Extension Cord Storage Loops


65

Retired Tool Maker ( 1980 ) Retired Mechanical Engineer ( 2009 ) Full time Tinkerer

Hi Gang:

Here is a way to store extension cords and also ropes quickly on smaller hooks. I used to use long pegboard hooks to hang my cords on. It didn't take much of a cord to start overloading the pegboard hooks.

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Step 1: Lucky Find!

So I was checking out a fabric store that had closed. They had thrown out the Zipper display cabinet. It had a dozen of these really neat wire hook sets. I hesitate to mention them, since I've only been so luck once. But the next step will work with any hooks.

Step 2: Hanging Loops

So take about 2 foot of any rope and tie it into a loop. I like a bowling knot, but a square knot would work too.

While you are on a roll make up several. Store these on an empty hook.

Step 3: Looping a Cord

Lay your wound up cord over the rope loop.

Step 4: Close the Loop

Put one end of the loop through the other end of the loop. Now you have the cord contained with a loop that can hang most anywhere. You can even carry the cord with the loop on to your work site.

Step 5: All Done, Time to Clean Up.

So mount some hooks on the wall, tie some loops and get all your cords organized!


Step 6: Getting to Your Cords.

So when you need a cord, just lift the cord you want and lift the loop off the hook. Your cord will be free to drop into your hands.

Good luck with this.
As Always, Please Be Careful!

Carl.

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    6 Discussions

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    dchall8

    Tip 4 days ago

    For years I coiled my cables like you do. One big disadvantage of coils is you have to uncoil them to use them. They tangle otherwise. Then I tried the slip knot loop with loop within loop. More recently I simply bring the two ends of the cable together, grab the middle and bring it to the ends, grab the new middle and bring that to the ends, etc. until it seems easy to handle. Then I take one of the ends and wrap that around the wad and poke it through one of the loops. By doing it like this I can unwrap the end, hold on to both ends, and toss the cable out with no tangles. It's magic. I first started doing it this way on a sail boat with a lot of lines to keep track of. It really works.

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    carl5blumdchall8

    Reply 3 days ago

    I double up cords and ropes until I can tie the bundle in an overhand knot. It is a quick way to store power cords in a bucket. Sometimes to get a good length for the overhand knot I fold it in thirds.

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    tmspro

    9 days ago

    Nice find on the storage hooks! I like to do an extra wrap of the hanging loop around the electrical cord before hanging, in the hopes of relieving a bit of stress on the knot in the loop.

    1 reply
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    carl5blumtmspro

    Reply 9 days ago

    Hello: I've never had one of these loops fail. Most are half the size of the blue cord.
    But a second loop may take some stress off the extension cord. Thanks, Carl.

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    oragamiunicorn

    9 days ago

    I do something similar, just a tip, I find when winding the cord if you leave the ends slightly longer than the loop you are less likely to have knots when they come back into use.

    1 reply