Dried Fish Curry With Preserved Seer Fish

Intro: Dried Fish Curry With Preserved Seer Fish

Spotted Seer Fish, popularly known as Indo-Pacific King Mackerel is one of the most delicious fish varieties found around the Indian ocean. It is also available in dried form, preserved in salt and can be bought from the local market.

In this instructable, we will see how to make dried fish curry with about 100 grams of preserved pieces of seer fish.

Step 1: Prepare the Dried Fish Pieces

  • The dried fish pieces are preserved in salt. Soak the pieces in water for about 15 minutes and drain out the water. This will remove excess salt from the pieces.
  • Add about a teaspoon of Red chili powder and a teaspoon of Turmeric powder and mix well with the pieces.
  • Keep this aside for about 15 minutes.

Step 2: Onion and Garlic

  • Lots of onions will make the fish curry more tasty. Take about 100 grams of shallots or big onions and a handful Garlic cloves
  • Remove dry skin from onion and shuck garlic
  • Make a rough paste of these together in a mixer grinder. Do not make a fine paste.

Step 3: Saute Dried Fish Pieces

  • Heat about two tablespoons of cooking oil to a frying pan and add a handful of curry leaves
  • Add the marinated dried fish pieces and saute for about five minutes over medium heat

Step 4: Add Onion and Garlic Mix

  • Add the roughly crushed onion and garlic mix to the pan
  • Cook over medium heat till raw smell of onion and garlic disappears from the mix
  • If required add little amount of water

Step 5: Add Coconut Milk

  • In the mean time, crush half a coconut and extract the milk
  • Add the coconut milk to the dried fish curry in the pan
  • Cook till the desired consistency is achieved. you can keep it thick or thin as you like

Transfer the cooked dried fish curry to a serving dish. You can serve it with rice, bread, chappati and other main dishes

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    tercero

    1 year ago

    OK. I'll be honest. At first glance, I let my Canadian palate take over, and thought "hey, no way I'd try this".

    But.

    One thing I've learned as I've reached my 50th year. Never turn up your nose at something that might just be delicious. I love Indian food (and Korean, Vietnamese, Chinese (not Canadian or American versions, real authentic Chinese), Japanese..etc) because it's based on bold flavour that are meant to give a boost to boring foods. One thing about living in Canada for those of you not familiar with us. With become a real multi ethnic culture and have people from all over the world here cooking and enriching our lives in places like Toronto and Montreal.

    Wrapping this up. Thanks for this 'ible. It's something I'm going to try. I'm sure it's delicious.