Easily Double the Power Output of a L293D Motor Driver Board

An Easy Way to Double The Current Capacity of the KEYES L293D Motor Control Shield Motor Drive Expansion Board for Arduino (This method should work for any L293D chips)
This is a quick and easy method to double the current available on this board!

What you will need: 2 x L293D chips.

Soldering Iron and solder.

So the whole idea is to solder another L293D chip directly on top of the current one. Pin for pin of course This puts the two chips in parallel so the voltage will remain the same but the amperage doubles. These chips are rated at about 600ma continuous or up to 1.2A for a short period. Now they will handle 1.2A continuous and 2.4A for short periods.

Not sure how many of these you can stack before it becomes redundant. If you are experimenting with this and find out please let me know. Many thanks!

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    2 Discussions

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    NickH123

    6 months ago

    It looks like you've tried this, so I assume it works to some extent (and I will likely give it a shot myself), but I think you're oversimplifying the gains. While you've doubled the power throughput, you've done nothing to dissipate the heat generated by the extra chip!

    I think you're right that it could probably handle a 2.4 amp peak stall for a short time, but that time will be shortened as there will be more heat with less surface per watt to dissipate it. I am less optimistic about continuous amperage gains. If I understand correctly, continuous amperage is based on heat dissipation, and there is not much improvement in thermal conduction here.

    I am still probably going to try this, as I have an application where I'm more concerned with short bursts of power, and not continuous operation.