DIY Gyroscope

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Introduction: DIY Gyroscope

About: Hi. I'm Tranie =)

Are you interested in flying things but are too lazy to create something complicated? Then the DIY gyroscope is the perfect toy for you! Not only is it very simple to make, it is also proven to fly very well, as shown in the video below. So give it a try, it's a perfect alternative to the well-known paper airplane.

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Step 1: Materials and Tools

Things you'll need to make the gyroscope:

1. A 1 liter bottle

2. Tape

3. An X-acto knife / Scissors

Step 2: Cut Out the Gyroscope

First, start off by cutting out the section of the bottle that is evenly round. Depending on which type of bottle you're using, it would usually be either the bottom part or the upper part. This will later become the main body part of the gyroscope.

Remember to cut off both ends of the bottle, both top and bottom, so that it has the shape of an empty cylinder.

Step 3: Fold the Gyroscope

After cutting out the cylinder, you will need to fold a small part in, about 1/6 of the cylinder.

Make sure that the fold is carefully flattened out by pressing down the x-acto knife/scissors onto it.

Step 4: Tape the Fold

Even though the fold is flattened out, it still needs to be secured. To do that, cut off a piece of tape that is slightly longer than the perimeter of the cylinder, then simply tape it around the end with the fold of the gyroscope.

After that, all you need to do is fold in the tape.

Step 5: Fold the Tape

And voilà, you now have your very own flying DIY Gyroscope. Though it might not have the best visuals, decorations could always be added with paint and stickers.

Have fun!

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    14 Discussions

    0
    awdhunkd
    awdhunkd

    2 years ago

    And also, I've made this twice and it was really easy to make. I don't really see efforts inside the post in here, because when I made it by myself it only took 5 minutes and u guys described as if you guys did something like 2 weeks or so.

    0
    Belitahaagsma
    Belitahaagsma

    Reply 2 years ago

    You might take 5 minutes to make this, but please respect and appreciate others for their effort

    0
    alyahshebani
    alyahshebani

    Reply 2 years ago

    The way they describe it is quite easy and efficient. Yes, they were specific but that is for the people who need it. Some people prefer specific instructions and others prefer simple and quick. For your information, it looks like it took them like 4 minutes, not 2 weeks. Also your comment isn't nice nor constructive ;)

    0
    DreamDabbler
    DreamDabbler

    2 years ago

    Ah yes, an Annular Wing! I don't think any real airplanes have flown with this design, but there was a French experimental plane that almost worked: http://gizmodo.com/5916683/the-experimental-french-aircraft-that-wasnt -- maybe they should have designed it so that the wing would spin like this one!

    0
    bcihlar
    bcihlar

    Reply 2 years ago

    I do belive that they now do have a few planes and gliders flying with this wing type. I just recently read some articles in popular mechanics & tv show about this "sail" . I was shocked to learn that even boats use cylinders as sails and that the effect cause by wind rotating the cylinders also store energy in the plane and ships generators requiring no fuel...very cool

    0
    DreamDabbler
    DreamDabbler

    Reply 2 years ago

    There are some closed wing types, but if you find any with circular wings (not ducted fans), please share the link. The wind-powered ships have quite different cylinders, and they are vertically oriented to catch the wind.

    0
    larry03052
    larry03052

    2 years ago

    This is actually a Cylinder Glider, or a Riing Glider, not a gyroscope, though it likely does spin. Spinning is what causes the gyroscopic effect and is usually done with caged flywheel with considerable mass. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyroscope http://www.10paperairplanes.com/how-to-make-paper-airplanes/07-the-ring.html

    0
    alyahshebani
    alyahshebani

    Reply 2 years ago

    Nice to know.

    0
    Swansong
    Swansong

    2 years ago

    That's a fun toy :)

    0
    alyahshebani
    alyahshebani

    Reply 2 years ago

    I know right!

    0
    Anshu AR
    Anshu AR

    2 years ago

    Looks like fun!

    :)

    0
    Tranie
    Tranie

    Reply 2 years ago

    Thank you so much! =]

    0
    Anshu AR
    Anshu AR

    2 years ago

    Also, What is that music in the video?

    I mean it's nice.