3D Printed Articulating Lamp - REMIXED

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About: Maker, engineer, mad scientist and inventor

Featured design on Thingiverse.com!

I started working with 3D printing in 2017, the year I got my first printer and started to venture into 3D modeling and printing.
At the time I spent more and more time in the improvised laboratory in a bedroom, doing different experiments with 3D printing and electronics. And the first challenge I faced was to print my own tools to better organize and enjoy my space. It was in this context that I decided that I needed to improve the lighting of my workbench.

I searched the internet for different models, but none adapted to my requirements. It was then that I came across with the Articulating, Wall-Mounted, Magnetic Phone Mount designed by Kenneth Haynie . And that's where this Remix started! The model, used as a mobile phone holder, has been transformed into an articulated luminaire.

With the permission of the original author, I remodeled all the pieces following a similar pattern, and after I finished and satisfied with the result, I decided to share it with the community. And to my surprise, the model was extremely well accepted and even featured on Thingiverse, one of the largest, if not the largest, platform for sharing models for 3D printing! The model became a hit with over 220,000 views, 36,000 downloads and 7,800 likes! To help users print and assemble their own pieces, I shared a tutorial here in Instructables which, to my second surprise, was awarded in the Plastics Contest of 2017 with almost 20,000 views!

And what surprised me the most is that other users started to print and create their own remixes! At the time of publication of this article, more than 60 lamps had already been produced and shared. For me, it was a surprise to know that people all over the world liked the model so much that they spent hours of their lives printing and posting versions of my project. In the end, the project has evolved to become a kind of kit, such as a LEGO-lamp, in which users can make different combinations and form different structures.

Throughout this tutorial I present my version of several of these remixes developed over the last few years to improve the use of the articulating lamp. I'll show you some remixes (made out of remixes of my initial designed, which was remixed from another design!) and the links fo the parts developed by members of the 3D printing user community, as well as detailed information for my version of each of these parts.

Although it is extremely simple, I'll show you how to assemble the lamp, and suggestions on how to combine the pieces to form different structures.


Be careful when working with electricity. Make sure there is no short circuit and just try to connect to the electrical power plug after making sure that all components are properly connected and double insulated. If you don't have enough experience working with electricity, as for others help.

Don't touch any exposed wire or any metal part of the LED lamp after it's energized! Some LED spots have a metal heat sink. Avoid touching that part when the lamp is on!

Once there are exposed wires, it's not recommend to use it places accessible to children or animals. Under no circunstances use it close to wet surfaces!

It's and experimental design, so you might use it with caution.

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Step 1: Tools and Materials

The following tools and materials were used in this project:

  • 3D printer (link / link / link). In my case I used a Voolt3D, a Grabber i3 based 3D printer. But you can't use differente models of 3D printers. Most of the parts are quite small. The larger ones will be the arms of the lamp, with up to 200 mm. Make sure that your printer has enough print area for that.
  • 1.75mm PLA (link / link / link) of different colors. I combined white, orange and blue PLA in my design;
  • Screwdriver. You'll need it for mounting your lamp on the wall and to assemble the electrical plug and switch;
  • Screws (for mouting your lamp on the wall);
  • 5W LED spotlight (link / link / link). Don't forget to check its voltage.
  • GU10 socket (link / link / link). Don't forget to check its voltage.

You'll probably need some wires, a power plug and a on/off switch. You can find it in electrical hardware stores.

The links described above are only a suggestion of where you can find the items used in this tutorial (and support my future hacks). Feel free to search for them elsewhere and buy at your favourite store.

Please be carefull when working with electricity. It might be dangerous. Some of those connectors and LED bulbs might have exposed metal parts! Don't touch it's energized and keep it out of reach from children or pets. Make sure that everything is perfectly isolated beforing turning it on. If you have no experience working with electricity, ask for help of any one with experience, or use lower voltages (e.g. 5V LEDs).

Collect everything and get ready for some action!

Did you know you can buy a Creality3D Ender for only $169.99? Get yours at https://rebrand.ly/3Dprinter-GB.

Step 2: 3D Models - Arms

In the next sections I'll tell you a little about each of the pieces used in this project. The general idea of the 3D model was based on Kenneth's Articulating, Wall-Mounted, Magnetic Phone Mount desing. Thanks, man! For this lamp I redesigned most of the parts using Fusion 360 and made some adaptations and improvements for my specific application.

You can find all files at:

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2505394

https://cults3d.com/en/3d-model/home/articulating-...

https://pinshape.com/items/40945-3d-printed-3d-pri...

https://www.myminifactory.com/object/3d-print-4369...

https://www.youmagine.com/designs/articulating-led...

The initial design had two models of arms:

  • One with two "male" ends (two threaded ends);
  • One with two "female" ends (two ends with a hole).

