DIY 1-Hour Workbench / Outfeed Table

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About: Find me on YouTube and Instagram (@robertjkeller)!

This workbench is made from all 2x4 dimensional lumber and less than one full sheet of 3/4" plywood.

Here is the overall cut-list for the base:

8 x 28-1/8" (Legs)

4 x 37" (short braces)

4 x 67-3/4" (long braces)

I cut my top at 42" x 67-3/4". It has 2 extra inches of width in order to overhang a bracket on the back of my table saw.

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Step 1: Cut the Legs

I cut 8 pieces of 2x4 to 28-1/8". These will eventually become the legs, so I made sure they were all the exact same length. I used a stop-block on my miter saw to do this.

These legs are cut at a length that is equal to the height of my table saw, minus the height of the casters I used, minus the thickness of the top (3/4"). This made the workbench sit level with my table saw.

Step 2: Assemble the Legs

I used 2-1/2" construction screws to assemble the leg pieces at 90-degree angles. I like to use these particular screws because pre-drilling holes is not necessary-- they are excellent at not splitting the wood (honest opinion; I have no relationship with this company).

Make sure that the pieces are perfectly flush with each other so that your legs remain the same exact height.

Step 3: Cut the Side Braces (Short Sides)

I cut 4 pieces to a length of 37". These will become the braces on the short side of the workbench. Again, make sure they are all the same exact length-- this will help keep the workbench square.

Step 4: Attach the Side Braces (Short Sides)

I used 2 of the side support braces to attach 2 legs together, making sure the braces were flush with the tops of the legs. For the lower support braces, I used a scrap piece of wood as a spacer block to mark the same height on all 4 legs. Then I attached the lower support braces, using them to pull the legs straight and parallel before driving the screws in.

Step 5: Attach the Casters (optional)

If you are attaching casters, now is the time to do it! I used 1-1/4" screws and washers to attach mine under each leg. Make sure your casters have a locking mechanism and that it locks both the wheels and the swivel in each caster.

Step 6: Cut and Attach the Side Braces (Long Sides)

The last 2x4 pieces that need to be cut are 4 pieces at 67-3/4". These will be the upper and lower long-side support braces.

I attached them the same way I attached the short-side braces-- I made sure the upper braces were flush with the tops of the legs, then used a spacer block to ensure the lower braces were level.

The dimensions of the short and long side support braces were made for my particular workshop-- you can obviously alter these dimensions to fit your space.

Step 7: Attach the Lower Side Braces (Long Sides)

You'll probably want to use a clamp to help you out for this step, since the bottom of the legs won't be flush to the ground anymore with the casters installed.

Step 8: Cut the Top to Size

Cutting the top to 40" x 67-3/4" will make it flush with the base of the workbench-- I cut mine at 42" x 67-3/4" to add an extra 2" of width. This allows it to clear a bracket on the back of my table saw and sit flush against the cast iron top.

I used a track saw but there are many different ways to accomplish this cut. A simple circular saw with a straight-edge guide would be perfectly suitable.

Step 9: Attach the Top

I used 1-1/4" construction screws to attach the top to the base. You could attach it from underneath, but I plan on beating mine up and replacing it semi-regularly, so I wanted to make that process as easy as possible by attaching it through the top.

Step 10: Done!

That's all there is to it! This build can be accomplished in under an hour if you really go at it-- maybe 2 hours if you're in no rush.

Be sure to check out the video for more details of the process. I've got lots of other projects over on my channel, too: Robert J. Keller on YouTube

To see what I'm working on these days, head on over to my Instagram: @robertjkeller

Shoot me a message here, there, or anywhere if you have any questions.

Good luck!

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    5 Discussions

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    CPUDOCTHE1.

    22 days ago

    My son recently built a new reloading table. The old one was similar to what you built. The new one has 4x4 legs and stringers. For a top, he used a 74"x38" butcher block counter top. It has inlaid t-tracks to mount various components. He cut out 1/4" steel plates to attach the top to the legs and stringers. It is solid. If a tornado attacks, I am crawling under the table.

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    Philbert D

    22 days ago

    In previous plywood sheet top styles I've made, I add two inches to length and width in order to have a clamp 'lip' for holding down parts and temporary tools. Otherwise need a clamp with a throat that can extend past the 2x4 top brace and the piece to be calmped. This is an elegant use of commonly available wood and tools to make a sturdy combination workbench/outfeed table.

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    letaherklotz

    22 days ago

    In step 8 what brand of straight edge is that?

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    NdolaM

    23 days ago

    I like how at 5:54 in the video, magically blocks of wood above the casters appear ;-)

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    NathaelP

    23 days ago on Step 10

    Hi ! you can improve by making it adjustable using a screw + nut in each leg, as I draw on the attached image

    Adjustable_table_feet.jpg