Learn to Do Aluminum Sand Casting

About: MSFN is "Makin Sumthin from Nuthin", I suggest you do the same! Basically I take inventory of what I have laying around that most likely cost me nothing, and building something useful and fully functional ou...

MSFN = Makin Sumthin From Nuthin !
A Detailed Video Aluminum Casting Lesson Covering Everything You Need To Know As a Beginner Metal Caster To Get Started. A Start to Finish Video. Starting With An Idea and Casting Up a Finished Project…..

Watch The Video To Learn Details about Placing Patterns, Ramming Up The Flask, Putting in Sprues, Gates & a Riser then Finishing Off The Casting To Produce The Finished Product.

LEARN TO MAKE THE SAND HERE:

https://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Green-Sand-for...

LEARN TO MAKE A FURNACE HERE:

https://www.instructables.com/id/Making-a-Brass-Cas...

LEARN TO MAKE THE CASTING FLASKS HERE:

https://www.instructables.com/id/Flask-Making-for-S...

LEARN MORE SAND CASTING TIPS WITH ANOTHER TUTORIAL HERE:

https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Do-Aluminum...

PLEASE FOLLOW, FAVORITE & SHARE! :)

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    51 Discussions

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    MichaelandDebbieM

    2 years ago

    when grinding on aluminum ,i use grinding wheels for concrete. they do not load up like the others do. i get mine from harbor freight. the cheap ones.

    1 reply
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    Laral

    2 years ago

    This is just what I needed to see. I want to make an aluminum slingshot like the classic English 'Milbro Catapult Forks'. No longer made but there are knock-offs from England. Postage is high. If only I could get a plaster or silicone cast of one… Otherwise will have to carve out a model.

    I see you made a video on how to make the furnace you use in your video. You should also embed that below the above video.

    BRASS MELTING FURNACE - EZ BUILD - YouTube

    a634994797971884765.jpeg
    4 replies
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    that would be a simple cast to do... I could knock it out in about 25 min IF I had the pattern. One could always make the pattern from wood or using a 3-D printer...got friends with one of those ?

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    That's what I thought, and yet, you have to pay $50 for one by the time you factor in VAT tax and international shipping. I even posted that in a forum topic on the brand and they deleted it. A 3-D printer would be nice but I don't have access to one. I'm thinking Fimo.

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    I see you added links to your other Instructables. I will have to study them all. Thanks.

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    andrewty

    2 years ago

    acetylene is too hot for melting aluminium.

    Propane is plenty hot enough.

    Oxygen is also too hot.

    A good propane/air burner will melt lead and aluminium.

    But probably not cast iron. That needs quite a bit more heat. Oxy/propane is probably OK for cast iron.

    1 reply

    I don't recall ever having referenced acetylene in any of my casting videos. I believe I can melt cast iron in my brass furnace using propane with forced air. I would never use pure oxygen under any circumstances for casting purposes. Thx for watching & commenting!

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    bc1235

    2 years ago

    I've been wanting to tackle sand casting for a long time. Thanks for the tutorial. Going to try it soon!!!

    1 reply
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    stumpja

    2 years ago

    Thanks for the tutorial. Very well done.

    1 reply
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    PhyllisL

    2 years ago

    Will the aluminum stay molten enough to melt it with an acetylene torch?

    1 reply

    i have an Oxy Set, never actually tried it so dont know. My guess is no because you need the crucible soaking in heat and a torch will only heat a small area. May work but probly not cost effective.

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    p0laris

    2 years ago

    Very interesting to see. Thanks for making the video (what is it you brushed on everything before soldering?)

    1 reply
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    GraemeP3

    2 years ago

    What an interesting video! It took me right back to the 80's when I first learnt sand mould casting.

    I like the idea of making a pouring spout separately although we just made a shallow hollow right next to the pouring spout and linking it to with a short channel, almost like you made on the flask bottom, next to the pattern.

    I also watched your video on the green sand and there I just have a question or two. In my days we got our sand from a supplier and if it were to dry we added in raw linseed oil. The reason for this is that the oil has a much higher boiling point and thus the vaporization point is higher too. You don't want vaporization because that can cause a small explosion inside you mould, especially when casting a higher volume of metal. On average we would hand cast a volume of about 1-1,5 gallon of metal.

    Our casting temperature was about 1100°F if my conversion from Celsius is correct. We had a lot of burnt sand which we had to discard afterwards.

    Nonetheless, a very interesting video and I think I should just get my hands dirty with some casting!

    Graeme Pierson

    South Africa

    2 replies

    The gases produced are permeated thru the sand itself unless the sand is too "wet". Many times a riser or vent isnt needed on small castings but I tend to use them in most situations . There is a fine line between too wet and too dry a sand but just takes practice :)

    Hi

    Thanks for watching & commenting :) The sand mixture I use although slightly damp is not "wet" and a steam explosion is relatively unheard of during the pouring process unless a highly excessive amount of water is used. There is water based casting sand (demonstrated) as well as oil bonded sands that you refer to. Both Work and work well. Melt temps are as follows:

    Aluminum: 1,220 F

    Brass: 1,710-1,830 F (depending on type)

    Copper: 1,983 F

    Cast Iron: 2,060-2,200 F (depending on type)

    This sand mixed the way I showed in that vid will easily cast all of these metals. I have casted all but the cast iron due to the limitations of the crucible I am using. Melting cast iron in a steel crucible isnt safe. Need a clay/graphite crucible.