Electronic Component Earrings

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About: Lover of hackers, knitters, cupcake bakers, shennanigans, sci-fi/fantasy, board games, coding and men in drag. Find me blogging at Dorkbyte.com Catch me on Twitter too! @zazenergy

Intro: Electronic Component Earrings

I found myself with dozens of capacitors and resistors of different shapes and colors and decided to turn them into jewelry. Produce your own completely unique pieces of jewelry and show them off!

Step 1: Collect Your Materials

For this Instructable you'll need:
  • Resistors, capacitors or other electronic components 
  • Silver plated earring hooks
  • Solder
  • Soldering iron
  • Soldering helping hand
  • Clippers
Where to buy components and electronics supplies:
  • I recommend Mouser to buy online or HSC Halted if you live in the San Francisco Bay Area and can drive to their warehouse


Step 2: Solder Together Your Jewelry

  1. Secure the earring hooks in the soldering helping hands.
  2. On your component, using a cutter to move one end of the wire. (Alternatively, you can wrap the two wires around one another if they're not on opposite ends of a component. Depending on the components you have, you'll need to get creative at this step).
  3. On your component, with the remaining wire, wrap it through the earring hook
  4. Solder the wire loop to itself (and not to the earring hook). This will allow for it to dangle and not lie stiff.
  5. Put them on and enjoy!

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    22 Discussions

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    lferrelld

    5 months ago

    I will be making this soon, Thanks for the idea.

    this is such a great idea! I might make something along the lines of this. Thanks for the share!

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    Wow, great job on these!

    I'm tempted to get my old motherboard out of the closet and make some jewelry. It finally has something useful to do!

    (By the way, on the sample image for step 2 I thought you had on your moustache from your "Moustache Ride" Instructable. Until I clicked on step 2 of course.)

    1 reply
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    Thanks! You definitely should get out a motherboard and take it apart to make these!

    I get so many compliments on this jewelry. It's also a very unique gift for that special person in your life!

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    vishalapr

    7 years ago on Introduction

    What a creative and amazing use for waste electronic equipment!!!

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    hanniballecter90

    7 years ago on Step 2

    Designs are extraordinarily beautiful, but raw material of semiconductor electronic elements that you have to wonder if the damage to health

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    zazenergyFrogzard101

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    I prefer leaded solder because it's rosin core is non-toxic to breathe in. Apparently, the flux inside lead-free solder is toxic.

    Just wash your hands immediately after touching lead and you should be A-OK.

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    mr.frobzazenergy

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    I also prefer leaded solder because I think it just works better than lead-free. From my experience it takes more heat to get going and even then doesn't quite act right. Sweet instructable btw.

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    xAxrulesmr.frob

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    lead free doesn't bond the same and does take more heat. Also the fumes are worse for you. Leaded solder is easier to use, contains barely any lead anyway, bonds better and you can tell the difference between a dry joint and a good joint! All lead-free joints look like dry joints!

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    mdog93

    7 years ago on Introduction

    I didn't think they were meant to sell leaded solder anymore... i'm sure i read that, not true?

    3 replies
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    zazenergymdog93

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    It's still sold in the US, but I believe it may be banned/restricted in Europe.

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    mdog93zazenergy

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    yes, although to day i checked the sort of solder they use at my school and it is 60/40 tin/lead alloy or is it lead/tin i can't remember

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    xAxrulesmdog93

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    It is restricted, but you are able to buy leaded solder in the uk if you are a hobbyist, mass produced electronics have to use unleaded solder (unfortunately...)

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    Bruno153

    7 years ago on Introduction

    Srry... but the soldering iron contains lead.... i don't think it's right using something so dangerous in earrings... i think that we can change it for something similar...

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    PS118

    7 years ago on Introduction

    Next step: Combine with LED Throwie technology.

    Ideally one red LED and one green, thus your 'lobes serve as port/starboard markers after dark! XD

    1 reply