The idea here seemed great to me! The threaded end of one of the arms passes into the hollowed end of the other, and a knob, also 3D printed, is screwed to compress the two pieces together. Grooves and bounces on the surface of these two partes are used to lock the position of the arms.

These two models are still available and are still compatible with all other parts. However, these two types of parts slightly limit the mounting of the lamp, since one should always use an even number of arms between the lamp holder and the anchor point.

The first remix of the project was the inclusion of a new type of arm, containing a threaded joint at one end (male) and a hole at the opposite end (female). In this way, it is possible to mount the lamp with any desired number of arms (even or odd number of arms), making the structure longer or shorter as desired. Special thanks to Robert Phelps
who had the great idea of adapting the arms (link). Thank you!

Different applications may require larger spacing between the fixing point of the lamp and the object to be illuminated. With this in mind, different sizes of arms were introduced: 100, 140 and 200 mm. Any of the sizes can be combined in the construction of the joint. The idea came after Ken Mckittrick published and 8 inch long arm (link), and made realize that this might be usefull for different users.

Please also check div saW remix (link). It uses a spring between the arms and the nuts to create a self articulating joint.

Step 3: 3D Models - Lamp Holders

One of the points that had most of the remixes since the creation of this model was the lamp holder. Different users have proposed different models for different types of lamps: from incandescent lamps to 5V LED lamps.

The original design is based on the use of LED lamps with GU10 connector. You can find both lamp and connector on electrical hardware stores. The idea here is quite simple: the lamp is fitted on one side of the holder in a circular cavity, and the connector is engaged on the opposite side. This assembly makes the lamp stay fixed, without the need for additional parts.

One remix proposed here was the addition of a new lamp holder model, enabling a pair of lamps on the same holder. Thus, it is possible to achieve twice the brightness for the luminaire.

This remix was inspired in Lena Brüder design (link), which accomodates three lamps in a single holder. I thought three lamps would be too much for me, so I redesigned it for a pair of lamps only. :)

A lot of users warned me about the dangers of the exposed contacts behind the socket, and the danger of and electrical discharge. Carlos Martinez (link) and Pepe Potamo (link) proposed a lamp cover as a safety improvement. But what really caught my attention was the solution of MAILLERE Brigitte (link), who proposed a lamp cover with a round switch for turning the lamp on/off. I really liked that and decided to make my own version, in a octagonal pattern to resemble the format of the nuts used in my design. The socket is hidden inside this structure, and a round button is installed on the opposite side. There's a hole on side for the wires.

I also designed a simpler version, without a button, meant to cover the exposed contacts of the connector and avoid electical issues. As always, use it if caution even with this protective lamp cap.

The very first suggestion I received was for a wire holder for the lamp. The wires between the connector and the socket are loose, being able to entagle with the structure itself or with nearby objects. Some users solved this using some zip ties, which's just fine. But Carlos Martinez (link) presented another great solution for the problem, followed latter by Pepe Potamo (link). They devised a clip to hold the wires close to the structure of the arm itself.

Although, I wanted something simpler. So I designed my own version of the wire clip, which's easy to use, easy to print and, I hope, not so easy to break! :)

Users all around the world have proposed different types of holders for different lamp bulbs (incandescent lamps, 5V LEDs, etc.). I did not get to try these remixes, but I encourage you to try, if the lamp you want to use is different from the one I present here. Here are some suggestions:

GU10 holder (link)

E27 connector (link / link)

Ikea lamp (link / link)

Step 4: 3D Model - Fixing Point

The fixing point of the lamp was verry questioned since the birth of this project. The wall bracket was initially designed for a specific configuration in my office, where the lamp would be fitted into the gap between two wooden panels, without the need for fastening screws.

In fact this setting is quite specific and few users would find the same facility in their homes or workplaces. Thus, another model was proposed for the instalation using a pair of screws. It's made of three parts: the wall mount (which's screwed on the wall), a joint (which allows the lamp to turn 180 degrees around the fixing point), and a bolt (which is used for the instalation of the joint, along with a knob described earlier).

Soon a lot of suggestions and remixes for new support proposals appeared.

Some of them used Johann Joe's G-Clamp desing as reference, like the ones proposed by Morten Thorsen (link) and Tim Hespel (link). They both look great!

This type of support is very versatile, since it can be installed on tables and other flat surfaces, including in the 3D printers themselves (a popular assembly among printer owners!).

I present my support version here, remixed from the model of Johann. The model allows the installation of the support on surfaces with thickness up to 45 mm, and might be used on table top or shelves. The model is composed of three parts: the clamp itself, a bolt (which is threaded to the clamp) and a cap (fitted to the end of the bolt to compensate for surface angulation). A bolt and a knob are also used for the complete assembly.

