How to Make Cup From Rice Straw

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About: I am a Japanese inventor who is specializing in hairbrushes. I like making things with DIY. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2PggaysnpVM

Intro: How to Make Cup From Rice Straw

I made things with using “KENTAI” technique. Last time I used 0.1mm-thick wood shavings to make a drinking cup with the technoque (cf. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z8RtVfqUIUc). This time I chose rice straws to make a sake cup. The reason why I made it is I thought it’s wonderful to drink sake with the cup because sake is brewed from rice.

Step 1: Rice Straws

Use internodes (length: approx. 15~18cm) of rice straws.

1. Cut up an internode.

2. Open up the internode and make it flat.

3. Use rice glue (made from rice and 100% organic) to make a long strip (length: approx. 20m).

Step 2: Roll Up the String

Put a grain of rice into an internode to breathe life into the sake cup. And then roll up the strip by using the internode as an axis.

Step 3: Form Into Sake Cup With Kentai

Take advantage of "KentaiI" technique in order to form into a sake cup by gently pushing and sliding the coil with using fingers.

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Step 4: Sake Cup!

After forming, go through a urushi (Japanese lacquer) coating process. It took about a few months to finish up.

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    19 Discussions

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    Stravides

    13 days ago on Step 4

    I like this tutorial looks great once completed - I would make a couple of small edits - had to google what an internode was because never come across the word before - ie the bits between the knuckly bits - and as a result tried to google falt but figured you meant flat. I would be interested in what brands of glue and laquer you use. nice instructable..

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    ladybgood

    9 days ago

    I know less about this process than I did before I read the 'ible twice and watched the videos. I'm going to have to google a bunch of things here. For instance, googling KentaiI technique got me nothing remotely involving straw. This looks incredible and I'd love to try it but I need more info please.

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    Hairbrush Inventorladybgood

    Reply 9 days ago

    Kentai is a name of the technique in Japanese (I don't know what it is called in other regions) and it was named several decades ago, but this technique was known more than 1200 years ago. Kentai means to make a base by rolling a thin strip of wood. For the sake cup, I got an idea from wheat straw work (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8lucx1zRSmc 1:05~). With combining these two techniques, I found this unique way to make a sake cup.

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    ladybgoodHairbrush Inventor

    Reply 9 days ago

    when I google "kentai" I get reference to My Little Pony porn O_O. Thanks for explaining more. Looks fascinating and I will try to dig deeper.

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    Hairbrush Inventorladybgood

    Reply 9 days ago

    Sorry for the inconvenience.... Even here in Japan, not many people know about Kentai.

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    weish

    10 days ago

    that's absolutely beautiful. a longer writeup of your urushi process would be interesting, but the simplicity of this construction method is so elegant, and the result is stunning. where can you get rice straw, if you don't live near a farm growing it, does anyone sell it in bulk online?

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    Hairbrush Inventorweish

    Reply 9 days ago

    Thank you! We, Japanese live on rice, so it’s not hard to get rice straw here. You might be able to get it at online shops or use other reed plant stems instead.

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    teuthoid

    10 days ago

    Caution: Urushi lacquer contains the allergenic resin urushiol.The resin comes from plants closely related to poison ivy, so proper protective gear is a must, especially eye protection. For more info Google Urushi.

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    Jimichan

    9 days ago

    麗しい, but you really need to say more about the urushi process. Urushiol is the irritant in poison ivy, and I'm sure people need a little more detail in how to handle Japanese urushi lacquer.

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    Hairbrush InventorJimichan

    Reply 9 days ago

    This is a reference to urushi (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toxicodendron_vernicifluum). I got a bad rash when I started using urushi for the first time. It’s said that people contact urushi for the first time, most of them will get a rash, however, some of those who keep using urushi will become more resistant to it gradually. Even though I got a bad rash, I kept using urushi and finally got over it. I think urushi is so complicated and hard to handle, but it has great potential compared to other materials. That is why it has been still using even today (https://www.rekihaku.ac.jp/english/exhibitions/project/old/170711/index.html). Nowaday, you can find info about urushi in English through the internet. That is much better than my poor explanation about urushi in English.

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    terrefirma

    10 days ago on Step 4

    I wish you went more into detail as to specific processes as the end result is beautiful.

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    Hairbrush Inventorterrefirma

    Reply 10 days ago

    Sorry for the lack of explanation. I wish I could explain more... but hard to do that with my poor English. The urushi coating process that I worked on the sake cup is like this (apply urushi⇒dry off a day⇒polish the surface). I did that process at least twenty times to finish up,

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    gm280

    13 days ago

    A very interesting project. I never knew rice straws were hollow. That same technique could be used on other reed plant stems as well. Thumbs Up.

    1 reply