Heay Duty Yard Spot Lights

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My family uses colored spot lights for decorating the house at Christmas.

These are the ones that my grandfather made several years ago. We have them now and they should last for many years to come.

They are metal wall outlets with a spotlight attachment. The stake is a piece of pipe/ conduit flattened at one end and cut to a point. They are held on with conduit fittings to the box. The wire is a 25Ft waterproof extension cord connected to the box with a wire clamp. All places that water could come in are sealed from the inside with silicone caulk. The outlets are covered with a outside outlet weather cover and then a piece of rubber to keep snow, ice and water from getting on the plugs.

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    9 Discussions

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    dooj

    10 years ago on Introduction

    as simple as this is, you should make an instructable on it.

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    Phil B

    10 years ago on Introduction

    The connector that physically holds the orange extension cord in the back of the box is not raintight, even though the box and its cover are raintight. It might be good to make the rubber flap longer so it extends over the back of the box, too. Also, it would be good if the outlet were ground fault interrupter proctected (GFCI). That was probably not the standard when your grandfather made this, but it is a good idea, anyway. A GFCI shuts off power to the circuit whenever any imbalance between current going out and current returning is detected, as when there is a short to ground (especially one caused by current passing through your body).

    7 replies
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    Rob KPhil B

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    I would prefer that they are on GFI also,but the are connected to the house by a GFI outlet.

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    Mr. Smart KidRob K

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    i hate gfis. if i want touse a worm zapper i have to run a cord into the liveing room and for a fridge or incubator u have to install a new outlet room in my house that have them bed room, kitchen , grarge, bath room out side,... fridges and freezers some times trip gfis, and if u have valuable eggs in a incubator id rather get a real bad shock than loose my hatch

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    Phil BMr. Smart Kid

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    I think you are writing in English, but I cannot understand more than a few words of what you wrote. Could you write it again in standard English?

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    GamernotnerdPhil B

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    I hate GFCIs. If I want to use a Worm Zapper I have to run a cord into the living room. GFCIs are sometimes triggered by Refrigerators and Freezers; the only way that I know of to circumvent this is to install a new outlet. The rooms in my house that have GFCIs are, as listed: Bedroom, Kitchen, Garage, Bathroom, and Outdoors; And, as previously mentioned, Refrigerators and Freezers sometimes trip GFCIs, therefore, if you, hypothetically, had eggs to hatch in an Incubator it would seem better to get a rather nasty shock, and possibly electrocuted, than loose a hatch of eggs. There, I translated it for you.

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    Mr. Smart KidPhil B

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    i hate gfis. if i want to use a worm zapper, i would have to run a cord into the living room. to prevent a fridge from tripping a gfi u have to install a new outlet. rooms in my house that have gfis are, bed room, kitchen , grarge, bath room out side,... fridges and freezers some times trip gfis, and if u have valuable eggs to hatch in a incubator id rather get a real bad shock than loose my hatch of eggs