Electric Skateboard Odometer

Introduction

Most high-end electric skateboard around a thousand dollar range comes with a phone app that displays skateboard real-time information and unfortunately, the more cost-effective skateboards from China doesn't come with those. So why not make one yourself?

Background Information

Most of the electric skateboard hub-motors come with built-in sensors that the skateboard uses to get speed information. So we are going to tap into the sensors in the motors to use it for our own advantage.

Disclaimer

This is my Sophomore Design Project and there are still a few tweaks left for me to fix. I will keep updating the instructable over the winter break. This project will void your warranty and I am not responsible for any damages that happen while doing the project.

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Step 1: Parts

Electric Skateboard

Arduino Nano

Monochrome 1.3" 128x64 OLED Display

Protoboard

Miscellaneous Tools

  • Skate Tool
  • Hex Key
  • Dremel
  • Drill
  • Screwdriver
  • Hot Glue
  • Wires
  • Soldering Iron

Software

Step 2: Making Space

After opening the ESC and Battery Enclosure, there is hardly any space for extra components. So depending on your skateboard, get a Dremel and some tools to make some space for the display, Arduino and extra wires.

In my case with my Meepo Board, I cut the heatsink and the casing to lower the heatsink and ESC for like 5mm.

Then I removed the griptape to run addional wires between the battery and ESC casing. I ran 8 wires just in case I might need one in the future.

The Arduino sits in the Battery Compartment and the OLED takes the place of the old battery meter.

Step 3: Wiring

Motor Sensor Wire to Arduino

  • Black Wire to GND
  • Red Wire to 3V3
  • Orange Wire to D5

OLED to Arduino

  • VCC to 5v
  • GND to GND
  • SCL to A4
  • SCA to A5

Step 4: Code

Again, to measure the speed, I use the frequency measure library to find the frequency of the pulses from the motor sensor. And for the distance, I multiplied the speed with the time for each cycle of the loop code that the processor is calculating.

Install the library for Arduino and upload the code to the Arduino.

The speed is calculated for 90mm Meepo Hub Motors. Change the constant w to change the diameter.

Step 5: Future Upgrades

I'll try to integrate Bluetooth for the Arduino to work with a smartphone. And future upgrades will include a more stable and accurate sensor reading.

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