Another new support presented here is the clip peg type. This support is designed to be "clipped" on flat surfaces with thickness up to 35 mm. The advantage here is, in addition to versatility, the fact that it is made up of a single piece! It will take longer to print, but it's make of a single part with no external moving parts.

The last part I present here is the zip tie mount. It was proposed by Gael Lanfond (link) based on a remix of the wall mount part. It has a couple of inserts, through which zip ties are passed. This assembly allows tying the luminaire in tubular structures, like pipes and post. It's a great idea!

Some users also proposed some models meant to be installed on 3D printers. like those ones by MAILLERE Brigitte (link) and Simon Couturier (link). Since different printers would have different setups, there are endless possibilities for supports like this!

Step 5: 3D Printing

You may print the parts described on the previous steps, in your favourite color. Some of the parts, like the arms or the knobs, might have to be printed more than once. I printed all the parts in PLA, with 0,2mm resolution, 20% infill and no supports (considering you place then with the right orientation, the one of the stl files).

You can find all files at:

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2505394

https://cults3d.com/en/3d-model/home/articulating-...

https://pinshape.com/items/40945-3d-printed-3d-pri...

https://www.myminifactory.com/object/3d-print-4369...

https://www.youmagine.com/designs/articulating-led...

Follows a picture of each part and the extimated tipe you'll take to print them.

Arms:

Printing time:

- "Female/female" arm (100 mm / 140 mm / 200 mm): 70 min / 90 min / 110 min

- "Male/Male" arm (100 mm / 140 mm / 200 mm): 120 min / 140 min / 160 min

- "Female/Male" arm (100 mm / 140 mm / 200 mm): 90 min / 110 min / 130 min

Knob

Printing time: 30 min

Single lamp holder:

Printing time: 105 min

Double lamp holder:

Printing time: 145 min

Lamp button:

Printing time: 95 min

Lamp cap:

Printing time: 25 min

Wire clip:

Printing time: 10 min

Wall mount:

Printing time: 70 min

Bolt:

Printing time: 70 min

Wall joint:

Printing time: 90 min

Clamp:

Printing time: 110 min

Clamp screw:

Printing time: 90 min

Clamp cap:

Printing time: 10 min

Clip:

Printing time: 235 min

Tube mount:

Printing time: 85 min

Don't have your own 3D printer? Did you know you can buy a Creality3D Ender for only $169.99? Get yours at https://rebrand.ly/3Dprinter-GB.

You can also find the lamp on sale on my Tindie store: https://www.tindie.com/products/igorf2/3d-printed-articulating-lamp/

Step 6: Assembling

In this step I'll show you how to assemble the lamp, connecting each part of it. The assembly is very intuitive and self explanatory, however I wanted to include some animations here! :D

As I said before, there are several ways to mount the lamp using more or less components. Here I present just how to assemble each component individually.


Arms

Connect the threaded end of one arm with the hollowed end of the next arm and use a knob to compress the two and lock their relative position.

Single lamp holder

Connect its end to the threaded end of one arm and use a knob to compress the two and lock their relative position.

Double lamp holder

Connect its end to the threaded end of one arm and use a knob to compress the two and lock their relative position.

Lamp connector

Pass a LED spotlight through the lamp holder and put the GU-10 connector on the other side.

Wire holder

Clip the wire holder into the arm, securing the cable.

Lamp cap

Pass the wires through the center hole of the part and attach the cap to the lamp connector.

Lamp button cap

Fit the button on the cap, solder the wires from the connector to the button terminals (not shown in the animation), and the power wires through the cap hole (not shown in the animation). Attach the connector to the lamp button cap part, and then the connector on the lamp.

Wall mount

Connect the wall joint to the hollowed end of one of the arms, imprisoning it with a knob. Enclose the wall mount in the wall joint, and pass a bolt through both parts. Thread a knob at the end of the bolt. Use a couple of screws to install it on the wall.

G-clamp

Connect the wall joint to the hollowed end of one of the arms, imprisoning it with a knob. Enclose the clamp in the wall joint, and pass a bolt through both parts. Thread a knob at the end of the bolt.

Clip

Connect the clip to the hollowed end of one of the arms, imprisoning it with a knob.

Tube mount

Connect the wall joint to the hollowed end of one of the arms, imprisoning it with a knob. Enclose the tube mount in the wall joint, and pass a bolt through both parts. Thread a knob at the end of the bolt. Use a couple of zip ties to install it on a pipe or post.




