Lazy Man Bread | 4 Ingredients Bread Recipe | No Knead | No Machine

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Introduction: Lazy Man Bread | 4 Ingredients Bread Recipe | No Knead | No Machine

About: Hey y'all! My name is Lydia and I want to share my passion for cooking/baking with everyone!

Today we are talking bread. In my humble opinion, nothing beats a slice or two of homemade bread that has been slathered in good quality (salted) butter. Unfortunately most of us are always lacking time and the last thing we want to do is wait around to make bread. I have the perfect solution for those of you who want fresh bread and are not willing to compromise on store bought bread. This Lazy Man Bread is really only four ingredients that you should have on hand and you do not have to knead it, thats right, no kneading goes into this bread which may sound controversial but we are going to allow "time" to knead our bread and allow the gluten to form which will result in a soft chewy bread. Did I mention that you don't even need a bread machine to make this bread? Well you don't, however you will need a dutch oven or two cast iron skillets to bake this bread and I'll get into why later on. So if you want to make your own homemade Lazy Man Bread, follow along with me step by step and check out my video. Let's go!

Supplies:

Some of the tools I used for this recipe

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Step 1: Ingredients

  • 3 Cups all-purpose Flour
  • 1 ¾ teaspoons Salt
  • ½ teaspoon Active Yeast
  • 1 ½ Cups room temperature Water
  • Cooking Converter (if you need help converting the measurements)

Step 2: Mix Flour, Salt and Yeast

In a big mixing bowl, mix in flour, salt, and yeast until incorporated. When you add your salt and yeast to the flour, add the salt on one side of your bowl and the yeast on the other side of the bowl. Then slowly mix everything together. The reason that you don't want the the salt and yeast touching is because you run the risk of killing the yeast if it touches the salt right away. Once the salt is mixed into the flour that should not be a problem.

Step 3: Add Water and Combine

Next add in the water and mix until your mixture is completely incorporated (you might want to use your hands to bring everything together). I stared using a wooden spoon and then I switched to my hands. You don't want to knead the bread, you just want to use your hands to combine the flour with the water. When everything is combined, the dough should be shaggy and slightly wet.

Step 4: Wait 18 Hours

Cover your bowl with plastic wrap and let it sit at room temperature for 18 hours (your house shouldn’t be too hot or too cold). I also placed a clean kitchen towel over the plastic wrap. Since we are not kneading this dough, it does need to wait 18 hours so the gluten can forms.

What I like to do is make this bread a little bit later in the afternoon and then the next day I just bake it. That is why I called this bread lazy man bread, you basically combined all the ingredients and forget about it until the next day when you need to bake it.

Step 5: Preheat Oven

After 17-18 hours, preheat your oven to 450 and make sure you put your Dutch oven with the lid on inside the oven so it heats up with the oven. I allow this to heat for about half and hour to an hour.

Also if you don't have a dutch oven but you have two cast iron skillets, that are the same size, you can place those inside the oven and use those instead of the dutch oven, you would use one of the cast iron skillets as a "lid" and the other to hold/bake the bread. I recommend that you use a dutch oven or cast iron skillets to get a nice crust on the outside and even baking on the inside. I personally never used anything else.

Step 6: How to Know If the Gluten Has Formed

When you take the towel and plastic wrap off of the outside of the bowl which your bread is resting in, the bread should have risen twice or triple in size. The top should be bubbly like my picture and smell yeasty. When you pull the sides away, you should be able to see the gluten strands that have formed underneath.

Step 7: Flour Work Surface

Flour your work surface and hands and place the dough onto the floured work surface.

Step 8: Form the Dough

Form the dough by bringing it together and forming tense on the top to create a round shape. Refer to the video to see the method I used.

Step 9: Add Dough to Dutch Oven

Pull your pot and lid out of the oven once it is heated and sprinkle the bottom with flour and carefully add your bread in. Add the hot lid to the pot. Make sure you are using gloves and work slowly and carefully because you can easily burn yourself.

