set up the notes that we need for the song.

Then, there is '//mario theme melody', which marks the beggining of the code to play the mario song. You can customize it if you change the song.

After that, when the bracket is closed, there are some definitions necessary for the code to work. We set up a threshold for the light to reach, so we can define when is the alarm supposed to ring.

Then, there is the final part, where we just put the command to sing the song when the light is bigger than the defined threshold.

Share

    Recommendations

    • First Time Author

      First Time Author
    • Toys Contest

      Toys Contest
    • PCB Contest

      PCB Contest

    Discussions