How to Make Your Own Worbla

Intro: How to Make Your Own Worbla

Hey Cosplayers, in todays apprenticeship on Forging with Thermoplastics, I'll be teaching you how to make your very own Worbla! No more Paying an arm and a leg, this stuff is even better than worbla, I call it PolyArmor!

Step 1: Watch the Video

CLICK HERE TO WATCH ON MOBILE

Begin this Tutorial by watching the video!

Step 2: What You Will Need

Ingredients

Polly Plastics Moldable Plastic

White Baking Flour

That's All, super easy recipe eh?

Step 3: Assemble Ingredients

Take Equal Parts of both the Polly Plastics Moldable plastic and Baking Flour

Shake them together well in a Tupperware dish.

Then spread the mixture out into a thin circle on a cookie sheet

Step 4: Bake Your Mixture

Set the oven to 350 F

Place your mixture in for about 10 Minutes or until the plastic pellets turn transparent.

Step 5: All You Knead Is PolyArmor ;)

Pull it out of the oven and let it cool for a moment until you feel comfortable handling it to blend it together and knead it all.

Don't let it sit too long though or it will be too hard to work with and you will have to reheat.

Step 6: Roll It Out Flat

Using a Pasta maker or a rolling pin, roll out the "dough" into a nice flat smooth sheet of your desired thickness!

Step 7: Finishing Touches

The beauty of PolyArmor is that unlike Worbla PolyArmor is very smooth already and requires no layering priming, sanding, or sealing before you can paint it. You can just paint it and it has a beautiful sheen!

It's better than worbla, it is PolyArmor!!!

Get your plastic here to make some of your own!

Step 8: Conclusion

If you love this apprenticeship, maybe you will love some of my other ones

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    40 Discussions

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    cspangler

    25 days ago

    I know this post is a couple years old, but I was wondering if there were any problems with this stuff melting in the sun, or loosing shape in hot environments. Like will my armor melt if I have to walk from a convention center to a restaurant on a hot day?

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    tazmo8448

    1 year ago

    guess if I have to ask what a Worbla is I don't need one

    8 replies
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    Plastic Apprenticetazmo8448

    Reply 7 months ago

    Haha, it is a thermoplastic sheet that you can use to shape for any kind of molding/ modeling project you want. it can take complex curves and cools hard. It can be reheated and reshaped as many times as you want or need. :)

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    Plastic Apprenticetazmo8448

    Reply 1 year ago

    Hahaha :) Worbla is a thermoplastic sheet frequently used by Cosplayers to make armor, but it can have many other crafting and DIY uses as well :)

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    tazmo8448Plastic Apprentice

    Reply 1 year ago

    thanks for cluing me in...is that some sort of Dungeons & Dragons sort of thing? or just a overall role playing deal.

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    Plastic Apprenticetazmo8448

    Reply 7 months ago

    Cosplay in general, any fandom from any genre :) Star Wars to Lord of the Rings to Marvel to DC

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    syates3tazmo8448

    Reply 1 year ago

    From the Pages of the Worbla bible....

    10171626_883326085029239_7869724973639273524_n.jpg
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    mizrie

    1 year ago

    Fantsstic money saving idea! I am in the UK, is Polymorph Plastimake the same thing as Polyplastics mouldable plastics?

    2 replies
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    Plastic Apprenticemizrie

    Reply 7 months ago

    Yes, they are the same type of material, you may need to play with the porportions of flour to plastic as different brands of the plastic pellets have slight variations in their consistency.

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    Plastic Apprenticemizrie

    Reply 1 year ago

    Polymorph would probably be a good alternative to Polly plastics if you live outside of the US. They are both PCL and I think that their qualities are similar.

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    Iskelderon

    1 year ago

    Quite interesting! What's the shelf life of this? Won't the flour component spoil over time?

    1 reply
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    Plastic ApprenticeIskelderon

    Reply 7 months ago

    I have had stuff I have made out of it for about 2 years now with no sign of degredation or spoiling

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    TrishaB19

    1 year ago

    I keep seeing poly plastic pellets "cornhole blend" is there any difference, or is that the same

    1 reply
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    GenevieveH3

    1 year ago

    How much of the pellets did you use to create one "sheet"?

    1 reply
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    Horolaggia

    1 year ago

    How much of each did you use in the video? I'm trying to work with this for the first time and would just like to know how much of the plastic to use per sheet? Like, a tablespoon of plastic + a tablespoon of flour or is it more?