How to Make Slime Without Borax + Lesson Plan

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Introduction: How to Make Slime Without Borax + Lesson Plan

About: I work at instructables by day, and turn into a stitch witch by night. follow me on instagram @jessyratfink to see what i'm working on! ^_^

I've been playing with slime recipes recently, and I have to say this is my favorite one so far! This slime is fool-proof - I've never had a batch fail on me. It's stretchy and squishy and all the things that slime should be. :D

Also, this slime is borax-free! (Great for those who are worried about using borax in something that will be touched so much with bare skin.) It's also made with two common things found in many homes: baking soda and saline contact solution!

The base of this slime recipe is Elmer's school glue (clear or regular), which is easy to find online if your local stores are out of it.

Educators, Parents and Students: check out our free Lesson Plan on Step 8!

Slime Photo Challenge and Giveaway!

Make some slime and get a giveaway pack. Visit Step 9 for full details.

Step 1: Tools + Ingredients

Ingredients:

  • 5 oz bottle Elmer's school glue OR slightly less than 2/3 cup
  • 1 tablespoon baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons saline contact solution (needs to contain boric acid)
  • Food coloring as needed
  • Glitter if wanted

Double check that the saline contact solution you're using has boric acid as an ingredient, otherwise the recipe will not work.

Tools:

  • Bowl for mixing
  • Measuring spoons
  • Spoon for mixing
  • Small air-tight container for storing - ziploc baggies are a cheap and easy way to go. (optional)

Step 2: Combine the Glue and Baking Soda

In a small bowl, stir together the glue and the baking soda. Make sure the baking soda is entirely incorporated - there should be no dry bits left. The mix will look fairly cloudy.

Step 3: Add Food Coloring

Add a couple drops of food coloring and mix. Add more as needed to reach the color you want!

Step 4: Add the Contact Solution

Add one teaspoon of contact solution and stir well. The mix will start to become really sticky - stringing from the sides of the bowl and getting stuck to the spoon.

Add the second teaspoon slowly, stirring constantly. As soon as the mix starts to pull together and come away from the sides of the bowl, you've added enough!

At this point, you should have a slightly sticky lump of slime. :D

Step 5: Knead for 2-3 Minutes

When you first remove the slime from the bowl, it will be sticky and thin. To remedy this, you've got to knead it!

Work the slime between your hands and on a clean surface - stretching and compressing it. This will help it become less sticky, softer, and also allow it to stretch properly.

Once it's nice and stretchy, you're ready to play with it!

Step 6: Tip: Easy Clean Up

The slime sticks to itself like crazy, so you can use the blob of slime to clean up your bowl and spoon. Press the slime against any bits left and they will come away cleanly. :)

Step 7: Storing the Slime

This slime can be played with multiple times as long as you store it in an air tight container! As it ages, it will lose elasticity, but it's possible to knead it and bring some of it back.

You may find that it releases a bit of liquid as it's stored - knead that back in and you'll have nice stretchy slime again in no time. If the slime snaps when stretched, kneading will help make it softer again too!

Enjoy your slime!

P.S. I'd love to see pictures if you make it! :D

Step 8: Maker Lesson Plan: the Science of Slime Investigation

Looking to mix up your science class? Slime is a great way to bring making into the classroom and explore the scientific concepts of matter and non-Newtonian fluids. Check out our latest Instructables Maker Lesson Plan: The Science of Slime Investigation!

You'll find the PDF lesson plan attached to this step. In it, you'll find a lesson plan, teacher information guide and student data sheets.

Use our Maker Lesson Plan along with the recipe for a fun slime activity!

Step 9: Enter the Slime Challenge and Giveaway!

When you post a photo of your slime on:

  • This Instructable as an "I Made It",
  • Twitter,
  • - or - Instagram,

we’ll send you an Instructables giveaway pack!

Additionally, Instructables staff will feature the best recreations of this slime recipe on our Twitter and Instagram Stories (and tag you, of course).

Here's how to participate:

  • Create your slime by following the detailed instructions in this project.
  • Post a photo of your slime to Instagram and/or Twitter, tagging @instructables and #IblesSlime. (You’ll have to follow us on each platform so we can DM you.)
  • Alternatively, post your creation as an "I Made It" at the bottom of this project.
  • Giveaway opens on March 18, 2019. We must receive submissions and iterations of this project by April 8, 2019 (11:59pm Pacific Time) to be eligible for this offering.
  • Participants will be contacted on the Instructables site via PM by the end of April 2019 to claim their giveaway pack.

124 People Made This Project!

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67 Discussions

0
jessyratfink
jessyratfink

1 year ago

Hello again everyone! We've sent the prize claim PMs and many of you have already filled them out. Thanks so much!

Please reply to this comment or PM me if you haven't heard from us. We'll get it sorted. :)

0
LearnAtLaunchpad
LearnAtLaunchpad

8 months ago

This Instructable came in very handy for a team of students designing "fidget tools". The design called for a balloon filled with slime as a type of stress ball.

