DIY Turmeric Powder

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Tumeric is a multi-purpose herbal medicine, good internally and externally. Fresh tumeric powder is great for teas, curries or to add an interesting taste and colour to your food. Externally, add tumeric powder to petroleum jelly to assist with skin disorders and improve overall skin tone.

Step 1: Wash Saffron Rhizomes

Rinse and remove all dirt and debris that may be trapped around each rhizome. Scrub with a vegetable brush if you can.

Step 2: Boil Saffron

In cold clear water, boil the saffron until soft.

Step 3: Cut Into Small Pieces

Cut cooled saffron into small pieces and spread on a baking sheet or in your dehydrator.

Step 4: Bake for 1-3hrs

This step would depend on the setting of your oven or dehydrator. The desired texture is dry and crisp, almost brittle to the touch.

Step 5: Add to Blender

Place the dried saffron into a blender to process into powder.

Step 6: Blend Well for Tumeric

The consistency of the finished tumeric powder will depend on you, but I like mine as fine as possible. This finished tumeric powder will keep well over a year. Store in an airtight container and use daily for great health benefits.

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19 Discussions

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CattleyaT

Question 9 months ago on Step 4

Can I use the procedure for my research and also if baking is not available, is there any other ways aside from using oven?

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nanaverm

2 years ago

It's spelled turmeric. Why couldn't one just slice the rhizomes thinly and dry it raw? Also, it would be helpful to know the temperature at which you baked it to dehydrate it. Your finished turmeric is much more brown than the glowing saffron color it is when sold commercially.

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HouseC1nanaverm

Reply 10 months ago

Boiling or heating makes the curcumin in raw form into deketene curcumin, a stronger substance that fights cancers.

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QuilinFnanaverm

Reply 2 years ago

A sistren of mine suggested I freeze it and then grate it, but this technique is an ancient one used by Indian people here in the Caribbean. I'm not sure why mine is a little browner, will try the method of not boiling and freezing the rhizomes instead.

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nanavermQuilinF

Reply 2 years ago

Works great (grate, ha ha) with ginger root, too.

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QuilinFnanaverm

Reply 2 years ago

Just found this great article that explains why it's boiled, explained as 'curing': http://www.turmericforhealth.com/general-info/how-to-make-turmeric-powder-at-home-from-raw-turmeric

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GrampsTT

2 years ago

I have some and was in need of this info @QuilinF Thanks!!!

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PeterS196hcjkelle

Reply 2 years ago

Turmeric rhizomes are easy to grow. Home Depot in US sells decorative plants.

Saffron rhizomes are a little more difficult. See picture and description above.

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QuilinFhcjkelle

Reply 2 years ago

Hi there, i'm not sure where you are. Here in the Caribbean it's quite common. Maybe you can try an Ethnic store or an Indian grocery for sure should have some. Good luck!

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QuilinFPeterS196

Reply 2 years ago

Hi Peter, is it that you don't like saffron? It is very strong medicine but one that's just too good not to have in your herbal medicine kit. The petroleum jelly can be replaced with a more organic carrier oil, like virgin coconut oil.

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PeterS196QuilinF

Reply 2 years ago

Hi QuilinF
Not trying to be rude but saffron is not Turmeric, not even distantly related. Google.
Petroleum jelly is overused in many cheap skin creams and BABY lotions. Just like GMO's it is not to be recommended for use on humans.
Virgin coconut oil is good.

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QuilinFPeterS196

Reply 2 years ago

Hi Peter, you're not being rude but being open to the cultural references to a particular place and culture should be considered before commenting. There is the saffron flower, and there's also the root that most Indian people call 'saffron' as well. While it may be attributed to the colour it produces, that is the common name here. Petroleum jelly has been used for ages on children as a lubricant, while more organic sources are being recommend and sourced now, it is still common for a lot of people as a cheap and easily available carrier gel/oil.

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PeterS196QuilinF

Reply 2 years ago

Where ignorance is bliss......

To which Indian tribe are you referring?

Saffron is a spice derived from the flower of Crocus sativus, commonly known as the "saffron crocus". Saffron crocus grows to 20–30 cm and bears up to four flowers, each with three vivid crimson stigmas, which are the distal end of a carpel. The styles and stigmas, called threads, are collected and dried to be used mainly as a seasoning and colouring agent in food. Saffron, long among the world's most costly spices by weight, is native to Greece or Southwest Asia and was first cultivated in Greece. As a genetically monomorphic clone, it was slowly propagated throughout much of Eurasia and was later brought to parts of North Africa, North America, and Oceania.

Saffron is a spice derived from the flower of Crocus sativus, commonly known as the "saffron crocus". Saffron crocus grows to 20–30 cm and bears up to four flowers, each with three vivid crimson stigmas, which are the distal end of a carpel. The styles and stigmas, called threads, are collected and dried to be used mainly as a seasoning and colo…

saffron.jpg
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QuilinFmomoluv

Reply 2 years ago

You're welcome! Thanks for commenting :)

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wold630

2 years ago

This is awesome! I had no idea how to make my own!

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QuilinFwold630

Reply 2 years ago

So glad I could share it with you! Please, try it at home. Would love to hear how you plan to use your own fresh tumeric powder.