Laptop Stand for Your Netbook

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Introduction: Laptop Stand for Your Netbook

About: I am an artist, educator, tinkerer, and repurposer, err, recycler.

Most laptop stands are made for full sized laptops.

I looked forever for a suitable stand for my collection of Eee Pc netbooks. Everything was either too big, too expensive, or just plain didn't exist. Eventually I headed off to my favorite store - IKEA - to look for a solution.

A couple of hours and a few dollars later I had my solution.

This instructable is made for a netbook. It will work with most netbooks up to 10 inches in size. It is constructed with 2 plastic shelf brackets, 2 drawer handles, a couple of telescopic bolts (optional) and and cabinet screws. Basic tools such as a miter saw, a snap-off blade knife, and a screwdriver are all you need to complete the project. 

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Step 1: The Parts

Here are links to the Ikea components:

Stodis Shelf Brackets http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/30167461
0.50 each

Attest Handles http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/90038541
$3.99 a pair
You can also use any other style 4 to 5 inch handle. Just remember that you'll need 2.

One pair of screws that come with the handles and one pair of half inch screws. If you use Ikea components you'll need to make sure to the smaller pair is in metric size.

Optional: one pair of 5/8" telescopic bolts just to cover the unused hole and make everything look extra sweet. Not necessary. http://www.awt-gpi.com/product75.htm

A saw. You can use a dovetail saw, a miter saw, a jig saw. Whatever you have access to will probably work just fine.

Sandpaper and a sharp knife for cleaning up the edges.

Screwdriver.

Step 2: Making the Pattern and Cutting the Brackets

I traced one of the shelf brackets onto a piece of sturdy paper, cut it out, and used it to and then cut one end down until I arrived at the right height. for the stand.

From there it's pretty straightforward. Mark each bracket and cut.

Trim any extra bits away and sand off any rough edges.

Step 3: Assembly

Easy as pie.

Step 4: Using Your NetBook Stand!

I use the stand when I want to work with a full sized keyboard or if I want to raise the screen a little higher for watching videos, etc. 

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    25 Discussions

    0
    DIYfan
    DIYfan

    3 years ago

    Really nice - simple, cheap and functional. It's fairly interesting looking as well. I have way too many laptops, including three Chromebooks. It's a pain to think of putting $60 into commercial stands. This looks like a viable way out of that .problem.

    0
    bertus52x11
    bertus52x11

    4 years ago

    This is very nice! Great idea!

    0
    kathleenhenri

    Just wanted to let all of you know that I have reworked this Instructable and incorporated a lot of the ideas from the comments below.

    Thanks everyone!

    0
    Da_huuudge
    Da_huuudge

    10 years ago on Step 2

    Fab. This has inspired me, I bet there are loads of things you could make re-appropriating Ikea bits. Did you think about adding a second handle to stop the stand snow ploughing?

    0
    Rich99
    Rich99

    10 years ago on Introduction

    if you cut off an inch (or three) from the rear legs of the brackets, that would decrease the angle of the keyboard. great 'ible. (much better than my plywood with legs and hinges project!)

    0
    kathleenhenri
    kathleenhenri

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    Also a great idea. I think I could make a half-dozen stands based on everyone's suggestions.

    0
    Tape-structable

    Pretty steep, but nice design and idea. Good use of the shelf brackets!

    0
    Xamu
    Xamu

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    It may be possible to use just a single bracket (rather than a pair) with the same other parts with to achieve a less steep angle. Here's how:

    1) take a single bracket and cut it at 45° at the corner making two identical half brackets. (A hack saw will probably provide cleaner results than a typical hand saw for wood. Just take your time and focus on making it look nice.) Sand the cuts lightly to remove sharp edges and for appearance.

    2) drill and mount the shelf supports as previously described

    3) mount the drawer handle to join the two half brackets at the thicker end as previously described

    Voila! The attached drawer handle becomes the elevating support.

    If the angle is too low now, use a bunch of washers (as spacers) and either longer drawer handle screws or threaded rod & nylon lock nuts to adjust the angle.

    Also, if you wanted to do this for a larger laptop, you could use a wider handle, such as Ikea's LANSA handle http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/60138759 which comes in 10 1/16", 13 7/8", 21 7/16", and longer.

    Good idea! You are to be commended.

    0
    kathleenhenri
    kathleenhenri

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    Your idea is great as well. . . maybe a new instructable should be in the works . . .

    0
    kathleenhenri
    kathleenhenri

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    Thanks, I am still refining the idea. I think this stand is best used with an external keyboard. I tried the set-up using the "inside" of the IKEA brackets, the angle was not as steep that way, but the laptop was not fully supported along its base. I may post some other solutions soon.

    0
    richelton
    richelton

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    How about using a second drawer pull handle on the back of the stand, handle facing outward toward the back through the bottom set of shelf bracket holes. That will make your stand more sturdy and also provide a small 'shelf' on which to rest your wireless keyboard when it is not in use, standing up across the back of the stand.

    0
    kathleenhenri
    kathleenhenri

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    Another great idea - by the weekend I'll put together some of suggestions here and post the results.

    0
    kathleenhenri
    kathleenhenri

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    I guess it depends on how you'll use them - whether they run linux or not (mine do). There are many, many eee pc models out there. I like mine (I have 3) and would not own any other brand.

    0
    Chromatica
    Chromatica

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    what are the differences with linux compared to xp

    0
    kathleenhenri
    kathleenhenri

    Reply 10 years ago on Introduction

    There are no quick answers to that question because there are many, many varieties and looks to Linux. Linux is open source software, and as such, it is all free. If you are interested, take a look at Ubuntu, Linux Mint 7, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, or Crunchbang to start. You can look at them on their websites and you can also see them in action on Youtube. You can also download and burn discs of the various operating systems and try them out without changing anything on your windows computer.

    0
    isacco
    isacco

    10 years ago on Introduction

    I like this instructable! The components are easy to find. The assembling is very easy and fast. The end result is well finished and looks nice. On the other hand, the notebook position is good only if you use an external keyboard. Congratulations! Isacco

    0
    ScottSEA
    ScottSEA

    10 years ago on Introduction

    Also looks great for use on airplanes - probably fit on a tray table very nicely, and bring the screen up nicely for viewing.

    0
    biggy smalls
    biggy smalls

    10 years ago on Introduction

    probably great for watching movies. also good for using a laptop as a home pc.