Make Your Own Waterproof Matches!

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Introduction: Make Your Own Waterproof Matches!

About: I am a maker. As founder of MakerBlog, I enjoy sharing my creations with others.

Making waterproof matches at home isn't anything new. In fact, this instructable was inspired by "How To Make Waterproof Matches." But I wanted to make something original. I wanted to remake waterproof matches out of something unique. So, instead of using traditional candle wax to waterproof my matches, I used the classic kid's toy. Crayons!

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Step 1: You'll Need

  • A Lighter
  • A Disposable Plate
  • A Crayon
  • Several Matches
  • A Knife or Razor

Step 2: Preparing Your Matches

Using your knife, cut the paper wrapping off of your crayon. It doesn't matter what color the crayon is, but I used white crayons. Lay your matches out on the disposable plate, preferably putting the heads close together.

Step 3: Waterproofing Your Matches

Fire up your lighter, and hold the tip of the crayon next to the flame. Rotate the crayon constantly, so as not to burn it. Let the melted crayon drip onto the match heads. It should cover all of the head, and about a 1/4" of the stick. Once a small puddle of crayon wax has gathered around the head of the match, pick up the match and roll it in the melted crayon. This is to ensure that the entire tip is covered in crayon wax. Remove the match from the puddle of wax, before it dries.

Step 4: Congratulations!

You have just made your own, completely unconventional, waterproof crayon matches! The picture above shows the matches floating in a bowl of water. I let them soak for about 5 minutes, and then tried them. They still worked! One of the upsides of using crayons instead of traditional candle wax, is that you don't have to remove the crayon wax before striking. You just need to dry them off and strike them. I'm not sure why this works, but it does! I know, because I did it!

I hope you enjoyed this instructable, and I hope you'll make some of your own "crayon matches". I also encourage you to comment and tell how well yours worked, and make suggestions for possible improvements. Thanks!

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    14 Discussions

    0
    funtogether
    funtogether

    4 years ago on Introduction

    The first three people to leave a comment--with a link to a Facebook page on which they shared this Instructable--will receive a free 3-month pro membership!

    0
    funtogether
    funtogether

    Reply 4 years ago on Introduction

    Thank you to those who shared my Instructable! The three free pro memberships have been taken, but you can still feel free to share it! Thanks!

    0
    no_one59
    no_one59

    3 years ago

    Thanks! Can't wait to try it.

    0
    iheartkookies
    iheartkookies

    4 years ago

    cool beans man I use this alot!!

    0
    KarenM71
    KarenM71

    4 years ago on Introduction

    Awesome ideal for scouts to keep in their patrol boxes.. https://www.facebook.com/karen.medlin.79/posts/10204912737999087

    0
    sking0369
    sking0369

    4 years ago on Introduction

    Could you tell me why Crayon was would be different than candle wax?

    0
    funtogether
    funtogether

    Reply 4 years ago on Introduction

    As best I understand it, the primary difference is the amount of pigment in the wax. Interestingly, that combination of wax and pigment makes the perfect match waterproofer, because you can strike the match without scraping crayon wax off of the tip. In most candlewax waterproofing projects, you have to scrape the wax off of the tip of the match before you attempt to strike it. Also, broken crayons are generally easy to find, whereas candles generally cost more than $1. As you can see, there are a couple benefits to using crayons over candles. I hope I've been helpful!

    Great idea for using broken crayons, plus the older kids had a good time making these for our next camping trip!

    0
    funtogether
    funtogether

    Reply 4 years ago on Introduction

    I didn't think to mention it in the instructable, but it is a fabulous use for broken crayons! Excellent idea!

    0
    OculumForamen

    Great Idea, who doesn't have Crayons??? I have children so I have lots of crayons at home. Making Water proof matches is something that everyone should do and keep on hand with or in an emergency kit with candles. Great spin! Nicely done. :)