How to Make Chinese Egg Tarts

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About: I'm just your ordinary next door neighbor who just so happens to spend free time at the golf course, in her kitchen, traveling around the world, among many other activities. Mood: Excited to post new Instruc...

I absolutely love exploring Chinese bakeries. There are always a great combination of sweet treats and the fluffiest of bread, so these bakeries never disappoint. A staple in every Chinese bakery is the yummy, creamy, crispy egg tart.

With its signature crispy and flaky shell and silky, creamy filling, the egg tart is a perfect dessert after any meal. (That's why you always see them as a awesome finish after a delicious dim sum brunch).

Another plus? They are easy to make, and oh it's so worth it :)

Happy baking, and let me know in the comments how it all turns out!

Step 1: Ingredients

To make these delicious egg tarts, you'll need:

  • 1 sheet of puff pastry

For the filling:

  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 2.5 ounces hot water
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • pinch of salt

Step 2: Preparing the Pastry Dough

Before you start making the egg tarts, be sure to thaw the frozen puff pastry dough for about 20 minutes and also butter the pans that you are using. After, unfold the sheet and cut out large enough circles to fit into your pans. I used individual pans that were a little large compared to a usual egg tart, so I cut 4 circles on the one sheet.

Lay the circles of dough onto the tin and press the dough down. Poke holes on the bottom with a fork.

Also, preheat the oven at 350 degrees Fahrenheit.

Step 3: Making the Filling

Now it's time to make the filling!

First combine the hot water and the sugar. Mix until all the sugar dissolves, and then set it aside to let cool.

In another bowl, combine the eggs, milk, vanilla extract, and salt and whisk until smooth. Then, combine the two mixtures together. After, use a strainer and strain the mixture twice. This is the secret to making sure that the filling is smooth and silky :)

Pour the mixture (generously!) into each of the prepared tins.

Step 4: Baking and Finish!

Put the egg tarts in the oven and bake for about 30 minutes. You know when they are done when the filling stops jiggling and the crust is a nice golden brown color.

Egg tarts are definitely a great dessert to have at anytime, but I love them with tea or after some delicious dim sum. Enjoy these delicious treats (and make sure to let your friends and family have a bite :)

Happy baking!

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35 Discussions

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robboz4

1 year ago

I have made these several times now and they have all turned out excellent. Thanks for sharing the recipe.

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Sassi-Cindi

1 year ago

Yes, I think I could spend a lot of time looking at and eating at Chinese bakeries!! I wish I could translate the Chinese language so I could try all the great foods.

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Lentamentalisk

4 years ago

Just made this. So good! Half a box of puff pastry fills 9 cupcake spots, which is perfect for one batch of this.

temp_-1015620507.jpg

I have a vague recollection of eating one of these served cold. Are they usually served hot or cold?

I'm thinking muffin tins could be great for making a few at a time.

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Olivia Cheung

4 years ago

As a Chinese, I have to say that is not what Chinese egg tart looks like

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jen7714Olivia Cheung

Reply 4 years ago on Introduction

Yes, the tins that I used are slightly larger than the typical ones you would find in a bakery.

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Olivia Cheungjen7714

Reply 4 years ago

The normal Chinese egg tart usually doesn't have waves and it is smaller, of course.

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JW3Olivia Cheung

Reply 4 years ago on Introduction

There is no problem to change shape. If you want, it can become a star, square, heart-shaped...why not get a little more fun.

Oh, I'm Chinese too

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tanrazz

4 years ago on Introduction

This is one of my favorite Chinese pastries, and I can totally identify yours as Chinese egg tarts! They look delicious, and I'm looking forward to trying the recipe. I'm glad you showed that you used the Lactaid because my boyfriend is lactose intolerant. Thanks for posting this!

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jen7714tanrazz

Reply 4 years ago on Introduction

Great, I hope you make some for him! Thank you for such the sweet comment!

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Bohanka

4 years ago on Introduction

In China they are known as 'Dan Ta' and are very popular. My favourite kind are the ones with two sultanas placed at the bottom of the egg mix before baking. This ads a sweetness and an extra flavor.

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Wheatridge

4 years ago on Step 4

Thank you. You have shown me (extremely well, I must say) just how to make something I had missed in Chinese restaurants.

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jfrey1

4 years ago on Step 4

Thanks for this! I love Chinese bakeries, too! How about Almond cookies, next ;).

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annieannie

4 years ago on Introduction

I'm definitely going to try these. I wonder if you add fruit to them if they would still cook the same?

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jen7714annieannie

Reply 4 years ago on Introduction

Hmm...I'm not sure. I would assume the baking time would be approximately the same. Try it out!

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HollyHarken

4 years ago on Introduction

These look yummy! Thanks for posting this. I would use a blender to make the egg mixture. That way it will be smooth and may not even need straining. I am lucky that my mom gave me a glass 1 cup mini blender jar as I use it for oh so many things!! I have found them in plastic as well. It is worth investigating your specific blender and seeing is there are smaller jars available.