Indoor Hammock Wall Mount

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About: Freelance web+iOS+type designer+developer & open source fanatic.

I love hammocks so I wanted to try and sleep in one indoors. I live in an apartment but opening the big window makes it almost like sleeping outside.

TOOLS

  • Router with chamfer bit
  • Drill
  • Jig Saw

SUPPLIES

  • Wood - preferably some hard/durable type. I used oak: 4x 50mm*120mm*18mm
  • 2 Metal pins (I cut two screws)
  • 8 Screws + raw plugs (depending on your wall - I have brick walls)
  • Finish - I used kitchen table oil
  • Rope
  • Hammock

NOTES

  • Wood: Only make the inner hole as wide as needed for the rope to fit. I wasn't sure what rope I wanted to use so mine is wider than needed. Obviously narrower = more strength.
  • Metal pins: Use proper pins if you have them. If you cut some from screws like I did then make sure to use fairly big screws (mine have 4mm diameter) that are long enough so you only use the unthreaded part.
  • Studs: I have brick walls so spreading out the screws as much as possible was ideal. If you have studs then I'd recommend using 2 screws instead of 4 and aim for the centre of the stud. The screws should be as long as possible and you might want to test somewhere else if you need to drill a small pilot hole or not.
  • Concrete: I'd probably use 2 long expansion screws/bolts instead of 4 screws.

Step 1: Cut + Glue

  1. Drill, cut and mill (sorry - I didn't take any pictures of the actual process but it's a simple build:)
    1. I recommend drilling, sawing and milling the inner holes first as it's easier to handle the router when you have a bigger surface.
      1. Notice that the grove for the metal pins is cut in the back plate.
    2. Cut the metal pins in the right length
      1. I didn't have any metal pins lying around so I cut two screws instead using only the unthreaded part.
    3. Glue together the plates (remember the pins)

    Step 2: Apply Finish and Mount It on the Walls

    I used this website to calculate the height:

    http://theultimatehang.com/hammock-hang-calculator...

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    78 Discussions

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    ScottG46

    2 years ago

    Wall Studs are not designed to carry a load horizontally. They do not use premium 2x4s in houses unless the home owner asks for it.

    2 replies
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    mjohnson35larsenwork

    Reply 1 hour ago

    Brick walls are not designed to take horizontal forces either. There are many horror storries of hammock and brick structures.

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    Malkariscfowler2

    Reply 2 years ago

    I know this is a bit stale, but Wow that blew my mind, then I realized that's the force you'd need to maintain to hold a shallow angle. Naturally my hammock sinks down to a deeper angle. I want to do something like this for my son.

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    rtormet

    2 years ago

    I hung a hammock in one of my extra rooms too... But i was so worried about taking down a wall or having things rip out that i spanned a 2x4 across 3 studs and screwed them in with 2 lag bolts per stud. Then to hang it I used a pretty thick U bolt that went through the 2x4 right in the center. To make the hammock removable i used a threaded carabiner. Works great but doesnt looks ANYWHERE near as nice as yours! welll done!

    1 reply
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    rocketsurgery

    2 years ago

    Thanks for your attractive hammock wall mount... it's just brilliant! I know how difficult it is to find suitable wall mounting hardware, as I have recently mounted an indoor hammock myself. In the end I used a gate hinge fitting with coach bolts going entirely through the block wall. I then attached a chunky D shackle to connect a carabiner to, making it easy to pack away (into a wall cupboard at one end). Anyway, great job and thanks for sharing!

    Hammock.jpg
    1 reply
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    larsenworkrocketsurgery

    Reply 2 years ago

    Thanks, thought about adding a carabiner but I have made it so the robe has a big knot in the end and loops around it so I can easily hang it on just one side if I need the space.

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    vladivastok

    2 years ago

    "Your brackett's are nice & all. I just dont think anchoring a hammock to just one stud would do the trick, unless you weigh in at 80 pound's or less. IM in at 240 , & wouldn't try it without branching out to at least 2 stud's. Maybe 3. Please let me know what weight you may have tested it out at." thank's [VLAD]]

    1 reply
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    larsenworkvladivastok

    Reply 2 years ago

    I have brick walls, if you have studs then it depends on how they were constructed.

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    mddeming

    2 years ago

    Just one question. How did you cut rectangular holesd as shown in the diagrams and end up with elliptical holes in the finished picture?

    1 reply
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    larsenworkmddeming

    Reply 2 years ago

    ? http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/bt_chamf.html

    gr8 hanging points they look really good. Nice instructable, when i´ll finnish knotting my hammock i´ll make these. Thnx for the how-to

    3 replies
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    Rich_Limburgerlarsenwork

    Reply 2 years ago

    Hi Larson, sorry for the long time it took me to answer. I almost finished my hammock, purchased a cloth hammock at a bagain so i will most certainly make your wallmounts. As soon as i've finnished them i'll post the picture(s) here.

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    Warholm

    3 years ago on Introduction

    Please excuse my waryness ;-)
    Did you lie / sleep in this already?
    How often so far?
    Do you see any deformation / wear?
    And if I may be personal ;-) how much do you weigh?
    I see the pessimists comment, and I am one too BUT 'the proof of the pudding is in the eating' If you have tested this, and it holds, it is probably OK.
    6mm (1/4") expansion bolts happly hold 200 kg (400lb) in concrete...
    If it was a commercial product you would have to prove it could hold something like 8 times the ordinary load. so we are used to seeing things at larger dimensions...

    Having said that I would probably not put somthing I would not want to fall on underneath :-D

    1 reply
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    larsenworkWarholm

    Reply 3 years ago on Introduction

    Every night for the last 6-7 days. No wear. 70kg. Non-commercial. Plenty of sturdy.