Bring Dead Led to Light

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Intro: Bring Dead Led to Light

I got the ideea to put an dead led to high voltage and it worked.

Step 1: Power Source

The power source is from this instructable (https://www.instructables.com/id/Make-an-Ultra-Simple-High-Voltage-Generator/)

parts:
-transformer
-high current supply
-led
-crocodile clips

Step 2: High Voltage Supply

Invert the input with the output. Put the led at new output and power supply to new input

Step 3: Result

My output was at a low current as 20mA  but if the current is bigger the led can break fiscally the epoxy can break. You can put a diode bridge to convert from AC to DC.

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    42 Discussions

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    nmeek

    7 years ago on Introduction

    So disregarding the fact that at 300v the LED should instantly turn into a ball of flames, has anyone bought this enough to keep it on here? Shouldn't this be flagged for quality control? I mean it is dangerous and for all intents and purposes impossible.

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    russ_hensel

    7 years ago on Introduction

    Please stay away from voltages over 35 volts until you get a bit more experience under your belt. Random experiments with 300 volts could be your last. Just want you to hang around for a good while yet.

    16 replies
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    theVader75russ_hensel

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    I am totally safe because the amperage is not high.
    Before I started making projects with high voltage or any kind of projects I had the unpleasant experience to get electrocuted at 220v at 1amp and I survived so I know the risk

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    theVader75russ_hensel

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    it depends on voltage, at 220v about 500mA is enough to kill you above 1000v 300mA will kill you for sure

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    russ_henseltheVader75

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    I would check that out a bit more. The voltage depends mainly on ( highly variable ) skin resistance and can be much lower than 220 volts ). It is really only the current that kills and a lot depends upon how it is applied. On one hand a finger to finger shock can probably have enough current to turn the fingers to charcoal, a shock from arm to arm can have fairly low currents that will stop the heart ( and the right current can restart it ) If the current is 60 hz you may hz more (pun) See http://www.physics.ohio-state.edu/~p616/safety/fatal_current.html and think more about safety.

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    theVader75russ_hensel

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    I know the danger because I have been electrocuted many times . the worst in my opinion was when I touched the usb plug and a ground because then i didn't felt my teeth. and there were 5 volts and about 10amps. now i am starting to build a zvs driver for a flyback transformer to power up a tesla coil

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    dog diggertheVader75

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    yes but you said it was 10 amps. Normal USB outs on a computer are up to 500ma. The reason why you have been "electrocuted" many times is because you didn't know the dangers or you knew them but you weren't avoiding them. Besides, you might of just been shocked many times, not electrocuted. Sometimes if you are lucky, you can get electrocuted and survive, you will have burnt skin and you will be on the other side of the room.
    Stay safe!

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    theVader75dog digger

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    an atx power supply about 300w gives an output at 5v with 20 amps and my computer was very old so i assumed at the usb was about 10 amps ,sorry it was my mistake.
    yes I been shocked many times but also electrocuted.
    "you will be on the other side of the room" this is in the movies, I got electrocuted in the arm and all my muscles in that area got tense . you are able to think in that moment and you pull your tense arm with the other or call for help.

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    crazypjdog digger

    Reply 4 years ago on Introduction

    Way late to the party but, I have a friend who is a trained electrician (trained by FoMoCo)

    He regularly used the back of his hand to check 415V circuits. Said after 15+ yrs, it just tickled a bit

    As for the rest,

    I don't know much about electronics but
    and I wouldn't expect a ball of flame but probably crack or exploding
    epoxy due to thermal shock?

    What is the chemistry behind reviving a
    'dead' LED? I have a few that were over volted (not by me) and have
    turned brown, I don't think this would help them?

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    dog diggertheVader75

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    I just got shocked by a Hi-Fi amp. The caps were still charged and the wall plug was connected to them and It wasn't nice at all. My hand was hurting for hours!

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    dog diggertheVader75

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    This was low volts and high amps! Amps hurt... and kill...
    A flash cap would have hurt a heck of a lot

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    ASCAStheVader75

    Reply 6 years ago on Introduction

    Wait, how can a usb plug electricute you? Usually USB outlets only give up 5 volts DC and 1 ampere of power. Why did you get shocked?

    Actually, the hz allows you to let go because of the pulsing and polarity reversal. DC high voltage freezes your muscles, not enabling you to let go, and fries you in place. Yech! Disgusting, but true never the less.

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    Wackey Alex

    6 years ago on Introduction

    i killed a 5mm LED with just a 9v battery, whoops. s'pose that's why resistors are used