One of our 5th grade classes does a deep dive into design thinking and engineers an ideal fidget tool for a classmate (a student's idea). The project begins with an overview of the Design Thinking Process. At this grade level, we use a model that highlights: Ask, Imagine, Design, Build and Improve. This project goes for about 12 classes spread out over a month.

In a nutshell,
1) We first look at a variety of fidget toys (but we call them tools) and generate a collective list of common features. They are asked to identify the top 3 features most important to them.
2) Next they interview their assigned partner to ask questions and gather information about their partners interests and wants in a fidget tool.
3) CONSTRAINTS are introduced! TIME, size, materials, noise level and ability to make.
3) Students are challenged to come up with at least 3 different ideas for a fidget tool. From this, they will gather feedback from their "client" and narrow to a single design.
4) Students begin to prototype their designs. In engineering design, this is where they will rapidly test and reiterate with different materials and tools to make a working model of their idea.
5) When students have a working prototype, the client will provide feedback and students will reflect on what they would change/add, etc. if they had more time.



0
manskybook
manskybook

8 months ago

This is a good project and makes a slime that compares to others that use Borax as a primary ingredient. But please know that Borax has very low toxicity, and most people do not even have skin sensitivity to it (don't use any chemicals with open wounds unprotected). Also, if you must use a saline contact lens solution that contains boric acid, you are essentially using the same chemicals.

Also note that boric acid solutions have been used to treat eye ailments and irritation for perhaps a century; and borax is a common laundry enhancer used as long, or longer.

If you are ever concerned about a product (especially one like Borax that is mostly one compound), in the US you can simply search for "[borax] msds" and get the Material Safety Data Sheet for that product.

In any case, the production and use of slime should be supervised, and small children and animals ingesting it, or any of its ingredients, will likely have quite unpleasant stomach upset.

0
I-love-crafts
I-love-crafts

10 months ago

:( This didn't work out for me and i failed...BUT! I am followling you :) Because i absolutely LOVE your crafts!

0
MaraCreates
MaraCreates

1 year ago

I wanted to Thank you again for a recipe that works! We have used it several times now and each time it actually turns into Slime (I don't want to tell you how many fails we have had) we have even had success at adding 1/2 a cup of shaving cream to your recipe to make it fluffier and also make it smell better. :)

0
jessyratfink
jessyratfink

1 year ago

Hi everyone! Thank you so much for participating in our slime challenge :D

We're compiling all the entries now - I'll comment again once we've sent out PMs so y'all can claim your prizes. <3

0
chrystalm10
chrystalm10

Reply 1 year ago

Ok so i made this why havent i received my PM?

0
jessyratfink
jessyratfink

Reply 1 year ago

Your entry wasn't marked as an I Made It, so we had missed it! Found it and sending you a PM now. :)

0
ZaherT1
ZaherT1

1 year ago

very good

0
Lockettd
Lockettd

Tip 1 year ago

Add terms such as viscosity and force to better student understanding. The viscosity of the fluid increases when shear stress is applied. For example: Quicksand. Flour and water. Silly putty. Great twist to an old favorite.

Screen Shot 2019-04-05 at 3.43.07 PM.png
0
PPDB33
PPDB33

Question 1 year ago

My daughter and her friend made slime for this challenge but I cannot post the images. Any help?

0
Sock Puppet
Sock Puppet

Answer 1 year ago

Hi. The link isn't there for "I Made It" if you're using an ad blocker. HTH

0
PPDB33
PPDB33

Reply 1 year ago

Thanks for the response. I am able to follow the “I made it” link and can fill in a comment and even upload photos. However when I click “Post” I receive the error message “An unexpected error occurred”. I have tried from both mobile and desktop version of the site.
I also tried adding photos to this reply and get the same message, so maybe there is a restriction on my account? IDK? I don’t see anyone else with a problem so it must be something I’m doing...

0
Sock Puppet
Sock Puppet

Reply 1 year ago

I can't think of anything more. You might try an different browser on your desktop or use a friend's machine maybe. Good luck.

0
maximeroltaron
maximeroltaron

1 year ago

Wow, looks really to do, I will try it!

0
Kwitzats
Kwitzats

1 year ago

how is it borax free using a solution that must contain borax?

0
cocosoft
cocosoft

1 year ago

Hi., Not trying to be negative but wouldn't this slime be a tad dangerous if little ones ate the stuff? Wondering if they would need to be supervised with it, or is it indeed safe?

0
kwalletje
kwalletje

Reply 1 year ago

This would also be true for storebought slime. If you think your kids might try to eat it, don't let them play with it. And this isn't only an age limit. Though storebought slime might say it's intended for kids over 3 years of age, you'd still have to make your own judgement. If your kids at age 6 still puts anything in it's mouth, you may have to wonder if it's wise to let them play with these kind of "toys".

Eating toys at any ages can be hazardous...

0
Leah young
Leah young

Question 1 year ago on Step 9

Could you please help me understand how to join this contest and post a picture