Homemade Degaussing Coil

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Introduction: Homemade Degaussing Coil

I'm a big fan of video games & have a huge collection. I enjoy watching anime & love scie...

Warning, if you are not familiar with how to safely deal with electrical components then just spend the $40 to buy one of these. Not worth risking you life to save a few bucks. CRT's can have thousands of volts ready to be unleashed if you touch the wrong thing or work in them with both hands they can send a shock through one arm, through your heart to the other arm and stop your heart. I'm not responsible for your safety so please don't consider doing this if you don't know what your doing.

Things needed:

Black electrical tape

Soldering iron

Light bulb socket

100 watt light bulb

Some type of switch (mine taken from broken black and decker jigsaw)

CRT degaussing coil (taken from old computer monitor in my case)

Wall out plug with cord (need at least 6 feet of cord to give you plenty of slack to move the coil during degaussing process)

knife

Nylon ties (needed to hold switch housing firmly to coil)

Step 1: Readying the Degaussing Coil.

First I remove the degaussing coil from the old 15" monitor I had from 1997. I then made it in a figure 8 & folding it over doubling it up. I used a small circular trash can to get the circle size I needed taping it up & sliding it firmly over the can bottom & leaving it there for a few minutes. I then removed it & wrapped electrical tape around the entire coil to ensure it stayed round & as extra protection.

Step 2: Gathered Up Materials & Basic Layout.

Once I had my coil round I gathered all other materials needed & figured out how I was going to wire it all up. I put the bulb as close to the plug as possible so it could simply hang against the wall when plugged in & be out of the way of the degaussing process. I wired the trigger switch to where I could mount it directly against the coil using nylon ties & electrical tape to firmly hold it in place. This way I could squeeze the trigger switch with the same hand I am holding the coil with which makes it much easier. I used a 100 watt bulb as a resistor but if you want a stronger electromagnetic field you can use a lower wattage bulb but the 100 watt worked perfect for me. This thing is powerful.

Step 3: How to Degauss.

Here's some basic images showing how I degaussed my old CRT.

Step 4: TV Back to Normal.

I was really kind of amazed at how well this worked. I did a few hours of online research to figure out how I wanted to do my homemade degausser & I couldn't be happier with the results.

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    7 Discussions

    I will definitely keep this in mind next time I have to re-degauss my last analog CRT TV. last time I did this I did it by hand with a somewhat strong microwave ring magnet. but because of the "quality" of the construction just about any magnet will either add or subtract gausses.

    including ye refrigerator magnets!!

    the last one we bought was.. how should I put this... cheaply made but somehow survived the lightning strike nearby my old house shortly before we moved. well 3 or 4 power strip/ surge protectors fried, breakers tripped and the DTV converter box power adapter died. the excuse that we would get a new LCD TV when this one died went out the window quite shortly after moving. in the meantime our CRT is the basement tv now and if you look at it strongly it will get weird rainboie colors and need to be re-degaussed.

    it certainly didn't help that we lived near strong magnetic fields for 4 or 5 years next to an old-fashioned Hydro dam still in use. ( the clock on my iBookG4 which I used as a TV recording server had a significant!!!!!!!!!! amount of drift, I don't know whether it was from magnetic fields or vibrations affecting the time Crystal. what I do know is it went away after we moved and I ceased needing to constantly re-sync with an NTP server every day. )

    the house before that wasn't too bad and I don't know what was up with the basement apartment before that. so yes it's 2018 and we have a 10+ year old TV, one of the last manufacturing batches as I'm sure; that continues to work and we can't kill non-purposefully.

    Can this be used to erase hard drive data?

    1 reply

    I'm not sure but I'd sure be afraid of using it near any credit cards.

    :D @photony, my thought exactly..

    Here's some old school for ya.. Still insightful though!

    For new consoles LCD all the way of course. I use a 47" 1080p for my PS4, Wii U, PS3's, 360, Gamecube, Dreamcast.

    They are by far the best for older video game consoles and sadly they are slowly disappearing. I just bought 2 for $6 bucks other day and 27" flat screen and a 19" with built in vcr and all works, lol. Finding a place for them is the problem they are behemoths.