Glass Potato Chips

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About: Loving mom of two beautiful boys, obsessive compulsive confetti user & passionate foodie!

Intro: Glass Potato Chips

Let's be honest: Potato chips are boring. Every time I wander the chip aisle of the grocery store, there is some supposedly new twist on the potato chip. Classic. Jalapeno. Terra Blue. Vinegar and salt. Vidalia onion. Ranch. Whatever. Most are a disappointment.

Why couldn't the potato chip be beautiful? A work of art? An architectural design element?

Behold: The Edible Glass Potato Chip

This chip is stunning. It's see-through like no other food. It has the distinct crunch and flavor of a potato chip, but in an unexpected space-age form.

This is molecular gastronomy brought home. It involves potato stock, potato starch, and a slow-dried gel. The first couple of steps are a breeze, but I warn you in advance: you must have patience to bring these to fruition. The last few steps require that you dehydrate the gel and then deep fry the chips in oil (like the real ones). But the result is oh-so-worth-it (every calorie, too).

The original recipe was created Hamid Salimian, the chef at Diva at the Met. I improved the recipe by using a squeeze bottle to create more uniform potato chips. I also experimented with adding herbs like rosemary to the recipe which is a great way to bring your own twist to the recipe.

Enjoy!

Step 1: Ingredients

Ingredients:   

Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees F

8 Yukon Gold Potatoes

High quality finishing salt or Kosher Salt

1/2 Cup

Olive Oil

4 Cups Water

4 Tbsp Potato Starch 

Optional- Fresh herbs/ Rosemary

Squeeze Bottle





Step 2: Wash the Potatoes

Wash the potatoes in cold water and dry them with a paper towel. 

Step 3: Season & Bake

Place the cleaned potatoes on a cutting board and make a slit into each one about 1cm thick. Next, place the potatoes in a bowl and add the olive oil & salt. Toss to combine. 

Place the potatoes on a baking sheet and into the pre-heated oven for 25 minutes. 

Pour four cups of water into a pot and bring it to the temperature right under a boil. 

Step 4: Make the Baked Potato Stock

Place the baked potatoes into a clean bowl and pour the hot liquid over it. Cover the top of the bowl and let it sit at room temperature for two hours. 

Remove the potatoes and save for another dish. Strain the liquid using a fine mesh strainer. Place the stock into an airtight container and chill, preferably overnight. 


Step 5: Make the Potato Gel

To make the Potato Gel, pour the chilled stock into a pot over medium high heat and add 4 tbsp of the potato starch. Whisk the mixture immediately. The starch will stick to the bottom a bit. Continue whisking the starch and stock until the mixture turns into a gel. 

Step 6: Form Shapes and Dry in Oven

Pre-heat oven to 135 degrees F. Place a piece of parchment paper on a baking sheet. Pour the gel into a squeeze bottle. Form oval elongated shapes resembling potato chips onto the parchment. They should be semi thick. If they are too thin, they will break when you fry them. 

Place in the oven for 8-10 hours or overnight. You need the gel to be completely dry for this to work.

If you are in a rush, you can raise the oven heat to 225  degrees F and it may shorten the drying time. Just be sure they don't get to dried out, they may shrivel up. Drying time may be cut in half at this temperature, but not sure. 

Step 7: Make the Glass Potato Chips

To make the Glass Potato Chips, pour vegetable oil into a wok or deep saute pan. I wouldn't recommend using a fryer unless it has a really low temperature setting because the chips will most likely burn. I did a couple of test runs and when the oil was to hot they lost their "glass" texture and they resembled a fried pork rind. 

Make sure the heat is on low/medium low. I recommend starting with the heat on medium low and then lowering the heat to low.  Use a pair of tongs and dip one or two chips at a time into the oil. The chips are really delicate, but will stand up to being handled with the tongs. Just be gentle. Turn them a couple of times. You will notice immediately the glass texture once they hit the oil. Be attentive and watch the chips. Once they turn a light golden amber they are ready. 

Place them on a paper towel and sprinkle with salt. 

Step 8: Edible Glass Potato Chips!

Here ya' go! Completely edible glass potato chips! Although time consuming, these are really freakin cool and they taste amazing!

Please post pics if decide to make these. 

Enjoy!

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    128 Discussions

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    AndyF93

    8 months ago

    Can you use this technique with other vegetables? I would assume root vegetables would work?
    Btw very inspiring!

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    mrsmerwin

    1 year ago

    I have a few taro roots. They are starchier than potatoes. Do you think I could substitute?

    1 reply
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    paperbridgeee

    1 year ago

    Hi I'm thinking of making this for a class project. May I ask if you know how long (in days) can this be stored for before it goes bad/soft?

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    DanaM123

    1 year ago

    omg! Impressive im really impressed

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    lmnopeasmaxinewicks

    Reply 4 years ago on Introduction

    Anywhere between 10-15, depending on how big or little you squeeze the gel onto the parchment.

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    Transparent enough, with a slightly yellowish tint, but they were definitly something new and surprising.

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    DqwertyC

    5 years ago on Introduction

    These look amazing! I'll probably make these for April Fools Day. Any idea if you could get a 'stained glass' look if you added food dye while mixing in the starch?

    1 reply
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    lmnopeasDqwertyC

    Reply 5 years ago on Introduction

    Yes! You can achieve this effect by adding a few drops of food coloring or food gel. Have fun!

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    lmnopeas

    5 years ago on Introduction

    Your biggest expense would be the potato starch. It shouldn't cost you more than $10-15 dollars if you have some of the other ingredients on hand.

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    mandriloquai

    5 years ago on Introduction

    I have never seen this twist on potato chips... very "molecular cuisine". Thanks for the idea and hope I can try it soon