Home Automation With Arduino

About: Student in Architecture at the University of Brussels | Student in Digital Fabrication Studio (FabLab Brussels)// Medias • High-Tech • 

This finished product combines the alarm part, weather, wireless clock, assembly and cutting of parts produced by laser cutting.
I chose 3 objects of relatively small size to facilitate a discreet implantation in the place of life. My choice fell on a wireless weather sensor, a wireless motion detector and a central retrieving information from various sensors. It is also possible to produce additional modules, following the same spirit and method of manufacture. I started by harvesting and listing the various components needed for manufacturing. Then I established the respective codes for each module. To finally assemble everything in a box that will serve as object and final product.

My project is divided into three parts:

- Central hub with a screen and keyboard acting as interface. This one is divided into 4 menus, Date & Time, Weather, Arm the system and change the password.

- Weather sensor: temperature and humidity sensor with a wireless module and 2 LEDs.

- Alarm sensor: Motion detector, transmitter and 2 LEDs.

Each part is driven by an Arduino board, powered by a 9V battery.

Step 1: Master HUB

Equipment

- Arduino MEGA

- LCD screen 20x4

- 4x4 keyboard

- NRF24L01

- DS3231

- Receiver 433MHZ

- Buzzer

- LED x3 (Green, Yellow, Red)

- Resistance 220 ohm x3

- ABS plastic case

- Breadboard

- Dupont Cables

- Battery 9V + switch

To power my boxes, I use a 9V battery with a jack adapter to connect to the female plug of the Arduino. However I soldered a switch in order to turn off and on the box according to our wishes and to save money. drums.

To do this, I stripped the red wire, the +, to weld the switch to create a contact to let the current. Finally, to protect my welds, I used heat-shrink tubing which, as a result of the heat, retracts and attaches to the weld to protect it from false contact and reinforce it.

Assembly

Before proceeding to the manufacture of the object, I assemble the different elements according to the diagram realized with the OpenSource software Fritzing.

Once all the elements are assembled, I check that everything is working properly. The green LED means there is power.

The advantage of a 20x4 LCD screen is that it can display a lot more characters compared to 16x2. In my case, I can easily display the 4 program menus.

Regarding cutting, I came across a problem. Indeed, I had planned to cut the facade to laser cutting, however, being plastic there was a risk of melting the upper part of the case. I preferred to cut everything myself by hand with the help of cutters, saws, drill and sandpaper.

Production time: 2 hours

To begin, we must assemble the different connectors of the facade. The drilling is accurate, it takes almost no glue, it fits easily.

Finally I assemble the rest of the components following the pattern made on Fritzing before placing everything in the box. I have also added heat-shrink tubing for more security and strength on the welds of the led. I then close the assembly with the help of 4 screws located on each corner and I check that everything is working properly.

Step 2: Weather Station

Equipment

- Arduino UNO

- NRF24L01

- DHT 11

- LED x2 (Green, Blue)

- Resistance 220 ohm x2

- ABS plastic case

- Breadboard

- Dupont Cables

- Battery 9V + switch

Assembly

Before proceeding to the manufacture of the object, I assemble the different elements according to the diagram realized with the OpenSource software Fritzing.

Once all the elements are assembled, I check that everything is working properly. The green LED means there is power. The blue LED when it lights up every 5 seconds. These 5 seconds correspond to the time interval between each temperature capture of the DHT sensor 11.

Once assembled, I test the main module and the weather sensor. By pressing the B key on the keyboard, I receive the temperature and humidity data sent wirelessly by the sensor NRF24L01.

Manufacturing

I started by creating the facade of my case on

Autocad. I inserted a hole for the switch and the 2 LEDs.

Regarding cutting, I came across a problem. Indeed, I had planned to cut the facade to laser cutting, however, being plastic there was a risk of melting the upper part of the case. I preferred to cut everything myself by hand with the help of cutters, saws, drill and sandpaper.

Production time: 0h30

To begin, we must assemble the different connectors of the facade. The drilling is accurate, it takes almost no glue, it fits easily.

Finally I assemble the rest of the components following the pattern made on Fritzing before placing everything in the box. I also added heat-shrink tubing for extra security and solidity on the welds of the led.

I do not forget to drill a hole on each side of the

box in order to let in the air and obtain the data of the DHT sensor 11.

I then close the assembly with the help of 4 screws located on each corner and I check that everything is working properly.

Step 3: Alarm Sensor

Equipment

- Arduino UNO

- Transmitter 433 MHz

- PIR sensor

- LED x2 (Green, Red)

- Resistance 220 ohm x2

- ABS plastic case

- Breadboard

- Dupont Cables

- Battery 9V + switch

Assembly

Before proceeding to the manufacture of the object, I assemble the different elements according to the diagram realized with the OpenSource software Fritzing.

Once all the elements are assembled, I check that everything is working properly. The green LED means there is power. The red LED lights up as soon as the PIR sensor detects motion. As soon as a movement is sensed, it is then necessary to wait 5 seconds for the sensor to reset.

Once assembled, I test the main module and the alarm sensor. By pressing the C key on the keyboard, I arm the system which automatically starts a countdown of 9 seconds. The D key allows me to change the password.

Manufacturing

I started by creating the facade of my case on

Autocad. I inserted a hole for the switch, a circle to pass the shell of the PIR sensor and 2 LEDs.

Regarding cutting, I came across a problem. Indeed, I had planned to cut the facade to laser cutting, however, being plastic there was a risk of melting the upper part of the case. I preferred to cut everything myself by hand with the help of cutters, saws, drill and sandpaper.

Production time: 1h20

To begin, we must assemble the different connectors of the facade. The drilling is accurate, it takes almost no glue, it fits easily. I also glue the battery with duel opposite

cover to save space in the case.

Finally I assemble the rest of the components following the pattern made on Fritzing before placing everything in the box. I also added heat-shrink tubing for extra security and

solidity on the welds of the led.

I then close the assembly with the help of 4 screws located on each corner and I check that everything is working properly.

Step 4: Final Test

Everything works perfectly !

Thank you for following this tutorial and have fun with your new products !

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