MITER SLED FOR SMALL TABLE SAW

Introduction: MITER SLED FOR SMALL TABLE SAW

About: Yes, I'm brillig, and my slithy toves still gyre and gimble in the wabe. With that, let me welcome you to the Little Shop of Jarfold. In my limited space and with my limited tools I tinker and putter and d...

My Little Shop of Jarfold has a new small table saw (23" x 20" top) for which I'll be needing some new jigs. I built a small miter jig using scraps of 3/4" plywood and some thinner scraps for the runners.

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Step 1: BASE AND RUNNERS

I ripped down some scrap wood to EXACTLY fit the slots on the table saw. A few coins held the guides proud of the slots. I glued and screwed the plywood base to the runners. There was absolutely no wiggle to the base in the slots.

Step 2: CUT SLOT

I cut a slot about halfway through the base with the full height of the blade. I glued together pieces of scrap plywood for the miter guides a tad lower than the full height of the blade.

Step 3: THE MITER GUIDES

I marked a line 45 degrees to the blade. I glued and screwed one guide on this line. I trimmed off the overhang. Using a rafter's square, I glued and screwed the other side of the guide. As long as the two sides are exact right angles to each other and you cut one miter on the left and its match on the right, the fits will always be perfect.

Step 4: SAW BLADE GUARD

They call it an accident because it is. They don't call it an ON PURPOSE! So, for safety I glued together some scrap and made a wedge higher than the full height of my raised blade and glued it in place.

Step 5: TESTING THE CUTS

I cut 4 equally long pieces of scrap and mitered the left side. I set up a stop and mitered the right side. It went together perfectly. However, there was one more thing I wanted to add. Something to hold the open kerf at the beginning of the sled in place.

Step 6: FRONT STABILIZER

I added a stabilizer at the front of the sled and ran the blade through it. This, too, was higher than the full extension of the blade. At this point, the sled was done. Let it be noted that this sled has a capacity of cutting 3" wide boards, which is fine for my needs. To cut much wider boards, add more space between the front stabilizer and the miter guides.

Step 7: THANKS FOR STOPPING IN

I know there are many miter sled How-Tos out there, but most are for huge floor model table saws. For those like me and have a small table saw, I hope this helps.

Drop a comment or ask a question. I'd love to hear from you.

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