Linear Hall Sensor--For CubeSat

This was a group project for our classroom at school. Our names of the group are Logan, Caleb, and Jevin: and our team name was Golden Comics Inc..We are simulating a research flight to Mars to test for the magnetic field of Mars. We used a linear hall sensor and sd card holder hooked-up to our elegoo board to record the field. This Instructable is based off of NASA's cubesats. Cubesats are small 100mm x 100mm x 100mm picosatellites that weigh under 1.330 kg. Cubesats are flown on pre-planned rocket flights for specific ranges of research. Our cubesat is going to hold the arduino board, battery, wires, and sensor. More information about cubesats are at the NASA website here: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/cubesats/overv...

Step 1: Materials List

Step 2: Building a CubeSat

For the cube that we put the Arduino in itself, we 3-D printed the cuesat. If you are unable to get a printer, you can make your own out of anything you can find such as legos, popsicle sticks, or metal frames.

Step 3: Wiring the Linear Hall Sensor

  • Yellow Wire From A0 to A0 on Linear Hall Sensor
  • Red Wire From GND to G on Linear Hall Sensor
  • Orange Wire From 5V to + on Linear Hall Sensor
  • Brown Wire from 4 to D0 on Linear Hall Sensor

Step 4: Coding the Linear Hall Sensor

int led = 13 ; // LED on arduino
int digitalPin = 3; // linear Hall magnetic sensor digital interface int analogPin = A0; // linear Hall magnetic sensor analog interface int digitalVal ; // digital readings int analogVal; // analog readings void setup () { pinMode (led, OUTPUT); pinMode (digitalPin, INPUT); //pinMode(analogPin, INPUT); Serial.begin(9600); } void loop () { // Read the digital interface digitalVal = digitalRead(digitalPin) ; if (digitalVal == HIGH) // When magnetic field is present, Arduino LED is on { digitalWrite (led, HIGH); } else { digitalWrite (led, LOW); } // Read the analog interface analogVal = analogRead(analogPin); Serial.println(analogVal); // print analog value }


Step 5: Wiring the SD Card Adapter to the Linear Hall Sensor

  • Yellow Wire From A0 to A0 on Linear Hall Sensor
  • Red Wire From GND to G on Linear Hall Sensor
  • Orange Wire From 5V to + on Linear Hall Sensor
  • Brown Wire from 4 to D0 on Linear Hall Sensor
  • Green Wire From GND to GND on Micro SD Card Memory Shield
  • Blue Wire From Red Wire on Linear Hall Sensor to VCC on Micro SD Card Memory Shield (Remember the Red Wires is 5V so since we don't have another 5V for the SD Card Memory Shield that is why we are connecting the blue wire from the Red Wire to the VCC to make things easier)
  • Purple Wire From 12 to MISO on Micro SD Card Memory Shield
  • Grey Wire From ~11 to MOSI on Micro SD Card Memory Shield
  • Light Green Wire From 13 to SCK on Micro SD Card Memory Shield
  • Black Wire from ~10 to CS on Micro SD Card Memory Shield

Step 6: Coding the SD Card Adapter to the Linear Hall Sensor

#include <Wire.h>
#include <SD.h>
#include <SPI.h>
File LinearData;  //name of file
float magnetic; //variable to hold data
int led = 13 ; // LED on arduino
int digitalPin = 3; // linear Hall magnetic sensor digital interface
int analogPin = A0; // linear Hall magnetic sensor analog interface
int digitalVal ; // digital readings
int analogVal; // analog readings
void setup() {
  pinMode (10, OUTPUT); //must set pin 10 to output
  pinMode (7, OUTPUT); //for LED, which is optionable. we didn't use one, so data collection doesn't get effected by this.
  SD.begin (4); // this is to begin collecting and transfering data to the SD card
{
  pinMode (led, OUTPUT); 
  pinMode (digitalPin, INPUT); 
  //pinMode(analogPin, INPUT);  
  Serial.begin(9600);
  }
}
void loop() {  
  analogVal = analogRead(analogPin); 
  LinearData = SD.open ("log.txt", FILE_WRITE);
  if (LinearData) { 
  
  Serial.print("Magnetic = "); // Prints the data collected to the serial monitor
  Serial.print(magnetic);
  Serial.print(" Gs");   // Gs is the abbreviation of the variable Gauss
Serial.println(analogVal); // print analog value
   LinearData.println(analogVal); // this is to print the data to the file created above
    
   
  
    digitalWrite(7, HIGH);
    delay(500); 
    digitalWrite(7, LOW);
    delay(500);
    LinearData.close();  
    
  }
{
 // Read the digital interface
  digitalVal = digitalRead(digitalPin) ; 
  if (digitalVal == HIGH) // When magnetic field is present, Arduino LED is on
  {
    digitalWrite (led, HIGH);
  }
  else
  {
    digitalWrite (led, LOW);
  }
  
 // Read the analog interface
  
}
}</p><br>

Step 7: Results/Lessons Learned

We tested our sensor by simulating a flight test. We hooked up our cubesat to a rotating device so it could spin around a sphere(planet) on a stand. The sphere held magnets within and we rotated the cubesat around the sphere close to the magnets. When simulating the flight test, our sensor could not record any data. That was because the cubesat was too far away from any magnets it flew by.

If we were to redo this project, we would use stronger magnets. We learned that finding the right code can be difficult but persevere and problem solving till it works. The frequency of our CubeSat was 5.6 cycles/sec and our period was .179 sec/ per cycle for our shake test.

Arduino Contest 2019

Participated in the
Arduino Contest 2019

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