Step 7: Assembling - Suggested Recipes

As I showed before, once parts are printed, mounting the structures is easy! There are several ways to assemble the lamp by combining different parts to create the desired structure. Below I present some "recipes" for mounting your lamp:

Recipe #1 - Wall-mounted lamp

  • Wall mount (1)
  • Bolt (1)
  • Wall joint (1)
  • Arms (n)
  • Nuts (n+2)
  • Lamp holder (1)

How-to: Start from the wall mount part. The bolt passes through the wall mount and the wall joint parts and is locked with a knob on its end. Attach the female arm (or a mixed arm) to the wall joint using a knob. Connect the male arm (or another mixed arm) to the female on with another knob and attach the lamp holder to the other end of the male arm with another knob. Finally pass a LED spotlight through the lamp holder and put its connector. Your structure will be ready to be attached to the wall.

Recipe #2 - Desk/shelf mounted lamp (with clamp)

  • Clamp (1)
  • Clamp screw (1)
  • Clamp cap (1)
  • Bolt (1)
  • Wall joint (1)
  • Arms (n)
  • Nuts (n+2)
  • Lamp holder (1)

How-to: Start from the clamp part. Put the screw on one side of the camp and attach the cap on it's end. The bolt passes through the clamp and the wall joint parts and is locked with a knob on its end. Attach the female arm (or a mixed arm) to the wall joint using a knob. Connect the male arm (or another mixed arm) to the female on with another knob and attach the lamp holder to the other end of the male arm with another knob. Finally pass a LED spotlight through the lamp holder and put its connector. Your structure will be ready to be attached to the wall.

Recipe #3 - Desk/shelf mounted lamp (with clip)

  • Clip (1)
  • Arms (n)
  • Nuts (n+1)
  • Lamp holder (1)

How-to: Start from the clip part. Attach the female arm (or a mixed arm) to the clip part using a knob. Connect the male arm (or another mixed arm) to the female on with another knob and attach the lamp holder to the other end of the male arm with another knob. Finally pass a LED spotlight through the lamp holder and put its connector. Your structure will be ready to be attached to the wall.

Recipe #4 - Tube/post mounted lamp

  • Tube mount (1)
  • Bolt (1)
  • Wall joint (1)
  • Arms (n)
  • Nuts (n+2)
  • Lamp holder (1)

How-to: Start from the tube mount part. The bolt passes through the tube mount and the wall joint parts and is locked with a knob on its end. Attach the female arm (or a mixed arm) to the wall joint using a knob. Connect the male arm (or another mixed arm) to the female on with another knob and attach the lamp holder to the other end of the male arm with another knob. Finally pass a LED spotlight through the lamp holder and put its connector. Your structure will be ready to be attached to the wall.

*n is the number of arms you want on your articulating lamp. In any of the recipes, you might add some wire holders (one for each arm), a button cap or a simple protective cap.


Be careful when working with electricity. Make sure there is no short circuit and just try to connect to the electrical power plug after making sure that all components are properly connected and double insulated. If you don't have enough experience working with electricity, as for others help! Don't touch any exposed wire or any metal part of the LED lamp after it's energized! Some LED spots have a metal heat sink, and some GU10 connectors have exposed metal. Avoid touching that part when the lamp is on! If necessary, cover it with isolating materials!

Step 8: End Notes

It's done! Turn it on an let it shine!
You can adjust the angle between each component to make the spotlight aim the place you want to light up.

Have suggestions on how to improve the design? Need aditional parts to be designed? Leave it on the comments bellow!

If you still don't follow my tutorials, take a look at those other projects in which I explain a little bit about internet of things, robotics and 3D printing. I hope you enjoy them too!

Please consider supporting my future projects with a small donation! :D

The 3D printed articulating lamp is on sale at my Tindie store. Check it out:

https://www.tindie.com/products/igorf2/3d-printed-articulating-lamp/

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Participated in the
Remix Contest

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    4 Discussions

    1
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    dkimbril

    4 months ago on Step 8

    Note if you make the screws with an infill vs solid print the screws will break. Made this design but it broke after 3-4 adjustments to the light.
    Great design though! Love it.

    3 replies
    1
    None
    dorfman2dkimbril

    Reply 4 months ago

    Instead up upping infill, try upping the amount of "wall line count" (according to Cura. May also be called "wall thickness", "perimeters," etc.) Anytime I'm printing hardware that assembles such as screws and bolts, I always use at least 3-4 lines. The default for Cura is only 2 lines, and that is not usually enough for screws. I printed my lamp with 3 lines, but I might go back and print the clamp with 4 or 5 lines. Hope that helps!

    0
    None
    IgorF2dorfman2

    Reply 4 months ago

    Great idea! Extra wall lines would make it more resistant. Thanks for the suggestion. :)

    0
    None
    IgorF2dkimbril

    Reply 4 months ago

    Thanks! :)
    I’ve experience some breaks but figured out that if I print it with an infill greater than 20% it would be stronger. I also noticed that the nozzle temperature I was using was too low, so the layers were not with a good adhesion and the screw would break.
    After those corrections, I’ve no longer experience problems.
    Maybe it would help you.