Step 10: Bake the Bread

Bake your bread in the oven with the lid on for 30 minutes. Take the lid off and bake another 15-20 minutes or until your bread is golden brown. Take it out of your oven.

Step 11: Allow Bread to Cool Completely

Remove your bread from the pot, cool on cooling rack, I used my gloves to pull the bread out of the hot pot (again be careful, I've burned myself before because I was trying to work fast and I wasn't very careful). Once the bread is at room temperature you can cut into.

Step 12: Enjoy!

Enjoy your homemade bread however you like, I slathered butter on mine. The outside is crusty and the inside is soft, pillowy and chewy, way better than anything that you buy at your local grocery store.

Step 13: Video Tutorial

If you want to watch the video tutorial, watch it here!

3 People Made This Project!

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14 Discussions

0
megg
megg

13 days ago

I made this first following the recipe and again just now with 1 cup whole wheat flour and 2 cups white (instead of 3 cups white) and I believe the second one is even better than the original!

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0
FOOD by Lyds
FOOD by Lyds

Reply 13 days ago

I'm so glad to hear that mixing the whole flour in worked as well! Thanks for sharing, I really appreciate it =)

0
JAMESM466
JAMESM466

8 weeks ago

My first job. as a kid, was working in a bakery. We'd start at about 4:00 in the morning, making bread and rolls. This was a kosher bakery and we used no preservatives. If you didn't eat it by 8:00 that night, it got hard as a rock. I have fond memories of waiting for fresh, leathery rye bread to come out of the oven. We kept a crock of salted butter handy to do "quality control". Unfortunately, I have developed a gluten sensitivity and cannot enjoy wheat flour based breads. It's the crust I miss the most.

Thanks for bringing these memories back "fresh" for me.

0
FOOD by Lyds
FOOD by Lyds

Reply 8 weeks ago

I'm so sorry to hear that you have a gluten sensitivity, I've heard that einkorn wheat is a great choice if you have a gluten sensitivity because it isn't hybridized which makes it super digestible. I'd love to have that bakery experience since bread and rolls and the best smelling things in the world but only for a few day because 4 am is early =)

0
JAMESM466
JAMESM466

Reply 7 weeks ago

I don’t have a Dutch Oven. Can a heavy lidded pot work?

0
FOOD by Lyds
FOOD by Lyds

Reply 7 weeks ago

I'm not sure to be honest, if it's oven safe and it retains heat well like a Dutch Oven I'm thinking it might work.

0
JAMESM466
JAMESM466

Reply 7 weeks ago

I'll give it a whirl and let you know if the house doesn't burn down. I have obtained the flour you recommended and can't wait to give it a try.

0
FOOD by Lyds
FOOD by Lyds

Reply 7 weeks ago

You got this! Especially from your experience in the bakery 😁

1
JAMESM466
JAMESM466

Reply 8 weeks ago

I know what you mean. 4 a.m is early, but you get used to it. The hard part was going home, showering and then going to school. But, for a 14 year old, the money was nice. I also got experience decorating cakes, making donuts and making pastries.

0
JacquiL8
JacquiL8

Question 8 weeks ago

Hi, have you tried this with wholemeal flour? Just wondering if it would work as well. This looks lovely :)

0
FOOD by Lyds
FOOD by Lyds

Reply 8 weeks ago

Hi Jacqui, I have not. I think it would work but the bread might be a bit more dense. Sorry I don't have a better answer.

1
garrydelf
garrydelf

Reply 7 weeks ago

You will have to experiment with whole wheat flour. If it is a coarse grind the sharp edges of the flakes cut the bubbles and can actually cause the dough to not rise at all. Best bet is to use whole wheat bread flour which is not available everywhere.

0
obillo
obillo

Question 8 weeks ago on Step 2

How about first stirring in the yeast, then when thoroughly combine, stirring in the yeast?

0
FOOD by Lyds
FOOD by Lyds

Reply 8 weeks ago

That would work as well, as long as the salt and yeast are not directly touching each other.