Making Mushrooms Last (Duxelles)

Introduction: Making Mushrooms Last (Duxelles)

About: Jack-of-all trades, master of some. I would probably be much more modest if it wasn't for these delusions of granduer that I suffer from.

Recently I made a large batch of chili and by the time all the other ingredients were in the crockpot, I could only fit about half of a pound of chopped up mushrooms in and still get the lid to close. Since I bought a 2 pounds of mushrooms, that left me with a bit of an issue.

I love the flavor mushrooms add to a dish, but I am not a big fan of the texture of cooked mushrooms. My solution is to chop the mushrooms up really small before i add them to the dish ... All of the flavor and none of the spongy texture.

Mushrooms are notorious for not lasting long before they start to go bad. Remember the only time you want to see spots on your mushrooms is in video games.

Step 1: Ingredients

A Duxelle is defined as a preparation of mushrooms sautéed with onions, shallots, garlic, and herbs and used to make stuffing or sauce

For this batch I went very basic. It consisted of just mushrooms, onions, and garlic sautéed in butter.

Step 2: Prep Step

I ran the onion and mushrooms through my hand cranked food processor until they were finely chopped. The garlic was already minced so I just added a few forkfuls to the mix.

Step 3: Reducing the Duxelles

Mushrooms grow by pumping water in to expand their cells. So as you cook the mushrooms you are going to drive out alot of the moisture and reduce the size of your pile of chopped mushroom by a considerable amount.

in a saucepan over medium heat melt a few tablespoons of butter. ad in the onions and garlic and let them sauté for a few minutes before adding the mushrooms. Once you add the mushrooms it will take a few minutes for them to reduce. This batch was done in about 10 minutes and when it started out it filled my large saucepan almost halfway full.

Step 4: Preparing to Store

Once the Duxelles was done cooking I let it cool and then spooned it into a clean jar. I started out with a pound and a half of mushrooms 1 medium sized onion and a few tablespoons of garlic. After cooking it all reduced down enough to fit in a pint jar.

Once I had it all jarred up, I added olive oil to the jar to help preserve the mix. As long as the Duxelles stay covered in the oil it should keep for several months in the fridge. Although at the rate it has been making its way into various recipes, that won't be a concern. This jar will be empty in a few weeks.

***IMPORTANT NOTE***

Because you drove most of the moisture out of the mushrooms during cooking you will need to top off the oil in the jar after the first day because the mushrooms will absorb the oil you initially put in.

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    8 Discussions

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    Dawsie

    4 months ago

    I love the idea, but I,have been making mushroom powder for years now and find it keeps better but not only that you can get a great mushroom flavour without the bulk of the mushrooms. I have been drying the mushrooms now for 30 plus years and have never had a problem with Botilism this is the first time I,have ever heard of it ever in food or mushrooms.

    I have grown my own mushrooms and dried them as well the best part about drying mushrooms is that you can wash them before putting into the drying machine as it will dry off the water at the same time.

    I have also bought old mushrooms that looked fit for the bin from supermarkets as they want a quick sale for them they have produced the best and I mean thenreally best dried mushroom powder I have ever produced. They were not off just a little slimy from their own water content. I have washed them all and sliced them up and placed in the dehydrator and dried them as I would have done fresh mushrooms.

    Once the mushrooms are totally dried I then place into a blender and grind them to a very fine powder. This powder has lasted me for over a year as long as you keep airtight I have placed into all of my jars a special packet for keeping food dry it’s just a special moister Crystal in a bag it collects any moister in the jar and keeps my mushroom powder dry as dry can be.

    When using you only need a few teaspoons in a stew or a sprinkle over scrambled eggs as the flavour is very intense.

    I always place in smaller jars as this cuts down on opening the full batch every time.

    Not all mushrooms can be turned into powder I have tried with shataky mushrooms and they dry out too hard and rubbery to be turned into a powder have even tried to pre grind them first but they just don’t like to be dried once done like this so for them its a case of them up fine and then dry them and they dry out a little chunky but work fine just not as good as good as the old fashion mushroom.

    I still have to try the oyster mushrooms but don’t see them too often in the shop and I have tried growing my own but the heat wave we had this summer killled off all attempts at growing them. Only got the first flush of growth but nothing after that.

    I tried to add the I images of my jars of mushroom powder but it would not access the library where they are on my iPad so no idea on how to share them with you?

    2 replies

    Lucky me .. I just got a hold of a dehydrator recently. I will have to try making mushroom powder

    Thanks for the knowledge

    your very welcome :-) I know you will enjoy the flavour :-)

    I can not remember if I stated to slice the mushrooms to aid in drying them faster :-)

    Have fun

    Duxelles are a great and tasty addition to many dishes. (Mix with Pesto!)

    Please consider freezing in sandwich bags. Flatten contents and squeeze out excess air. Defrosts in less than a minute.

    Covering anything that "might" have soil on it with oil, is the only condition that Botulism likes. Yes, Botulism poisoning is "rare". But that particular microbe is present in soil all over the planet. Science says you are taking a small risk...

    It may seem alarmist to some, but I'm a chef, I cannot afford to take chances with what I serve to others.

    3 replies

    That is interesting to know. I did not know you could freeze Duxelles, I will have to try that. Do you think it would work using an icecube tray to make portions, and then transferring to a freezer bag once it is solidified, or would the "cubes" just crumble apart in the bag?


    Since Botulism can survive in temps up to 248 degrees F it is possible it could survive the cooking process.

    According to the CDC for Botulism in the US in 2017; Foodborne botulism accounted for 39 illnesses, or 20 percent of all cases with one death.

    I understand your reluctance to expose your clients to possible (no matter how minor) exposure.

    Hi again,

    For me, whether to home freeze or not depends on how much damage is done during ice crystal formation. A duxelle would not suffer, too much, from cell damage.

    I always freeze flat. It's all about the surface area. My freezer looks like a library. Stacks of gallon, quart, pint bags. My chicken soup has onions, carrots, celery and chicken only. Then when I pull it for use I can make Chicken dumpling, Chicken Rice, Chicken Noodle, Cajun Chicken, etc. I do the same for tomato sauce.

    When I want to freeze small quantities like 10 cloves of roasted garlic or maybe two Tablespoon of Duxelle I am cheap enough to cut a sandwich bag in two, and use each corner with a twist tie. Air is the enemy of frozen food. You can't seal an ice cube tray.

    If you still want to use an ice cube tray, it may indeed crumble. I would suggest using a complementary liquid to help seal air space to slow freezer burn. Ideally, the rehydration water from some dried mushrooms but any broth would work as well.

    now all you need is a few slide out containers with various freezer bag dimensions and you can stand all your baggies up and create your own freezer filing cabinet :D

    Hi again,

    For me, whether to home freeze or not depends on how much damage is done during ice crystal formation. A duxelle would not suffer, too much, from cell damage.

    I always freeze flat. It's all about the surface area. My freezer looks like a library. Stacks of gallon, quart, pint bags. My chicken soup has onions, carrots, celery and chicken only. Then when I pull it for use I can make Chicken dumpling, Chicken Rice, Chicken Noodle, Cajun Chicken, etc. I do the same for tomato sauce.

    When I want to freeze small quantities like 10 cloves of roasted garlic or maybe two Tablespoon of Duxelle I am cheap enough to cut a sandwich bag in two, and use each corner with a twist tie. Air is the enemy of frozen food. You can't seal an ice cube tray.

    If you still want to use an ice cube tray, it may indeed crumble. I would suggest using a complementary liquid to help seal air space to slow freezer burn. Ideally, the rehydration water from some dried mushrooms but any broth would work as well.